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Booked my 2018 RT/SP in for its first service. Just an oil/filter service at 1281 miles. Put these miles on the car since I bought it new on 12/17/2017.

Had thought I could avoid driving the car in the rain but wouldn't you know it is pouring rain today and I didn't want to try to reschedule the service.

Car's just fine in the rain. I'm easy on the gas anyhow -- best traction control is one's right foot -- and it wasn't hard to ease back just a little more to give myself some margin just in case.

SA asked me if I wanted the synthetic oil? That was a bit troubling that there is a choice. I thought Chrysler/Dodge had decreed just Pennzoil 0w-40 Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic for the 392? Anyhow, I stated I wanted the above oil used and stated this several times and I was told that would be the oil used.

I don't know if the dealer buys this by the quart bottle -- I know when I bought some from the parts department a week or so back I got it in quart bottles -- or buys it in drums to be dispensed by the service bay oil gun. 'course, didn't see what the tech used. But the hot idle oil pressure is the same as before so it looks like whatever was in there when the engine left the factor is in the engine now and I assume (sigh) the engine left the factory with the right oil.

Will do another oil change maybe at 2.5K miles then because I don't think I'll put more than 5K or 6K miles on the car per year -- going to be hard to limit myself to that annual mileage I can tell you -- I'll just change the oil every 6 months.

My plan is to drive the car a year or two then sell it/trade it in probably for a Hellcat. While the HC is way over the top think I want to own one just for the experience. Have to admit I scouted the dealer's showroom floor and the portion of the new car lot I could see from inside the showroom -- didn't venture outside it was pouring rain -- for a HC but didn't spot one. Just as well. I might have done the trade then and there.
 

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My experience is dealers have their oil in tanks filled from a truck and pump it straight into your car, it is easy for them to tell you what you want to hear regarding spec's but you or I will never really know what the have put in your car, the good news is it obviously cant be bad for your car because they will have to meet warranty conditions.
 

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My experience is dealers have their oil in tanks filled from a truck and pump it straight into your car, it is easy for them to tell you what you want to hear regarding spec's but you or I will never really know what the have put in your car, the good news is it obviously cant be bad for your car because they will have to meet warranty conditions.
The dealer service department probably has at least one drum or barrel of oil that is the most common oil used in the cars. With Dodge/Chrysler/Jeep I'm not sure what that would be though.

I know the dealer parts department stocks the Pennzoil 0w-40 Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic cause I bought 8 quarts there a week or two back.

On the drive from the dealer to my house the oil temperature and oil pressure values appeared to be the same under the same operating conditions so I'm pretty confident that at least the same oil that was in the engine when I brought it in for service was used this oil service. I have the Performance Pages app running and have coolant temperature, oil temperature, oil pressure and battery voltage displayed on the center LCD almost all the time.

If I had my doubts what I had planned on doing was this Saturday was to drive over to a place I know in the central valley that has an oil analysis machine and have a sample of the engine oil analyzed along with a sample from a new bottle of Pennzoil 0w-40 Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic. From the analysis I'm pretty sure I can tell if the two oils are the same or not the same.
 

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Using oil pressure to ‘determine’ the type of oil used is crazy, sorry. A better test would be the operation of the MDS, the wrong oil can cause it to not perform correctly. Still wrought with potential error. But unless we actually see the dealer add the oil we have to trust him. That’s one reason I have supplied my own oil to the neighborhood oil change shop. I can watch them put it in.



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Discussion Starter #5
Using oil pressure to ‘determine’ the type of oil used is crazy, sorry. A better test would be the operation of the MDS, the wrong oil can cause it to not perform correctly. Still wrought with potential error. But unless we actually see the dealer add the oil we have to trust him. That’s one reason I have supplied my own oil to the neighborhood oil change shop. I can watch them put it in.



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Yeah, in hindsight probably crazy.

FWIW, my thinking was while one can't use oil pressure to distinguish between say Pennzoil 0w-40 and Mobil 0w-40 -- and this was not what I was concerned about anyhow -- I was expecting from the oil pressure to know if a 0w/5w-20/30 oil was used rather an 0w-40 oil. It was the use of one of these lower viscosity oils that I was worried about. Not really worried but it never hurts to have some level of confirmation something at least close to the right oil was used.

But who knows? Maybe even with a 0w-20 oil the oil pressure at least at hot idle would be the same as with 0w-40? (I admit with my Turbo I could not tell if 0w-40 or 5w-50 oil was in the oil tank. Hot idle oil pressure was the same, as nearly the same as I could tell, under the same ambient air temperature conditions.)

Did remember this AM and fetched the service invoice from the front seat of the car. I saw that Pennzoil 0w-40 synthetic oil was specifically listed as being used.

Never use MDS. I have MDS "disabled" by using the automatic's manual shift mode.
 

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Yeah, in hindsight probably crazy.

FWIW, my thinking was while one can't use oil pressure to distinguish between say Pennzoil 0w-40 and Mobil 0w-40 -- and this was not what I was concerned about anyhow -- I was expecting from the oil pressure to know if a 0w/5w-20/30 oil was used rather an 0w-40 oil. It was the use of one of these lower viscosity oils that I was worried about. Not really worried but it never hurts to have some level of confirmation something at least close to the right oil was used.

But who knows? Maybe even with a 0w-20 oil the oil pressure at least at hot idle would be the same as with 0w-40? (I admit with my Turbo I could not tell if 0w-40 or 5w-50 oil was in the oil tank. Hot idle oil pressure was the same, as nearly the same as I could tell, under the same ambient air temperature conditions.)

Did remember this AM and fetched the service invoice from the front seat of the car. I saw that Pennzoil 0w-40 synthetic oil was specifically listed as being used.

Never use MDS. I have MDS "disabled" by using the automatic's manual shift mode.
Just FYI, MDS is always disabled when you use sport mode. That's the best way to drive IMO :) That way you can leave it in D and still use the paddles at will, but it defaults back when you stop using them for a bit.
 

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Heres a wild question. Has anyone in the history of car forums who actually changes their oil on a regular basis (standard oil, nothing special), ever had an oil related issue with their engines? I mean people beat on normal cars for thousands of miles, and never get oil changes. And the engines seem to survive. Im sure if they use the standard dyno oil vs some ultra platinum whale snot mobil 1000 oil, either way youd never know. And neither would the car. As long as you are changing around 5k miles, you are fine people. Just use the recommended weight. Oil brand is really not a huge deal unless you are looking at special oils for wet clutches or long idling engines.
 

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Heres a wild question. Has anyone in the history of car forums who actually changes their oil on a regular basis (standard oil, nothing special), ever had an oil related issue with their engines? I mean people beat on normal cars for thousands of miles, and never get oil changes. And the engines seem to survive. Im sure if they use the standard dyno oil vs some ultra platinum whale snot mobil 1000 oil, either way youd never know. And neither would the car. As long as you are changing around 5k miles, you are fine people. Just use the recommended weight. Oil brand is really not a huge deal unless you are looking at special oils for wet clutches or long idling engines.
I'll give you an example - friend of mine is heavy line mechanic at an independent shop.

'14 Ford F-150 with 6.2L gas engine. Sales rep used this vehicle (HVAC contractor) to travel around to client sites, client calls.

Vehicle calls for 7.5k oil changes - looks like the employee went beyond 10K intervals and looks like was skipping intervals.

130K on the engine and its shot - bearings are worn and oil pressure is just a couple of PSI.
3+ year old vehicle and they sourced a used engine to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Heres a wild question. Has anyone in the history of car forums who actually changes their oil on a regular basis (standard oil, nothing special), ever had an oil related issue with their engines? I mean people beat on normal cars for thousands of miles, and never get oil changes. And the engines seem to survive. Im sure if they use the standard dyno oil vs some ultra platinum whale snot mobil 1000 oil, either way youd never know. And neither would the car. As long as you are changing around 5k miles, you are fine people. Just use the recommended weight. Oil brand is really not a huge deal unless you are looking at special oils for wet clutches or long idling engines.
Changing oil regularly and within a reasonable number of miles can and does go a long way towards compensating for any oil shortcomings.

Years -- and I mean years -- ago I was an avid reader of car and motorcycle magazines. (Not so much now as I do not have the time.) I read the mags cover to cover and this included the letters section. There was the occasional letter from the owner (different owners not the same owner) of a (name the brand) car with big miles on the engine and invariably the common theme was regular and rather frequent oil/filter services. This back in the day when top ends often needed refreshing at between 30K and 50K miles.

There is the question of how the car is used, too. As I think I may have covered my (previous) cars (including my last two, Porsches) got oil/filter services every 5K miles. Once in a while I'd get the oil/filter service done before heading out on a 4K+ mile road trip. I'd be gone and back in a week's time. The car would resume its normal routine a 60 mile (mostly freeway) a day work commute.

When 5K miles rolled around I'd do the oil/filter service. Invariably the draining oil would have some amber color to it, have some translucence (all except the VW Golf TDi... the oil would be black in no time). If my usage consisted of just highway driving I could have probably extended that 5K miles to 10K miles. (In one case due to family matters, I forgot to get the Turbo in for its 5K mile oil change. When I did take it in the SA looked back at the service records and noted it had been 10K miles. The engine was fine, of course, but still I resumed the 5K mile oil/filter service interval.)

Trouble is not everyone subjects their car to the same usage. So while maybe 10K mile oil/filter services could work for me, or you, they may not work for everyone.

I'm not qualified to offer any modification to the factory's recommendation regarding oil. Use the oil the factory recommends. And change it at least on the factory's schedule. If one wants to "help" his engine reach big miles, change the oil/filter more often.

I have found 5K miles works for my cars, my type of usage, for the climatic conditions where I live/drive, etc. It is a rare car of mine that covers less than 100K miles. (Generally if it covers less than 100K miles it is because I have fallen out of love with it and get rid of it.)

For those I remain in love with, some cover 140K miles, 160K miles, and one has covered 320K+ miles. None have manifested any signs of engine issues (or transmission issues -- I have the transmission/diff fluids changed more often than the factory recommends too) due to the type of fluid used and the fluid service intervals.

Modern engines are not always rebuildable. For instance Porsche doesn't even publish the spec's for its modern engines. No main bearing journal sizes/limits, no clearances, nothing one can use to determine if an engine needs attention. Porsche doesn't offer oversize pistons/ring sets, oversized bearings, and new replacement hardware -- like crankshafts, rods, pistons, etc. -- is priced like it was made out of gold or platinum rather than iron, steel, or aluminum.

As for the cost of a replacement engine... For my 2002 Boxster I priced a replacement engine: $26K with no core. With a suitable core the price dropped to $17K. For my Turbo? Approx. $50K. When I came to I didn't bother to ask if that was with or without a core.

So keeping a modern engine filled with oil that is the right oil for the climate conditions and type of driving one engages in and changing the oil at reasonable intervals is about all one can do to extend the service life of a very expensive piece of hardware.

A bit long I know but I want to add/point out the oil and filter are the sacrificial items in the oil/filter and engine relationship. One replaces oil and the filter ideally before it really needs to be replaced so one doesn't have to replace the engine. My Boxster has covered 320K+ miles. That's at least 64 oil/filter services. At an average cost of $200 I've spent $12,800 on oil/filter services for the car. The engine still starts right up. Idles smoothly. Makes no untoward noises. Oil consumption hasn't changed that much over time and gas mileage remains about the same. The engine once warmed up pulls quite nicely all the way to red line (7200 RPMs) and afterwards settles into its sewing machine smooth idle. And $12,800 is way less than a $16K engine -- assuming the old engine satisfies the core requirement -- and the several thousand dollars it would cost to drop the old engine and install the new one.

I plan on following the same 5K mile (or 6 month) oil/filter service for both my new Challenger R/T Scat Pack and my new Mini JCW. (As aside the cost of a dealer oil/filter service for my Challenger is $125. For my Mini JCW: Less than $100.)
 

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I'll give you an example - friend of mine is heavy line mechanic at an independent shop.

'14 Ford F-150 with 6.2L gas engine. Sales rep used this vehicle (HVAC contractor) to travel around to client sites, client calls.

Vehicle calls for 7.5k oil changes - looks like the employee went beyond 10K intervals and looks like was skipping intervals.

130K on the engine and its shot - bearings are worn and oil pressure is just a couple of PSI.
3+ year old vehicle and they sourced a used engine to replace it.
SO with all that being said, do you see anyone here with a challenger doing this?? I dont. Further more spending a ton on expensive is a waste of money.
 

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SO with all that being said, do you see anyone here with a challenger doing this?? I dont. Further more spending a ton on expensive is a waste of money.
I recall a post where the son of a Chrysler employee got his father's SE or SXT - the old man never did much maintenance, just gas and drive it.

The son changed all the fluids and the oil looked like it had gone a long time from his comments

Engine failure within the first months he had the car and it wasn't much over 100k on the car. Neglect shorted the life on it.
 

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SO with all that being said, do you see anyone here with a challenger doing this?? I dont. Further more spending a ton on expensive is a waste of money.


Not putting synthetic oil that cost an extra1.80 a quart or something in a 50k car....especially after its been proven over and over to be superior in every performance and durability metric is simply moronic imo...


Oh and all the srt motors come equipped with it...and they use it for the free oil changes too...
 

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First "service" and rain...

For the past 20+ yrs I’ve always purchased my own syn oil and high performance oil filters and brought them to the oil change places(saves me having to dispose of the oil). I based my oil/filter choices on forum discussions on sites like “Bob is the oil guy”. A large number of the forum members used oil analysis results to come up with the best filters and oil.

I personally would never cheap out on oil and filters. My first SP change was at 800 miles. I don’t understand why people would skimp with a 40-50k car. It’s not much different than people putting low grade gas in a car that recommends or requires premium. Why do that?

In my heads cam corvette I would spend $13/qt for high zinc oil to reduce wear in the valve train because of the high lift cam. With high perf vehicles you usually have to pay to play, for longevity’s sake.




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