Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
I love F1. They have made some amazing developements over the years. However, to slow them back down lots of great innovations are no longer legal. Several years ago they did a video of a Ford, a Porsche 928 and a F1 car doing one lap.

As the Ford took off the F1 driver was drinking coffee. After the Porsche took off he was getting into his F1 car. Then he took off. All 3 crossed the finish line together. It was, to say the least, extremely impressive.:)

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBwQtwIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D0nPLsEE_duE&ei=QN9jTYL1Acmr8Aa--72lDA&usg=AFQjCNEQ9oH49RI_yfr2Vj2rwuqdVKs67Q
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
783 Posts
It costs between 300 million and 600 million to build and race a F1 for the season. I believe they describe it as 'The worlds most expensive sport". I like to watch the qualifiing runs. I find the actual races to be boring.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
Both have lots of talent. Open wheel vs. enclosed cars - quite a difference there. As an engineer I've always enjoyed the amazing innovations in F1.

An example from Car and Driver magazine article:
F1 plug on the left - car plug on right - GP motorcycle in middle


Champion's basic Formula 1 plug that was used in the 1990s was similar in length to the one described above, but half the diameter. Then in 1999, one of the teams told McMurray that for the amount of space the spark plug inhabited, it was the heaviest part on the car (that plug weighed only 25.9 grams, or less than one-tenth of a pound). Unless Champion could reduce the weight of the plug by 20 percent every year until the team told them to stop, Champion was going to be out.
The plug McMurray and crew produced in response is smaller than your pinky. It's only 1.5 inches long, and the diameter of its threads is about 0.3 inch, or roughly half the diameter of a conventional plug. It also requires a special tool for installation so that the spark-plug hole in the cylinder head can be made as small as possible. Real estate in an F1 combustion chamber is a precious commodity because any space taken by the spark plug leaves less room for the valves, and as we all know, the larger the valves, the greater the airflow, and the greater the potential power output. As a final point, the plug weighs 10.7 grams, or a scant 0.024 pound. "Since we came out with that plug in 1999, they haven't asked us for any more weight reductions," said McMurray, beaming.
Besides its tiny size, another interesting feature of the F1 plug is that there's no protruding J-hook on the bottom. That's because there simply isn't room for one. "A normal ground electrode doesn't have a chance of surviving in an F1 motor," commented McMurray. "It would get crushed by the piston or simply shaken loose by the intense vibration." When an F1 piston is at the top of its stroke, it just about touches the cylinder head. The combustion-chamber volume is mostly made up of the recessed divots in the piston tops that are there to provide room for the valves. Without that hook, the ground electrode is simply the bottom edge of the threads. This design is known as a surface-gap spark plug.
To get an idea of the precision of the components of an F1 engine, McMurray told me that when Champion builds its F1 spark plugs, the length varies minutely from plug to plug. This is known as manufacturing tolerance; for the F1 plugs, the difference from the longest to the shortest plug is only 0.002 inch, or about the same as the thickness of the paper you're holding in your hands. If a spark plug is on the long side, the piston might hit it, so teams machine a divot in the piston or shim the spark plugs with washers.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top