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I think I would get some bolts and angle iron and bolt up across it, and pull it flat first.
 

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It cannot be fixed at home as special tools are required to do the job; tools that body shops rent because they are so expensive.
 

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If only the mounting point is bent, it is steel, it will bend back. If its location has changed, well that is a different story.
ANd that would laugh at a rubber hammer. I have a lead hammer I would use on it if there was room to swing it. But I would get angle iron, or box section across the top holes, and across the bottom holes, bolt to the left holes tight, then bolts through the right holes (with lube) and see if it pulls back flush. Then slide hammer on the box sections.
But this is how I straightened the frame on my 1975 Impala, if it doesn't include a come-along and a tree, you aren't doing it right!
Best car ever made, ever, period, no discussion possible. Other then it should have been made of stainless steel.
Both front and rear frame rails got bent after a snow covered off ramp with 90 degree turn (Squirrel Hill Tunnel) over the parkway, tapped front and rear bumpers on the barrier. Tore it apart, sledge hammers, chains, trees, port a power, and got it all bolted back up, only thing ruined was one of the corner lamp assemblies.
(I think this was 1986)
1024382
 
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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Do you need just a rubber hammer?
The right side (viewer) of the frame rail got bent. View attachment 1024334
Pounding the bent portion of the flange back into position is unlikely to get it into the correct position. You would need some trial fitting to verify it is in at least a "good enough" position.

A pro collision repair shop would put the car on a Celette Bench and with the proper gauges/fixture determine how far out of position the flange is and using the bench rig up something to pull the flange back into proper position. During this operation the tech would use the gauges to ensure it was back to proper position. Because being steel the flange would have to pulled a bit more than necessary so when the pulling force was relaxed and the flange pulled back a bit it would end up in the proper location.

For just that flange the cost to have this done at a body repair shop would not be excessive.

And it would ensure the flange is back to where it belongs.

It doesn't take much out of position to really make life more difficult -- or really impossible -- to get the rest of the hardware that depends upon that flange's position to fit/line up properly.

The framework -- no pun -- for a proper car repair starts by having all critical hard points in their proper location.
 

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Pounding the bent portion of the flange back into position is unlikely to get it into the correct position. You would need some trial fitting to verify it is in at least a "good enough" position.

A pro collision repair shop would put the car on a Celette Bench and with the proper gauges/fixture determine how far out of position the flange is and using the bench rig up something to pull the flange back into proper position. During this operation the tech would use the gauges to ensure it was back to proper position. Because being steel the flange would have to pulled a bit more than necessary so when the pulling force was relaxed and the flange pulled back a bit it would end up in the proper location.

For just that flange the cost to have this done at a body repair shop would not be excessive.

And it would ensure the flange is back to where it belongs.

It doesn't take much out of position to really make life more difficult -- or really impossible -- to get the rest of the hardware that depends upon that flange's position to fit/line up properly.

The framework -- no pun -- for a proper car repair starts by having all critical hard points in their proper location.
yes, and the big thing the DIY guys overlook is “what else moved”. They only see the obvious. There is load pathing engineered into these rails for collision energy mitigation.

the obvious at the flange could also include the rail being out of spec anywhere along the rail.

full structural measurements are critically important.
 

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But this is how I straightened the frame on my 1975 Impala, if it doesn't include a come-along and a tree, you aren't doing it right!
Best car ever made, ever, period, no discussion possible. Other then it should have been made of stainless steel.
Both front and rear frame rails got bent after a snow covered off ramp with 90 degree turn (Squirrel Hill Tunnel) over the parkway, tapped front and rear bumpers on the barrier. Tore it apart, sledge hammers, chains, trees, port a power, and got it all bolted back up, only thing ruined was one of the corner lamp assemblies.
(I think this was 1986)
View attachment 1024382
I know exactly the off ramp you are talking about. Reminds me of Mineo's Pizza. I like the on ramp on the other side that forces you to drag race towards the outbound side of the tunnels
 

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I know exactly the off ramp you are talking about. Reminds me of Mineo's Pizza. I like the on ramp on the other side that forces you to drag race towards the outbound side of the tunnels
Exactly! I worked at Foto Hut on Forbes (not the one on Murray) in 1986. Then decades later I worked in Oakland for over 20 years now (WFH now) and have merged there thousands and thousands of times.
And the OP, try it. Level it out, see how it goes back together. If it is drivable, get it measured. Any more pics of all of the damage before teardown?
 

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I think OP should verify how it was bent. I believe it happened while removing the stock impact bar, so it's not accident related in any way. That being the case, no need for frame machines or any of that. the rail is fine. I doubt a hammer would go very far. I'd probably try to bolt something up to the bent side and bend it back. Assuming that's how it got bent in the first place, by pulling the impact bar off from one side with the spot welds in place on that side.
 

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I think OP should verify how it was bent. I believe it happened while removing the stock impact bar, so it's not accident related in any way. That being the case, no need for frame machines or any of that. the rail is fine. I doubt a hammer would go very far. I'd probably try to bolt something up to the bent side and bend it back. Assuming that's how it got bent in the first place, by pulling the impact bar off from one side with the spot welds in place on that side.
That isn’t the result of taking the bar off.
 

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That isn’t the result of taking the bar off.
How do you know that? I replaced my impact bar. after removing the bolts if you only drill out the spot welds on one side and then pull from that side trying to just pry it off the other side without drilling out those spot welds too then this can happen.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
That isn’t the result of taking the bar off.
Actually, it was the result of taking the bar off, but I should have mentioned that in the OP. I was finally able to fix it, using a heat gun and pair of pliers. I put the factory impact bar back on. IMO, it wasn't really worth all the trouble putting a lightweight impact bar on.
 

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Actually, it was the result of taking the bar off, but I should have mentioned that in the OP. I was finally able to fix it, using a heat gun and pair of pliers. I put the factory impact bar back on. IMO, it wasn't really worth all the trouble putting a lightweight impact bar on.
how did you manage to bend that flange by taking the bar off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
how did you manage to bend that flange by taking the bar off?
Good question~! When I was removing the second spot weld, I was very close to getting the metal all the way off and just decided to try and twist the metal bar, etc. That's what I caused it. I'm NEVER doing that again. Way too much trouble and not really worth it.
 

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Good question~! When I was removing the second spot weld, I was very close to getting the metal all the way off and just decided to try and twist the metal bar, etc. That's what I caused it. I'm NEVER doing that again. Way too much trouble and not really worth it.
Ok, that explains everything. No collision damage or anything. I'm following now.
 
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