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Before I start thinking about upgrading speakers etc. in my SP I figured I would measure the frequency response of the factory system. So I am posting here in case it is useful.

This is measured with V5.20 64-bit REW software on my Windows Surface Pro 4. I calibrated the sound card and used an IMM6 Dayton mic with the downloaded calibration file loaded into REW. Surface audio output was set at 100% and the surface mic input was set at 75 and "listen" mode was turned off. I used the Aux input and volume was set at 30. The system was measured with doors closed, I fed sound cable through the driver side door and the Surface was on the roof outside with the door and window closed.

The test sweep signal was about -35dB. I did not calibrate the system with an external SPL. I guess I could fork out the $20-30 for that eventually.

The images posted are of the mic placement and the 1/12 octave smoothing profile of the sweep.

Overall you can see the system leave a lot to be desired. It is pretty flat through most of the range with some odd holes and spikes.
 

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2019 Dodge Challenger Scat Pack Shaker
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I have no idea what u said but it sounded cool. So what are thinking to improve the profile?
 

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I have no idea what u said but it sounded cool. So what are thinking to improve the profile?
LOL that was a bit full of jargon! A typical good sounding system will have s low-frequency camel-hump, be flat for a bit and then decline at the higher frequencies. Here is a compilation of several standard curves.

https://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a224/pionkej/Murano%20Build%20Log/TargetCurveComparison-1.png.html

To fix the curve here, I would likely replace the speakers for better quality, then use an adapter to run the sound signal to a digital sound processor that could modify the signal prior to running to amplifiers. With that I would work on elevating the lower frequencies and eliminating the hills and valleys to produce a smooth lower end "hump". Then modify the signal to have that mid-range shelf then decline. I did that in my '12 Charger that came with the 6 speaker system and it came out like this and it sounds way better.
 

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