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Discussion Starter #1
It feels like if left in "D" the auto always has it in the wrong gear (chug) even when it kicks down (If it kicks down to a lower gear??) from a move.
Shifting the auto manually is a world of difference in the seat of pants feel, on a run.

I wish the automatic worked with the engine better.
Keeping the revs in the right power band.

Anyone else notice any of this?
 

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1. The automatic is adaptive...drive it harder, and it will behave more aggressively in return

2. The key to getting the engine and the automatic to work together (as far as gearing and powerband) is all in the throttle inputs you give it. That said, ignore the 0-50% range of the throttle if you really want to "do" something. All the action is in the 50-100% range. 0-50% is essentially all econo-mode programming, so don't waste time there, unless economy was your intent.

3. The powerband basically starts at 3000 rpm. If you select any gear or trigger any downshift, that is the rpm you want to be jumping into or near, if you want the hemi to sing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Agreed (3000 rpm) but you can only be consistent by shifting manually. Otherwise it usually put you in some type granny mode or an awkward downshift mode then back up too fast.

Put the car in "1" and hit the throttle and its a world of difference vs "D" and pushing the throttle with the TC off.
Auto mode Tyranny's rpm sync with engine is the major weak point. (My opinion.)
A good auto keeps you in the power band. This car needs a driver to be driven. No freebie's
 

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see if I got this right.......since the the auto is adaptive when you drive it manually, going threw the gears, and being aggressive, that will effect the way it shifts when you drive it in auto?
 

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I've never really figured that out or not. Sometimes it feels like its behavior was affected by what I just did while I was in autostick, other times not so much.

I do believe if you drive it aggressively enough in full auto mode, the transmission will change behavior to specifically keep you in the powerband. It is a very distinct change that you know it is down for rock'n'roll...though, how often and consistently can you expect to aggressively throttle a near 500 hp engine on a public street w/o getting into serious trouble? That's the big catch-22! You can get the transmission into this sweet-zone for a short occasion, but it is very hard to keep it there with the driving that you would need to do it, unless you are a bank robber. The irony here is that the v6 would probably be easier than the 392 to drive like this to keep the transmission toned-up, but losing about 200 ft-lbs of torque would kind of defeat the whole point of why these cars are fun, right? ;)

I've got mines "trained" to easily hold upshifts to 3000-ish rpm, but it will fade away if I don't continue to give the throttle some zest when I take-off from a stop. On a rare occasion, I've got it stewed up enough that it will downshift early as I'm driving such that it is staging at that 3000-ish rpm gateway to the powerband. Usually this comes about when hwy traffic was going at a good clip, but has dropped to a halt because of "something" going on up ahead, then the speeds are choppy, lots of gaps, and I have the liberty to engage in some lane jockeying, if need be. I've also seen it happen as I come off a long high speed exit from the hwy.

As noted in earlier posts, autostick is definitely your friend to take the uncertainty out of piloting the transmission for impromptu instances of hot-footing it. Get familiar with it, and get the feel for what gear you need to be in for a given speed to jump into the powerband. I've been saying 3000-ish rpm all this time, but that is really for the 5.7 L mindset. I would anticipate that you 392 owners could probably finagle that figure down to 2600-ish rpm (though you are likely heavier and have higher expectations for an SRT, so maybe 3000-ish rpm is still not a bad target). There will usually be one gear that will put you around 3000 rpm to be at the beginning of the powerband, and there will be another that puts you right in the meat of the torque curve in the 4000-ish rpm. God help you if you choose the latter, because it's like you suddenly opened a can of whoop-ass.
 

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One oddball aspect to this is to become mindful of when heatsoak raises its ugly head on these hemi's. When these engines are running at their "happy" temperature and getting fed cool air on the intake, there's usually pleasing amounts of power available across the entire rpm range, not just 3000+. The engine has the umph to turn whatever gear it is in so that rpm's will be rising quickly beyond through that 3000 rpm threshold, anyway.

When it gets heatsoaked, output gets soggy, and you really feel the loss of power if you are hitting anywhere outside the formal "powerband". It won't feel like the v8 that you thought you had, when it gets into that state. That's for sure. If you are typically filling up with the highest octane grade of fuel, usually it mitigates a good deal of that sogginess during heatsoak, though.
 

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Step lite throttle to 2500 rpm. Then stomp the gas to the floor and hold on. Power band right to red line thru 3 gears O WHAT FUN!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Step lite throttle to 2500 rpm. Then stomp the gas to the floor and hold on. Power band right to red line thru 3 gears O WHAT FUN!!!
Start in 2nd or 3rd gear, 3k and stomp it. Not as fun.
Start in first gear at 3k and the above quote holds true!
 
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