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2020 Hellcat Redeye Wide body
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Decided to go for a drive after work, gave it a little pull while entering highway. Everything was fine. After i reached about 80-90mph had a sudden power loss! Coolant temp shot up to max temp and cluster displayed low batter voltage as well as overheat warning shortly after! I drove for at max 3-4 minutes before i found a spot to pull over to, immediately shut car off and pop hood. As i popped hood serpentine belt was shredded, coolant violently bubbling into overflow tank and dripping to ground. Pulleys weren't seized so no idea what caused. Took it to dealer, told them my concern of warped aluminum/piston damage/broken head gasket seal, etc. tech told me himself he replaced serpentine belt and drove on highway. Said everything seemed fine. My question is should i be worried of engine damage or should i listen to tech that car is fine? What are tall tale signs i should look for? Got car back yesterday. Thank you in advance for any help!

Edit: Originally stated serpintine belt broke but in fact it was both the supercharger belt and serpentine belt! For those 3-4 minutes coolant was NOT flowing (inactive water pump). Tech stated that the tank shown in picture was my "overflow tank". That in fact is the engine coolant tank, tank to left is SC coolant tank. Checked oil catch can and metallic particulate matter seems to be floating around (picture below)
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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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I wouldn’t worry too much about permanent damage from the overheat. These Hemi’s are pretty resilient. Through a circus of mistakes and missteps on my own part, I managed to run my 5.7L to the point of boiling over the reservoir 3 times in one night. If any overheated engine should have permanent damage, mine certainly should have, but it doesn’t. I’m about to turn 200K miles on it, and it’s still running strong.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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The odds are if the engine suffered any from the experience you'd know it.

But to be safe check the oil level to ensure it is good. At the same time check the coolant level. Carefully note the levels.

Drive the car. Check the levels periodically for any signs of any change.

Keep an eye on the ground under the car for any leak sign. Check for this when you walk up to the car.

And in general just be on alert for any signs of engine troubles like rough running, inconsistent idle speed, really anything out of the ordinary. As time passes and nothing shows up then you can relax.

I'm a bit worried about the belt failing "out of the blue" so to speak. These belts are generally pretty robust but of course a bad belt can fail with no other contributing cause.

While you keep an eye on the fluid levels check the belt for any signs of accelerated deterioration. Check the edges of the belt. Both edges should be "dull". If one (or both) develops a sharpness this can be a sign the belt is not tracking right and this can result in a shortened belt life. It can be a sign of an accessory drive with bearing play, too.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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One thing you should probably do if it has not been done already is change the oil. The synthetic oil that came in it can handle < 300F operating temps, but why chance it. Get some fresh oil in there to replace any that was prematurely spent by the excessive heat, and there’s nothing to worry about as far as the lubrication goes.

Operating the engine once it overheats is what will absolutely cause damage. It sounds like you did not do that though, shutting it down once things went sideways. Dollars’ll getcha donuts that engine suffered no lasting effects from the incident.
 

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You have engine damage or you don't. If you do, it will show itself. Just drive it (after fluid changes mentioned above) and see what happens.

Your only real option is to pay someone to pull the engine, disassemble it and inspect everything.

I guess a leak download test might not be a bad idea if you are really curious.

3-4 minutes is way too long to drive on an overheated engine.
 

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i would not worry if you only drove 3-4 min as i assume the coolent temp was not that high for the first min or so. the t stat would be open to allow some small amount of convection flow.

i once drove a older dodge 360 without a water pump belt 20 miles home by running it till the gauge went to hot and letting it cool a 1/2 hour then doing it again. no ill effects, it ran another 100k. if you suspect anything send the oil in for analysis they will tell you if anything bad is going on
 
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