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A Guy
 
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the pitch that your engine noise is sounds like rod bearing knock - that's a heavy sound. A shop would use a stethoscope to trace where the sound it coming from.

depending on the miles and how it was maintained things have worn. What you're hearing is excess clearance and those bearings will basically pound out and have more clearance. with the greater clearance oil pressure bleeds off in that bearing and contributes to it wearing more as well

if a bearing shell spins, it will block off the oil lubrication hole and it will be a catastrophic failure that results in crankshaft bearing damage or the connecting rod fails.
 
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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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new video example
I just saw this last post and listened to that video...yeah it is not nearly as audible in that one, which a rod knocking should still be.

Im wondering if it could be a loose wrist pin causing piston slap or something...IDK, this is def a strange one...lemme listen again on a better audio player and I will see if I can hear it then
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Hell now I see @A Guy and @Hal H have already replied, I didn’t see their posts 5 min ago which why I replied...but now I do...something is up here...or I have finally gone insane...
?
 

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new video example
The noise in the latest clip can be explained by at cold start oil pressure is elevated and this tends to attenuate the noise. As the engine warms up the oil gets hotter and one result is at idle the oil pressure is low, maybe a bit under normal hot idle oil pressure because -- if it is a rod bearing -- this represents an internal oil pressure leak which will tend to drop hot idle oil pressure.

But as engine RPMs go up oil pressure goes up and this tends to attenuate the noise.

You are not going to listen the noise away. Someone will have to get his hands dirty.

In the meantime no good and potentially a lot of harm can come from continuing to run the engine. The rod can fracture. The crank rod journal can be scored beyond repair. Of the crank breaks in two at the rod bearing.

You are going to need to get the source of the noise located as close as is possible to the point at least a qualified tech can make a high confidence diagnosis and advise you of what your options are.

If you do not have a 2nd car you will need to make other arrangements to get around. Possibly seek out the lowest priced rental car. Budget used to offer pretty low rental rates. Be aware sometimes a small car that gets "good" gas mileage can be in high demand. I've actually gotten a full size pick up truck at a discount because everyone else wanted the econo box Honda and Toyota cars.

See if you can get the cost of the rental down by asking if the rental company offers a longer rental period, say maybe 30 days or whatever. Check online before you go. Sometimes the better deals are online. At the office they may not be aware of these.
 

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Please pull your valve covers and check your rocker arms. They may have gauled a lobe on the camshaft on either side. Ask me how I know.

Now, depending on your frame of mind, would you like the GOOD news, or the BAD news?

Greg
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Apparently so. Because, judging by the looks of disdain I’m drawing lately, I’d say no sane person would carry around a Cowboys door mat they found on the clearance isle to use as an oil drip catcher wherever they go in Dallas.

?????

982450


982451
 

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Any codes? Can you kill a plug individually and see which hole makes the sound lessen? I’ve heard of hung open fuel injectors causing “dieseling“ and making hard knocking sounds. Generally bottom end noises go from subtle to loud to bang-clunk. Can’t say I’ve ever heard of one change from subtle to loud and back to subtle repeatedly. Good luck!
 

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Any codes? Can you kill a plug individually and see which hole makes the sound lessen? I’ve heard of hung open fuel injectors causing “dieseling“ and making hard knocking sounds. Generally bottom end noises go from subtle to loud to bang-clunk. Can’t say I’ve ever heard of one change from subtle to loud and back to subtle repeatedly. Good luck!
on the V6 engines, one bank has the plugs covered by the intake plenum - I suspect one can't access the coil pack.

Otherwise, it would be possible to unplug the individual coil pack electrical connector to disable a given cylinder
 

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Good point, I need more coffee!

Videos can be difficult to diagnose sound origination and tone but to me, it sounds more like a common detonation knock than a not quite as common mechanical knock. No mention of fluctuating oil pressure but suggestions it’s speed dependent to aggravate the sound has me leaning away from the bottom end.

Heres what I’m thinking based solely on what’s been shared:
Idling in park where commanded fuel delivery will be at its lowest could make a hole predetonating sound pretty loud. Idling with the car in drive increases the fuel delivery to maintain idle while overcoming resistance helps the other holes overcome the “misfire”. Accelerating lowers fuel pressure as fuel is consumed and brings the knock back. Maybe my ears are deceiving me (wouldn’t be the first time) but that’s where I’m leaning and would start my troubleshooting. Thoughts?
 

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if the fuel trims were that far out of range or a misfire, either one of those would set MIL and codes for the condition. These engines employ knock sensors as well and if either of the two weren't working properly, they would set codes as well.

this is more likely a mechanical issue vs. ignition or emission system faults
 

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I agree codes should be present and there’s no mention of them but I’d try to eliminate everything I could before ordering a crate engine. Many a man has condemned on a preconceived diagnosis just to discover that rod or wrist pin they thought loose wasn’t in the engine they just pulled. Not saying anyone’s advice is wrong, just saying the worst that can possibly happen is a better place to finish than to start when troubleshooting. Enjoying the thread all the same!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Thansk
The noise in the latest clip can be explained by at cold start oil pressure is elevated and this tends to attenuate the noise. As the engine warms up the oil gets hotter and one result is at idle the oil pressure is low, maybe a bit under normal hot idle oil pressure because -- if it is a rod bearing -- this represents an internal oil pressure leak which will tend to drop hot idle oil pressure.

But as engine RPMs go up oil pressure goes up and this tends to attenuate the noise.

You are not going to listen the noise away. Someone will have to get his hands dirty.

In the meantime no good and potentially a lot of harm can come from continuing to run the engine. The rod can fracture. The crank rod journal can be scored beyond repair. Of the crank breaks in two at the rod bearing.

You are going to need to get the source of the noise located as close as is possible to the point at least a qualified tech can make a high confidence diagnosis and advise you of what your options are.

If you do not have a 2nd car you will need to make other arrangements to get around. Possibly seek out the lowest priced rental car. Budget used to offer pretty low rental rates. Be aware sometimes a small car that gets "good" gas mileage can be in high demand. I've actually gotten a full size pick up truck at a discount because everyone else wanted the econo box Honda and Toyota cars.

See if you can get the cost of the rental down by asking if the rental company offers a longer rental period, say maybe 30 days or whatever. Check online before you go. Sometimes the better deals are online. At the office they may not be aware of these.
Thanks for the advice, unfortunately the rental thing isn’t an option, hell even getting the thing diagnosed isn’t an option for me right now, have virtually nothing to put into it. Joining the army soon, so won’t be an issue for at least a bit while I’m at basic, but after that, we’ll see.
 

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ouch, that sounds like something from the rotating assembly in the engine’s bottom end, e.g. a rod knocking.

You need to start deciding how you want to handle it when that engine dies on you, and it will do it sooner rather than later I’m afraid.

You can likely find a used 3.5L at a local salvage yard to replace that one when the rod gives loose, or you can sell the car for whatever you can get (not much I’m afraid) and move on.

Honestly, the 3.5L is such an old and underpowered engine, replacing one in a 4K car like the Challenger with another engine just like it is ill-advised unless you are still paying the car off maybe.

But that’s getting into financial decisions that affect your livelihood, so I’ll stay out of that. Just know it is very likely, from the sounds of it, you will be making some financial decisions regarding that car pretty soon. ?

sorry to be Mr. Bad News...

Can you upgrade to the newer 3.6L V6 from the 3.5L V6? Or any other engine from the 2008-2010 Challengers for that matter..?
 

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Sounds like you have a rod knocking. I wouldn't start the car anymore until you get it fixed. If it was me, I would find a 5.7l Hemi engine and drivetrain to drop in it.

I like the sound of this 5.7L HEMI. You know where I could find one for sale (as well as drivetrain)..?
 

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I like the sound of this 5.7L HEMI. You know where I could find one for sale (as well as drivetrain)..?
Facebook marketplace I have found is a great place to start.
 

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Thansk


Thanks for the advice, unfortunately the rental thing isn’t an option, hell even getting the thing diagnosed isn’t an option for me right now, have virtually nothing to put into it. Joining the army soon, so won’t be an issue for at least a bit while I’m at basic, but after that, we’ll see.
You ever get this fixed or figure out what it was?
 

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Have a 2010 SE with about 96k miles on it, about a week ago it started ticking when I was accelerating, then it started doing it while idle (just at a lower volume), did some research and a lot of symptoms pointed towards spark plugs, and it was about time to replace them anyway, so I went ahead and did it myself, and the tick went away for about 24 hours, then it started all over again, just as bad, so today I tried an oil change, was about at 4K miles since I last changed it and it seemed to help for a minute, but now it’s just as bad as the first time it started, maybe even a bit worse. Need advice ASAP! Also yes I put the right oil in, and the right amount, and changed the filter.
The 3.5's are notorious for this. I believe it's cause is extended oil change intervals. I dont think I have seen anyone mention a "catch can". I run a catch can on all my vehicles. These 3.5's tend to gum up if oil changes are neglected. Also change your PCV regularly; this will also gum up your top end by not evacuating the crankcase and valvetrain of oil fumes if it gets plugged. I also always change my my oil max 4K miles. I am not nearly up to 90 K in miles but my other cars are over 200K with a small valve tick fix. Use at your own discretion...

I usually put Sea Foam in my engines about 100 miles prior to oil change. It definitely scrubs the engine. It also brought my 76 smallblock chevy back from burning oil (frozen rings from sitting to long) Also My LQ motor from valve ticking. For extremely dirty engines i'd add then 1K miles then change the oil. Cycle this 3 to 4 times / oil changes. As some have shown maybe too late as the wear is already present in the valve train Catch can is a really good investment. You would be surprised how much oil it catches that would have burned up in the combustion chamber causing carbon and possibly predetonation.
 

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new video example
I wouldn't bet on a rod knock. The bottom end of these engines are forged. If the oil light goes out, you more than likely have enough pressure. You can tell a worn engine by oil pressure but we have a dummy light which only lets us know that there is pressure or there is not pressure. More than likely your valve train is getting worn. Make sure to get your oil changed earlier and use synthetic with appropriate weight.
 
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