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Hello, I want to first state that I am brand new to this and hope that I am doing this right. Now that that is out of the way I would like to detail my problem. I am the proud owner of a 2012 Challenger R/T Classic who just happened to have the misfortune of having a heavy metal gate open as I was backing out of my drive way. I am stationed here in Germany and am skeptical about the outrageous repair quotes I am getting from the local German body shops. I happen to be a seasoned welder(8 years) for the Air Force and am more than competent in Metal working. The dent is a crease type, 1 foot in length on the rear drive side quarter panel, approximately 1.5 feet away from the gas cap. I have welded on various military equipment fuel housing items but those have all been purged thoroughly and do to my very minimized resources I cannot drop the tank for the purpose of welding to repair the dent. This thing is an eyesore and is making a gorgeous car kind of an eyesore. What is the probability of a safety accident occurring due to Mig'ing the area that I need? Any help would be greatly appreciated and once more I apologize if I posted this in the wrong area. V/R
 

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Use a sewer plug on the gas tank nozzle. Then check your LEL levels if you have a LEL meter. Should b fine. I work on a in service pipeline from time to time an we have been known to pack the pipeline from time to time with mud to seal it off from vapors. If we can remove the sewer plug we use that since it seals a lot better. The mud works great and will break up and get caught in the filters. Which won't work for your problem. But the LEL's are zero in both cases are we don't weld. And we are using stick rod. Just a different way to look at it. Hope it helps you out.
Thank you for giving me freedom with your service ! My son is in the Air Force also.
 

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Got a picture?

Confused as to why you are welding a 12" crease. :scratchhead:
 

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Basically I wanted to tack weld several tapered studs that I have turned on the lathe at several lengths of the dent. Slowly working the dent with a slide-hammer from the outside in.
 

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It doesn't sound like you are welding the tank itself, but just the metal of the exterior of the car. The tanks are probably plastic anyway.

A few obvious hazards I see.

Vapors from the gas tank are highly, highly flammable (and explosive). You need to be sure that the vapors are completely blocked from the welding area. I'm assuming you are keeping the gas cap on while doing the work.

Don't think you need an LEL meter for gasoline, if you smell it you don't weld, if you smell it during a weld you stop welding and back off. Your nose is more sensitive than an LEL gas meter at detecting gasoline. Your nose will "alarm" to it, long before an LEL meter will alarm to it. Different for vapors you can't smell of course, but I would consider gasoline obvious.

Heat build up in the gas tank is another hazard. But you'd need a lot of heat before it became a hazard. If you are not welding the tank, then it shouldn't be a problem. The best way to minimize concerns with heat is to ensure the tank is full of gasoline. Liquid disperses heat better than vapor.

Another trick is to use a large shop fan to blow any potential vapor away from the weld point. You'd be surprised how effective that is for localized work like this. The fan prevents the vapor getting to the explosive flammable level, keeping the vapors diluted.
 

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Don't weld , most modern dent pullers use glued on tabs and a slide hammer. Google it it's called PDR -paintless dent repair
Ditto. You should heed BB's advice.
 

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In the end a body shop is the better choice. The car will be good as new and if your repair doesn't turn out perfect it then will still need to go to a shop anyway. Good luck.
 

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Good luck.

When removing dents you want to duplicate the impact in reverse. Pull from the deepest part first, not from the edge in toward the center. Your biggest problem is going to be that the metal is stretched and with that light gauge metal you're in for oil canning. I can't imaging putting heat on something that thin to shrink it. Not an ideal scenario for the inexperienced.

A picture would be very helpful.
 

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Get a stud welder, they work great. They weld on those studs you slide hammer can pull, you then cut them off and grind the stub off. Haven't seen any of the glue on ones yet but they would be great here since there would be no heat or sparks.
 
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