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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got done wiring up turn signals inside the hood, behind the fake scoop inserts, and I am rather surprised it turned out as well as it did given the amount of Southern Ingenuity that went into getting it all to work.

But then again, this ain't my first rodeo with this particular mod, so I kinda knew what to expect going in...which is why I avoided LEDs altogether this time and stayed old school - incandescent all the way!!

Yeah, yeah, I know, that's not very progressive of me, but it was cheaper, easier, and the final product works better than my previous attempt with LEDs, so these are my turn signals now, and I'm sticking to them:

Land vehicle Vehicle Car Hood Bumper


Here's a couple of quick vid clips I did at the store to try to capture the effect in real-life mode without the glare of the lights killing the camera's view:

(no headlights; parking/turn-signals only) - https://youtu.be/jGlNwh0je-w


(headlights & foglights on; turn-signals mixed with parking) - https://youtu.be/UQeCam8yS7I


And the best part is, since I used the same bulbs my parking/blinkers use (4157NA), I now have two hot spares ready to go if I blow a regular blinker bulb somewhere out on the road. So now if I decide I want to start transporting guns and drugs, that'll be one less thing I have to worry about getting stopped for and busted!!

Although I just put it in print on a public forum that I might consider doing those illegal things, so that's probably not good if I ever do get nabbed...DANGIT!!

Back to earning money the legal, BORING, way...
 

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Nice, I want to do something like that to my '15 with LEDs but I am not an electrician. What problems did the LEDs give you?
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice, I want to do something like that to my '15 with LEDs but I am not an electrician. What problems did the LEDs give you?
There's a thread on here somewhere I posted up last year with the dirty details of doing them with LEDs, but I'm too lazy to search for it and link to it, so I'll hit the high notes of what I encountered when I did it on my 2011...

The problems aren't so much with hooking up some LEDs behind the scoops and making them blink, that is fairly straightforward (once you decided on how you are going to do it). The problems come in when you mix LEDs with the regular incandescent bulbs the car is already using. The LEDs will light up quicker and go out quicker than the regular turn signal bulbs, so the blinking will be out of sync between your original turn signals and the LEDs in the scoops.

It's actually a little cool looking at first, but that quickly wears off give you headache if you watch them blink out of sync for too long.

So to fix that, I opted to just replace the incandescent bulbs in the parking/blinker assemblies with aftermarket LEDs as well. That's no cheap deal there either, I can't remember what I paid, but it was something like $35 (for each bulb!). Now after I installed those in the parking/blinker assemblies, everything was in sync finally....HOWEVER, the LEDs don't have enough resistance (or is it too much? can't remember) for the car's CANBus monitoring algorithm. So after going all LED, the car thinks one of the bulbs is burned out and you get the "fast blink" crap all the time.

If you can live with that, then that's as far as you need to go. I couldn't, so I had to fix that by buying some little resistors to wire inline on the parking/blinker sockets to mimic the amount of resistance the regular incandescent bulbs have, thus fooling the car's CANBus monitoring, and eliminating the "fast blink."

While straightforward, that part was a pain...I ended up having to redo all the wiring on both sides once I had it all working because it was a bird's nest of patched in wires and electrical tape once I got done initially.

And don't even get me started on the rewiring...I ended up having to redo THAT too because I missed one connection...

But anyway, that's not really because of the LEDs, so you wouldn't necessarily have that issue, but it was a result of me trying to get all of the LED stuff to work, so I include it in the pain and suffering I went through going that route.

But this time around, I stayed with the incandescent, and man it was much simpler!

Oh yeah, there is the issue of brightness with the LEDs too...the bulbs I got to replace the regular blinkers/parking were a little too dim for my liking...they looked great at night, but during the day, they were borderline not good enough. But you can avoid that by choosing the right bulbs if you decide you want to do that (but they'll cost you!).

So in short, LEDs can work just as well, don't let me dissuade you from trying. But in my own personal experience, there were a lot of ancillary headaches that came along with the LED route that I didn't care to relive this time around.
 

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Thanks for the info. I have LEDs in my turn signals (2015) I was thinking those LED strips they sell everywhere but that may not look right. My LED turn signals are the brightest I have ever seen.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info. I have LEDs in my turn signals (2015) I was thinking those LED strips they sell everywhere but that may not look right. My LED turn signals are the brightest I have ever seen.
If you already have LED bulbs in the turn signal/parking assemblies, that will eliminate the majority of the headaches I described. Wiring in some extra LED strips won't be too bad, you will just need to identify the correct wires coming off the socket/pig tails and splice into them, that will give you the power and ground.

The hardest part will be figuring out how you are going to mount the LEDs behind the scoops. Oh yeah, and drilling out the scoops...getting that part right (or maybe satisfactory would be a better term there) was a little frustrating for me, but that was me, and your experience will vary of course.

I wouldn't worry about the technicality of the wiring stuff, if you're at home tinkering on cars, you'll be able to figure it out. I can provide you with the wire colorings that I know apply to 2010-2013ish, but you should definitely double-check to make sure they match for the 2015, as it sounds like things have changed a little in the latest body styles.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info. I have LEDs in my turn signals (2015) I was thinking those LED strips they sell everywhere but that may not look right. My LED turn signals are the brightest I have ever seen.
If/when you decide to tap into your turn signal/parking light wires, you'll want to make sure you have the correct wires in the harness identified for the current from blinkers. Haynes/Chiltons manuals are great for this sort of thing, but in their absence, you can use this website:

https://techauthorityonlinedemo.extra.chrysler.com/service/repair/wiring/view/classic.htm

Wiring diagrams out the wazoo on there; I'm really surprised to find that much info without paying for it...but hey, I won't tell if you don't!
 
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On my SRT8, I thought that the scoops provided cool air (I remember seeing a duct). However this mod is definitely unique and cool!

I've just put LEDs on all corners (barring the license plate lights) and hyper flash is something I'm living with, until I wire in the resistances. Just wanna be sure, before I go splicing away :)

Great work! Some more shots of the underside (of the hood) would be welcome.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On my SRT8, I thought that the scoops provided cool air (I remember seeing a duct). However this mod is definitely unique and cool!

I've just put LEDs on all corners (barring the license plate lights) and hyper flash is something I'm living with, until I wire in the resistances. Just wanna be sure, before I go splicing away :)

Great work! Some more shots of the underside (of the hood) would be welcome.
I have not done extensive research on the subject of the functional hood scoops, but I did spend an evening or two searching around and reading up on them (back while planning v1.0 w/ LEDs). And from what I could find back then, it seemed like the general consensus on the use of functional scoops was this:

1. Whether or not they were meant to channel cool air into the engine compartment from the outside, in reality they were not doing it...or were so poor at doing it as to be basically non-functional as cool air intakes.

2. They could be considered as generally positive (as opposed to not having them functional), but only when the vehicle was stationary or moving very slowly. And even then, all they did was to allow for an exit to hot air collecting in the engine compartment (which would normally just add to the dreaded heat-soak condition).

I didn't do any experiments of my own to validate those claims, but I did watch them really closely as I slowly closed the hood, and I can certainly see where #1 would be true. When the hood is closed, they are just too far back, close to the firewall, to provide any benefit from cool air they happen to channel in while moving at normal speeds.

So what that rather long-winded response is trying to say is that I would not worry too much about losing some performance suddenly by obstructing the functional scoops with some LED blinker contraption, as it is likely they were not providing any noticeable performance gain in the first place...unless you spend lots of time at the track and are concerned with holding onto every last lb/ft of torque in between runs.

---------------------------

I tried to take some pics of the guts of the whole setup when I finished that night, but there wasn't much light and they didn't turn out too well. I'll see if I can't snap some later after I get home that give an idea of what can be done with the wires, bulbs, etc.
 

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Like you said Nuke the functional hood scoops are designed to vent hot air from the engine to the outside from idle to low speeds. the scoops are not high enough in the air flow to take air in at speed. they have been shown to provide about a 10 degree cooler engine bay on average but for all intent they are basically cosmetic.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
...Some more shots of the underside (of the hood) would be welcome.
Here's a couple of pics of the assembly I cobbled together to hold the bulb:

Vehicle door Auto part Hand Glass Automotive exterior

Technology Vehicle door Electronics Electronic device Gadget


The assembly consists of a stop/turn/tail light socket (a.k.a. pigtail) from a Chevy p/u (early to mid 90s models) and a large rubber grommet like is seen on an engine firewall where the harness comes through. I believe these particular grommets were made for some Ford or something, but that's all I can remember about their original intentions at the moment. They just happen to have an inside diameter which is the same as the neck on the bulb socket, and more importantly big enough to fit into the semi-circle holes in the underside of the hood.


Here's a couple of pics of the assembly mounted into the slot in the engine compartment (in the hole where the functional scoops would normally come out).

Vehicle door Audio equipment Technology Bumper Automotive exterior

Technology Ceiling Wire


Mounting them like this puts the bulb standing straight up inside the hood, and behind the scoops, so that a direct line of sight through the scoops the is really what is seen from the outside (as opposed to reflected light in regular turn signals coming off the reflective material inside the housing).

You cannot see the bulbs' outlines from outside the scoops because the scoops have translucent plastic behind them to blur the image of the bulbs when lit up. That's as close as I could get to the glowing effect found in all other turn signals without coming up with some reflective housing to put inside the hood and behind the bulbs themselves.

Also, one other detail I should note: The pigtails have three wires, one for ground, one for blinking lights, and one for parking lights. Since I wanted these to be as bright as possible (allowing them to be seen in the daytime if possible), I wired the parking and blinking wires coming off the pigtail together and then spliced into the blinking hot wire from my car's turn signals. Now when these things illuminate, both filaments inside the bulb light up together, making them as bright as possible, and able to be seen in the daytime (although really only noticeable during cloudy or otherwise non-super-sunny days).
 
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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here's one more pic of the assembly that I wanted to attach but was limited by a post's attachment limt:

Amber Hand Fashion accessory Wood Glass

Also, it may not be clear from those pics what is the pigtail/socket and what is the grommet, so I figured I would try to make that a little more distinct. Here is the underside of both:

Technology Vehicle door Electronics Electronic device Gadget

Here is the same pic but with red arrows pointing to the grommet:

Technology Vehicle door Electronics Electronic device Gadget

And here is the same pic but with the socket outlined in blue:

Technology Vehicle door Electronics Electronic device Gadget


Hope that helps more than confuses....
 

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Did you drill the holes out in the scoop? Or is it thin material in there and the light shines through?
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Did you drill the holes out in the scoop? Or is it thin material in there and the light shines through?
I drilled the holes out. They are pretty easy to discern if you turn the scoops around and look at the backside. You can see the lattice impressions from the front side enough to show you where the holes need to start:

Metal


In v1.0 of this project, I used a regular drill bit (don't remember size, something small, maybe 1/4"?), but I clearly remember it was very difficult to get the holes well defined without overlapping into the lattice. So if I had any advice for someone trying this same thing, I would say that trying to waller (yes, I said 'waller') out the holes with a regular drill bit is just unruly at best, so I would advise against it where possible.

This time around, I used a funky little drill bit I got from Harbor Freight as part of a 3 pack of such bits that are made to cut laterally as well as cut vertically (like a normal drill bit would do):

Chain Tool accessory Metal

That little puppy made it much easier to drill out those holes and keep them relatively close to the edges of the lattice without digging into them. I don't remember what they are called, and I've cut off the top of the package I bought them in, but here is a pic of the package nonetheless if someone wants to try to find them on HF's drill bit aisle:
Tire Automotive tire Automotive wheel system Auto part

And as for the light diffusing material which I put on the back of the scoop inserts after drilling out the holes, I was initially at a loss on what to use. For v1.0 with the LEDs, I was able to use some plastic hanging hooks to both mount the LED strips and diffuse the light coming through the scoop, but that wasn't going to work here.

So after looking around the garage and seeing some tackle boxes I still haven't put to use since getting them for xmas one year, I settled upon the little plastic dividers that come with those tackle boxes that allow you to divide up the compartments into your own custom sizes:

Plastic Font Technology Hand Transparency

I cut up a few of those so that the pieces' height was the same as the back of the scoops, laid several of them across the back of the scoop so as to cover all of the holes through which light could shine, and then spot glued them with some super-glue to keep them in place come rain or shine.

There's a hefty amount of Southern Ingenuity involved in the whole project, I will fully admit, but I wanted to keep costs down by using things I already had laying around the garage, and I definitely accomplished that goal!

Besides, my reasoning for posting up the details in this thread (and the v1.0 one with the LEDs) wasn't to give anyone a detailed step-by-step per se, but more as an indication of what can be done if you just put a little thought into it and dig around your garage for the parts.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the info. I have LEDs in my turn signals (2015) I was thinking those LED strips they sell everywhere but that may not look right. My LED turn signals are the brightest I have ever seen.
Those LED strips commonly available at auto-parts stores will do, but you cannot just affix them to the back of the scoop inserts and go. When viewing from the outside, you will be able to see the individual LEDs light up on the strip(s), so you need some way to diffuse the light coming through the scoop to spread it out and make it appear to glow more like an actual turn signal would. Here's a pic of my v1.0 with LEDs to illustrate what I am talking about:

Automotive lighting Light Automotive tail & brake light Motor vehicle Lighting


Now to get that effect, I ended up using a bunch of little plastic hooks like what you put along the backside of your desk to route computer wires through to keep them out of site:

Light Lighting Automotive lighting Amber Light fixture


Another of the plastic clips with LED strip attached:

Cylinder Material property


That design worked well for nighttime driving, but it was not very visible during the day. That was okay for me, but if someone were expecting them to be useful during the day as well as night, they are going to need to either put more LEDs in the scoops or use brighter LEDs, and I'm not sure how feasible either of those is really.

It would be difficult to put enough of the standard strip LEDs in that small of an area to make them bright enough to see during the day. And if more powerful LEDs were found and used, I would be concerned with how bright they were during the night to oncoming traffic.

But I am sure there is a happy medium available out there somewhere, it's just a matter of finding it...
 
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