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Discussion Starter #1
I read a couple of posts about HOD and after perusing their website, decided to register for the July 27 event at NJ Motorsports Park. Anyone else planning to go? Unfortunately, I'm out of town for the May 22 event.

Any thoughts good, bad or otherwise from those who have HOD experiences?

Also, HOD will give a $40 credit certificate to an existing member who refers a first-time driver. Happy to have an existing driver "refer" me and get the credit.
 

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You will have a blast and be hooked!

Let usknow if you have any questions, we are big road track/hide fans here at speedlogix.

Do you have an rt or srt?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You will have a blast and be hooked!

Let usknow if you have any questions, we are big road track/hide fans here at speedlogix.

Do you have an rt or srt?

r/t

I need to speak with you about a hurst shifter
 

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Ok, a couplenof suggestions.

Make sure to replace your brake fluid with a higher temp fluid and bleed brakes prior to the event, this will help with brake fade.

Another suggestion would be some better brake pads for the track at minimum, if you end up doing this often you will probably end up upgrading brakes as well.

Let me know what questions you have on the shifter
 

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Being this is your first event out, I'd recommend keeping your instructor with you all four turns on the tracks -- if they are good. You can opt for solo events, but I learned so much more from mine keeping him the entire time. Listen to your instructor and make sure you ask questions if you have them. Even an observation of yours can lead to a learning experience.

Inspect your car throughly before going. Brake pads, fluid levels, etc. Be ready for a complete thrill and a few days of slower driving afterwards as your body readjusts to "normal" driving -- which will never be the same. This will give you so much of an advantage over other drivers it's not funny. Enjoy your time and be sure to post your thrill from it. ;) Photos required too. If you wana use me as a reference ... ;)
 

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Tonyl, I'll check my calendar. I have been thinking of doing one for awhile now, this is about 1 hr 20 minutes from my house. It would be my first time too...
 

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You will have a great time, I've done a couple of track days before. I want to stress on what SRT8U said on upgrading the break fluid, It's a must, your car is heavy and the OEM breaks aren't designed for performance driving. It happened to me once that the brake was almost gone after one session. One tip an instructor once told me was that as you drive around the track you have driving aides like esp and abs to make sure you don't lose control. So, whenever you feel the ABS or ESP kick in, you should know that you are doing something wrong and the computer corrected it for you. This way you will be able to evaluate the way you drive and work on areas where you need some improvements.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the great tips!

My ego would have screamed at me to go solo as soon as possible but it makes perfect sense to spend a day with an instructor. Sounds like upgraded brake pads and brake fluid changes are a no-brainer too.

Proximo, will register once I receive invite.
 

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It might be an okay idea to upgrade your brake fluid, but I've done track days for years without that. Depending on how many turns, and how hard you're braking, you'll likely not even come close to boiling your brake fluid.

Most first time track students don't even come close to using the braking potential of the car. If you're driving an SRT, you likely won't need to change anything; as indicated, I've done track days for literally decades and it took three sessions before I could pull a full g on the brake smoothly and still set up for the turns properly in my SRT.

Get plenty of rest the day before your track experience. Depending on how many sessions and how rigorous the course is, you'll see as much as a 30% to 50% student drop out by the fifth session if you're running that many. A large oval course isn't demanding; a full blown road course is very demanding.

Most people find themselves exceptionally tired at the end of the day; great idea to either stay nearby the night after the track or have someone else drive your car home.

Most tracks require a safety inspection of your car, if not, the session may not be that rigorous; you'll have a ton of fun regardless.

As you go through the sessions, pace yourself. Don't worry about hammering in the first session; get to understand the track, the lines, your braking, transition, apex and exit lines. Your fastest and most aggressive sessions should be your last two. Dedicate each session to nailing a particular part of the track; if you have four sessions, take three sessions to learn the track and the fourth to hammer.

If you're required to wear a helmet, use your own if you have one. You'll likely need to adjust your seat downward, and if you've never put a helmet on while in a car, you might want to practice that a few times before you get to the track; it's trickier than most folks think. I usually put mine on outside the car.

When you roll to a stop at the end of your session, let your car roll the last few feet. This will help ensure an air gap between the pads and the rotors which will be pretty hot. Pop the hood to help let the engine cool; you'll probably have an hour between sessions, sometimes less.

Arrive with half a tank or less of fuel. You can usually buy fuel at or very near most tracks. Don't bother with racing fuel as it's horrifyingly expensive and does very little for your car. Smells great though... : )

Take everything out of your car you don't absolutely need. This includes your trunk. The less stuff shifting around, the better. If you allow other people in your car, check under the seats; you'll be surprised at what rolls out under full braking sessions and it's a heck of a distraction if something is rolling around-- especially in the drivers area.

Tire pressure is critical; you may want to lower it by several pounds after your second or third session.

If you can hammer your car aggressively, you'll use up something like 1/4 to 1/3 of your tire's life at a single day track session.

Take lots of pictures and if possible have a friend or family person take pics of you on the track. Many tracks will have a track photographer who'll take pics- definitely recommend you link with them; it's an enormously memorable experience.

If you have an SRT, set your dash to show your g meter. That way you can see how you're progressing through the day. Here's mine from the last track session;



It's incredibly addicting. The SRT Experience is fun for those who've never done a track day, but it's nothing like spending a full day in your own car with an instructor. Way different and more interesting (and fun) experience.

Let us know how it worked out for you!!
 

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Good food internetguy! I didn't think about the hood while I was there. One additional thing to add is don't use your emergency brake when you park after any run. I forgot the exact reason other than what internetguy said about them being hot and you can damage your brake pads by setting them.

Tonyl, have you received the invite yet? I'll have to inquire if not.
 

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Track days and really any HPDE (High Performance Driving Event) is an amazing experience, I used to do a lot of them in everything from a civic hatch waay back in high school, to a couple RX-7's, to a VW GTi, a couple of swapped Subaru's, and now working my way into the motorcycle HPDE days... it's an immensely rewarding experience, and the tools you'll learn while you push your car to its limits (and your limits) are innumerable, and can come in handy on the street.

All the previous posters were certainly right on flushing fluids, I'm a firm believer of changing all of your fluids before and after the track day, just to keep the car/bike happy. It is kind of a pain, but after you've done it a couple times it becomes like a pre-race ritual that just gets you pumped (...or maybe it's just me!) and then the next day while you're looking at video or pictures/recovering/repairing (hopefully not!) it's a kind of post-race ritual.

However you go about it, it's going to be a blast! Welcome to the world of the track, and look forward to knowing your car better than you've ever known it before! Have fun!

-Zach
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Im going to make a cheat sheet of all these tips. Very helpful, guys.

No invite, Proximo.

dbmotors, I'm definitely going and will register this week. Will be out of town for the Aug 29 event so unless they add another date later this year, I'm one and done.
 
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