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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I figured I would make a new thread to consolidate my specific feedback regarding this mod as well as videos. The reason I did this mod is due to the extreme wheel hop that occurs with the 6spd Challenger. I have the stock F1 tires on it still and I found out soon after 500 miles when Launch Control enabled that I have a problem that needs to be dealt with. At approximately 1300 miles I went to the drag strip and on a prepped track the hop was 20 times worse than on the street. That tipped me over the edge to get the Stage I & II kit. I want to be able to enjoy my car, beat on it (it is an SRT afterall) and protect the drive line while I do it.


The Kit:

It comes in a shoe sized box, well packaged with all the parts wrapped for protection. It also came with a set of printed installation instructions as well as a document explaining how you should launch your car after the install of the mod is done. I preferred to use the online installation directions as that included pictures which helped. Particularly when it came to trimming rubber you could see how much specifically you should take off.


The Tools:

Car jack (lifting directly on the center differential with a piece of wood), jack stands, 3/8 drive socket wrench, 13mm deep well, 15mm deep well, 16mm wrench, 18mm short well, 19mm deep and short well (matching wrench sizes for the sockets) , small hammer to tap the sway bar bolt back as you back that nut off so the bolt doesn't come out with it, spring prybar (a simple $10 one from Home Depot), WD40 (I use Ballistol as it won't dry out rubber), pair of Kobalt work gloves, box cutter and....a steak knife. Yes, a steak knife...more on that later.


The install (I will touch on the highlights, otherwise just follow the directions online) :

The directions do not mention this, but you need to remove some plastic shielding forward of the rear tires which require that 13mm socket to remove. I don't see how else you could get to the front cradle mount otherwise. You'll see when you get under there and look where the front cradle mount is. With how you have to reach for it, I just removed the shielding to make life easier.

Following the directions the first couple of steps are not too hard removing the front cradle bolt and putting the sleeve tool on then reinstalling the bolt. I will say (for all the 18mm bolts) that if this is your first time loosening them up, you're in for a real treat breaking them loose. So if you have access to longer than normal socket wrenches to give yourself more leverage that would help a lot. I did not, I just broke them loose while cussing a lot.

The first major pain is removing the half plate from the front mount. I probably cranked on that thing for an hour with the pry bar trying every which way to get a solid angle on it to get it loose. I even went and rented a jaw puller from a local parts store to no avail (so don't bother). In the end I found that I was being too nice to it and I really had to get fussy with it for it to come off with the pry bar. WD40/Ballistol helps here hosing the area down to loosen things up. I don't know if it was because I had previously done some nasty wheel hop launches that really seized that half plate on there or what, but it was ridiculous.

After the plate is off you get to the first dreaded rubber trimming step that everyone warned is difficult. Honestly I did not have any trouble at all with this step because I used an old serrated steak knife to do the major work whacking off the large dimples. Then I used a box cutter knife for the precision work. Running the box knife blade all the way through the rubber, then perform gentle short stroke sawing motions proved to be extremely effective. In all I would say the rubber trimming work was the easiest step of this whole thing! The fact I just spent all my frustration on that half plate, perhaps the rubber trimming was a welcome change.

The directions also say to drop the rear exhaust hanger when working on the rear cradle mounts portion. Specifically it applies to the step when you put on the new shocks. I did not do this step. With a 19mm deep well socket you can easily get to the bolt when putting the new dampening shocks on. I do not have an aftermarket exhaust so I did not have to trim any bolts.


The Result:


As you can tell, the wheel hop is completely solved on the street. Part of me suspects there may be a little hop at the track given how tacky a properly prepped track is. However I expect 98% of the hop to be gone even there given I had zero hop on the street. The rear end feels extremely solid now. It is very easy to break the tires loose even under moderate acceleration...there is just no more give. You will feel the rear end squat ever so slightly and then it hits...you're on ice. I bought a news et of tires as well, the Michelin Pilot Sport AS3 and I love them!

Other Notes:

With everything in life, there is a trade off. First of all the car rides rougher. It essentially feels like Sport Mode is on all the time now. The nice cushy ride you were used to will be no more.

Also there is more pronounced drive line noise. Specifically if your car has the GetRag rear end howl. You WILL hear it more. However with your windows down cruising, or the radio on you will not hear it. This is ultimately up to your tolerance level of what is OK and what is not. It is the same thing with after market exhausts and drone. Drone will happen, but what you can tolerate may be different to another person.

Lastly I would say that shifting is louder. It's not harder (because the kit does nothing to the transmission or linkage), it's just louder. Again this doesn't bother me. I rather like the mechanical experience of it all.

Here is a video demonstrating the above notes regarding the kit:



Final Thoughts:

I love it! I can now beat on my car without worrying about the drive line taking undue punishment because of it. HopNot is extremely well made kit of quality material that I expect to last the life of the car. The only part that could wear out is the shocks. However given they aren't flexing nor load carrying shocks (like suspension shocks are) I figure they will last a long time. The kit cost $560 total and for the bang for your buck, it is immediate and felt every time you want it. If you want to get control of your wheel hop, this is a must buy kit.
 

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good review and basically my thoughts as well! i've had my kit on for 2 summers and a bunch of hard launches!
 

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I had similar results on the street. But don't expect it to be gone at the track. The surface prep is simply too sticky and the OE tires don't have enough sidewall give.
 
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