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Forbes has listed seven Mopars among the Hottest Collectible Cars:

1. Jeep Wrangler, MSRP: $26,995.

The original military-derived Jeep gets a long-awaited full redesign for 2018 that features welcome improvements in virtually every department, while retaining an only modestly modified version of its iconic upright look. Given its mass production numbers and predilection to get scuffed up while blazing off-road trails, we’d expect only early VIN-numbered examples, and rare trim/equipment combinations might eventually rise in value. At the least, the Wrangler has a reputation for bringing back the most cash at trade-in time.

8. Dodge Challenger SRT Demon, MSRP: $84,995.

The devilish Demon is a bona fide street-legal drag racer with as much as 840-horsepower under the hood, and a pair of extra-wide street-legal drag radial tires at the rear. It’s not cheap, but with only 3,300 expected to be built, and no 2019 version expected, this is virtually the definition of a collectible car.

9. Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk, MSRP: $86,000.

What’s not to like about a family friendly midsize SUV with all-wheel-drive that can otherwise light up the pavement with the 707-horsepower supercharged 6.2-liter Hemi V-8 from the Dodge Challenger and Charger’s scenery-blurring Hellcat models. That’s a winning combination, except for a sticker price that’s nearly three times the cost of a base Grand Cherokee.

28. Dodge Viper, MSRP: $89,090.

There’s probably never been a strong business case to build the rip-roaring Viper, but it nonetheless stands as the ultimate example of Detroit iron. There’s nothing the least bit rational about a big-on-the-outside/small-on-the-inside beast like this that packs an 8.4-liter V10 wallop, but nobody ever bought one to go to the grocery store. As Hagerty so aptly puts it, “If words like “bludgeon,” “eviscerate,” and “trounce” appeal to you, this is your car.

35. Dodge Challenger Hellcat, MSRP: $58,295.

The Challenger Hellcat takes the classic American muscle car formula to the extreme with its outrageous 707-horsepower supercharged V8 engine. Those wanting the same insane levels of performance in a sedan can instead choose the Hellcat edition of the Dodge Charger. Either way, the crazed cats should be coveted for years to come, provided one can avoid paying a profit-killing major markup over MSRP some dealers are commanding to obtain one.

44. 1984-2001 Jeep Cherokee

That’s right, you mom’s old SUV is becoming collectible. Hagerty says the Cherokee’s rugged styling makes it is more appealing to younger buyers than Ford Explorers of the same era. It’s also both plentiful and affordable in the resale market, with a 2000 example estimated to go for $7,600-$10,400.

51. 1996-2002 Dodge Viper GTS

One of the most outrageous domestic sports cars ever built, the Dodge Viper helped bring Chrysler back to prominence, both for its V10-flavored performance and its heavy-handed muscular styling. It was lacking in terms of comfort and sophistication, compared to other sports cars at the time, but gave no quarter in terms of heart-pounding acceleration. Hagerty says you can grab a 1997 version for $47,800-$55,900.

Hottest Future Collectible Cars
 

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Semantics. I wouldn't say its misleading. I guess they could have used the term 'vehicles' but 'cars' is simpler and easier/quicker to say/read.

But I can see your point too. I have a Ram as well and somehow my 5 year old daughter is constantly correcting people that "its a truck" when they talk about 'dads car'
 

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Semantics aside, do you agree with the selections?
Nope. Demon and viper are the only collectibles on that list. New Wranglers collectible? No. Older ones, yes. Cherokees. Maybe. Great offroaders, but I wouldn't consider them a collectible. Hellcat /Trackhawk, nope. If it's still being made ( I ) don't think they're collectible.
 

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the current production Wrangler? collectible? - they're building ~ 240k per year.

unless production stopped and 40 years' time went by, maybe. There's thousands of them out there
 
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"At the least, the Wrangler has a reputation for bringing back the most cash at trade-in time".



Agreed, they do hold their value really well but would be somewhat reluctant to associate them with the term collectible, considering the production numbers mentioned...






HOT ROD ON
 

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Car: a road vehicle, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal combustion engine and able to carry a small number of people.

Will have to be changed as EV fit the bill too ;)

A Guy
 

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I guess it depends on what you consider collectible, and the reason you're collecting. Since the article is from Forbes, it's focused on gaining value or not losing much, which is what financial experts would call investing. Investing isn't the same as collecting. It's not that much different from flipping. From that standpoint, yeah, those cars make sense, but only while they're hot. In that way you can think of cars as badly-performing stocks that require storage and maintenance.

If you're collecting because you love the cars, you're gonna collect what you love, and who gives a rip if it makes money. IMO this is the way to do it.

Rarity drives value because so many collectors are competitive. They don't care how that Hemicuda convertible drives, they only want it so nobody else can have it. The only miles those cars ever see is when they roll across the auction block, and that's just sad.

TL;DR: Demon A+, Vipers A, Hellcats B-, Wrangler D.
 

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"At the least, the Wrangler has a reputation for bringing back the most cash at trade-in time".



Agreed, they do hold their value really well but would be somewhat reluctant to associate them with the term collectible, considering the production numbers mentioned...






HOT ROD ON
part of that is while they're popular - buyers look for lease return or trade.

They're expensive > the cheapest Wrangler starts $26.6 (two door, base) to $46.9k Rubicon Recon 4 door and there's a lot of items are still extra cost options on top of that.

So that's why resale is high - buyers hold off buying as new.
 

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I would disagree on:

#1. Way too many Wrangler. A vehicle that is desirable, does not make them a collectable. Truck guys want a Tacoma, and used ones cost way too much. People want them, but does not mean they want to collect them.

#9 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk. That reminds me of a Dodge Omni GLH. There are fans, but no one is going to restore it as a collector car. The engine will be stripped out, and used somewhere else.
 
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