Dodge Challenger Forum banner

How Long Did Your MOPAR Battery Last?

  • Less than 3 years

    Votes: 5 20.8%
  • 3 years

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • 4 years

    Votes: 10 41.7%
  • 5 years or more

    Votes: 8 33.3%

  • Total voters
    24
  • Poll closed .
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,708 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How long did the battery last in your Challenger? Mine is 4 years' old and is having trouble handling the freezing weather.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,492 Posts
No issues with mine, but 3-5 years seems to be the norm for OEM batteries these days no matter what brand of vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Not Challengers per se' but the battery in the wifes Pacifica was 7 years old and still working when out of an abundance of caution, I replaced it last week because of the impending Polar Vortex. The batteries in my 2500 were 11 years old when I replaced them last year and yes, they were still working as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,212 Posts
Not Challengers per se' but the battery in the wifes Pacifica was 7 years old and still working when out of an abundance of caution, I replaced it last week because of the impending Polar Vortex. The batteries in my 2500 were 11 years old when I replaced them last year and yes, they were still working as well.
At that point I'd just keep going to see how long they actually could go. No, we never want to get stuck but that's a long time you had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
At that point I'd just keep going to see how long they actually could go. No, we never want to get stuck but that's a long time you had.

Hahahaha.....that's what I did at the nine year mark. I was going to replace them but figured, what the hell, let's see how long they can go. At 11 years they were getting long in the tooth so in the end I chickened out and though still working, replaced them with a pair of Odyssey dry cells ( to the tune of $265.00 a piece :cry:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,683 Posts
Does getting a battery load test tell anything useful? My battery is just under the 5 yr mark, but I recently got it tested. It came out as "good" rating (about 70% of rated CCA, if I understand the scale). I asked if I should be concerned about replacing it soon, and he said nothing to worry about for now. He also said that it is possible our batteries will live longer than "normal" because, being situated in the trunk, they aren't subjected to the regular/extreme heat cycling in the engine bay. What do you guys think?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,492 Posts
Does getting a battery load test tell anything useful? My battery is just under the 5 yr mark, but I recently got it tested. It came out as "good" rating (about 70% of rated CCA, if I understand the scale). I asked if I should be concerned about replacing it soon, and he said nothing to worry about for now. He also said that it is possible our batteries will live longer than "normal" because, being situated in the trunk, they aren't subjected to the regular/extreme heat cycling in the engine bay. What do you guys think?

i wouldn't necessarily have it tested for the heck of it, batteries have a finite number of cycles before they're depleted. The problem I usually have, though, isn't a battery that's reached the end of its life by being used up, but rather needing to be replaced due to a bad cell. Sometimes a cell shorts out or dies due to material shedding off of the plates and settling on the bottom, eventually shorting one or more cells, and sometimes a cell just fails.

Unfortunately, there's no way to tell when a battery is going to give up. Proactively replacing a battery doesn't guarantee that the new battery is going to last any longer than the one you replaced.

The heat theory makes sense as I can see how repeated thermal expansion/contraction could eventually result in an internal failure. We'll see how long my battery lasts, so far so good! :)


Sent from a cool, little device from the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Had a 300C before this for 7 years that i traded in for this, and never changed the battery. My Challenger lasted two. Figured being in the trunk helped the first one last, guess not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I got almost nine years out of mine. I replaced it more for peace of mind than anything else. I also wanted more CCAs because my car is very hard to start in the cold.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,691 Posts
I replaced mine last year after 4 years. It never actually died but it was showing signs of struggling.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,708 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Theoretically, batteries should last longer in the trunk because they are not exposed to high engine heat. Heat and vibration are the biggest causes of battery failure. That's why more failures occur during the summer.

Here is an informative article on the causes of battery failure:

When the active material in the plates can no longer sustain a discharge current, a battery "dies". Normally a car (or starting) battery "ages" as the active positive plate material sheds (or flakes off) due to the normal expansion and contraction that occurs during the discharge and charge cycles. This causes a loss of plate capacity and a brown sediment, called sludge or "mud," that builds up in the bottom of the case and can short the plates of a cell out. This will kill the battery as soon as the short occurs.

In hot climates, additional causes of failure are positive grid growth, positive grid metal corrosion, negative grid shrinkage, buckling of plates, or loss of water. Deep discharges, heat, vibration, fast charging, and overcharging all accelerate the "aging" process.

Approximately 50% of premature car battery failures is caused by the loss of water for normal recharging charging due to the lack of maintenance, evaporation from high under hood heat, or overcharging. Positive grid growth and undercharging causing sulfation also cause premature failures.

Normally well maintained and properly charged deep cycle batteries naturally die due to positive grid corrosion causing an open connection. The shedding of active material is an additional cause. If deep cycle battery is left discharged for long period of time, dendrite shorts between the plates can occur when the battery is recharged. The low resistance bridge in the shorted cell will heat up and boil the electrolyte out of the cell causing a high volumes of hydrogen and oxygen. That is why proper venting and ventilation is so important when recharging batteries.

Approximately 85% of premature deep cycle and starting batteries failures that are not recharged on a regular basis is due to an accumulation of sulfation. Sulfation is caused when a battery's State-of-Charge drops below 100% for long periods or under charging. Hard lead sulfate crystals fills the pours and coats the plates. Recharging a sulfated battery is like trying to wash your hands with gloves on.

In a hot climate, the harshest environment for a battery, a Johnson Controls survey of junk batteries revealed that the average life of a car battery was 37 months. In a separate North American study by BCI, the average life was 48 months. In a study by Interstate Batteries, the life expectancy in extreme heat was 30 months. If your car battery is more than three years old and you live in a hot climate, then your battery is probably living on borrowed time. Abnormally slow cranking, especially on a cold day, is another good indication that your battery is going bad. It should be externally recharged, surface charge removed, and load tested. Dead batteries almost always occur at the most inopportune times. You can easily spend the cost of a new battery or more for an emergency jump start, tow or taxi ride

Most of the "defective" batteries returned to manufacturers during free replacement warranty periods are good. This strongly suggests that some sellers of new batteries do not know how to or fail to take the time to properly recharge and test batteries.

Above article courtesy of batteryfaq.org
 

·
Registered
2019 Sublime Shaker and 2010 Detonator Yellow R/T Classic
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Mine was still working just at 5 years old but it was lagging bit on start-up so I replaced it just in case. I didn't want to get stranded somewhere just to see how long the battery might last. As a good rule of thumb expect to replace a battery every 4-5 years regardless. Yeah some might last longer, some I had go bad after a year or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
My challenger has over 5 years on its battery but my 04 ram has its original battery in it. That is 10 years. My mechanic says it is producing some gassing which he says indicates the battery is weak. He knows I am trading it in June, so he said to roll the dice. It started ok last week during the arctic vortex, maybe a little slow but the wind chill was -36.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
2011 srt8 GWE 5000 miles I was hearing a thumping noise from the woofer in the trunk and figured that was killing my battery and took it to the dealer, they said it needed a software update. Seams to be working now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,059 Posts
I started driving in 1972, and for a long long time, I got two years, that's it, out of every battery I had. If I went past that without changing it, and I always did, I got burned and had to be jumped, and in one case, had to walk to a store and buy one. That was a long walk back the mile and a half with it. When I bought my 2003 Ram, I rolled the dice and it lasted 5 years, until I traded it on my 2008 Charger R/T. My present car turned 3 years old at the end of November. Since the battery isn't subject to the heat it would have under the hood, I'm going to gamble again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,338 Posts
challenger still had original when I traded it.

my 2001 Ram that I bought in 2000 factory battery was replaced in 2012 after 135,000 miles
my 2004 Ram that I bought in 2003 still has the factory battery after 97,000 miles.

Why are you asking?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top