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2016 R/T
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I just installed a new camshaft and springs this weekend and have a few good stories for later, but first I have an issue I was hoping to get input on.

Tomorrow I'll be putting the crankshaft damper on. The forum tells me I'll be torque'ing the crankshaft damper bolt to 130 lb ft and I've got my torque wrench dialed in for that, but how will I stop the crank from rotating while I do it? My car is an automatic, so I can't just put it in gear to prevent rotation. The generic guidance is you stick something through the damper that catches on the block to prevent rotation, but I don't see anywhere where that can be done. I've attached a photograph of the front of the block, the only protrusions are these 3 short fins that stick radially outward from the crankshaft hole, but I don't know that it would be wise to be prying against them with 130 lb ft.

On the other hand, I've found a specific tool that is designed for this specific operation, Miller 10386. Is everyone doing this job buying this tool, or is there a more common means of tightening this damper on the crankshaft? I don't see people mentioning this step at all in their videos or guides, which leads me to think I must be missing something obvious.

The crankshaft damper looks like this for reference: 2011-2021 Mopar Crankshaft Damper 53022413AA | Steve White Parts

Any advice would be much appreciated, thanks!
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Preston
 

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I just recently pinned my crank and I used a large flat blade screwdriver to stop the rotation. If lying under the car you can do by yourself or if you've got an extra set of hands they can torque while you hold the screwdriver. Take the access cover off at the trans and stick the screwdriver in between the teeth of the flywheel and it can be done!


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usually with an automatic, you'll get a couple of cylinders on their compression stroke and that should be enough to be be able to get the crank damper bolt tightened down.

alternatives are to remove starter and block the teeth on the flex plate ring where the starter engages

another would be to use an electric impact gun (if you don't already have pneumatic tools)
 

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No need to remove the starter, that's what that access panel is for on the front side of the tranny. It's a black panel that allows plenty of room to get a pry bar or screwdriver in the to stop the rotation. Also while yes a copule of cylinders on compression stroke may be enough to tighten the bolt down it's definitely not enough to torque it. But aye don't take my word for it, I only just recently went through this. 2x actually, when my buddy came by to pin his crank. Good alternatives though for sure!


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Hi all. I just installed a new camshaft and springs this weekend and have a few good stories for later, but first I have an issue I was hoping to get input on.

Tomorrow I'll be putting the crankshaft damper on. The forum tells me I'll be torque'ing the crankshaft damper bolt to 130 lb ft and I've got my torque wrench dialed in for that, but how will I stop the crank from rotating while I do it? My car is an automatic, so I can't just put it in gear to prevent rotation. The generic guidance is you stick something through the damper that catches on the block to prevent rotation, but I don't see anywhere where that can be done. I've attached a photograph of the front of the block, the only protrusions are these 3 short fins that stick radially outward from the crankshaft hole, but I don't know that it would be wise to be prying against them with 130 lb ft.

On the other hand, I've found a specific tool that is designed for this specific operation, Miller 10386. Is everyone doing this job buying this tool, or is there a more common means of tightening this damper on the crankshaft? I don't see people mentioning this step at all in their videos or guides, which leads me to think I must be missing something obvious.

The crankshaft damper looks like this for reference: 2011-2021 Mopar Crankshaft Damper 53022413AA | Steve White Parts

Any advice would be much appreciated, thanks!
View attachment 1017831
Preston
The easiest way is to put two rods thru the holes in the damper and slip a pipe thru and hold it that way. another option is put the belt on and have someone turn the belt tensioner to hold it tight while you torque it. Also if you hold a heat gun on the damper you can expand it enough to slip right over the crankshaft without any special tools
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The easiest way is to put two rods thru the holes in the damper and slip a pipe thru and hold it that way. another option is put the belt on and have someone turn the belt tensioner to hold it tight while you torque it. Also if you hold a heat gun on the damper you can expand it enough to slip right over the crankshaft without any special tools
Hey man, thanks for the reply, I really appreciate it. We (Dad and I) actually took care of it earlier this morning, but I'll share my experience for future readers. We did use the heat gun method, which worked exceptionally well. We weren't sure what temperature would be required to sufficiently expand the hole, so we periodically checked the temperature with an infrared thermometer and tested the fit until it finally slipped on. We're having trouble remembering/agreeing on what the final temperature was... Dad thinks it was 260 F while I thought it was closer to 360 F when it finally went on, but it was certainly around 15 minutes of heating.

After it went on, we made sure it was seated flush on the crank snout, then we went to tightening other bolts while it cooled and contracted. Not sure if it would have mattered, but it seemed like it should be left to cool before we put the bolt on, to make sure it had contracted fully before the bolt potentially exerted force that may resist where the damper wanted to contract to. When it came time to tighten it, I had noticed that my impact driver was only capable of exerting a maximum of 150 lb ft of torque, so we just gave it a few healthy rattles.

Several hours later the car is running and now its with my tuner. Will make a follow-up post to report numbers and share the rest of my experience with the job.

Thanks!
Preston
 
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