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2019 Hellcat Red Eye Widebody
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Discussion Starter #1
All,

I'm pondering whether to buy a 2019 Scat Pack Wide Body or 2019 Hellcat Redeye Wide Body, whichever one it will be factory ordered in about a month. Haven't owned a muscle car since high school when I had a pretty low powered, but still pretty throaty with glass packs 65 Mustang with the 260 V-8 (built in 64 before they upped the displacement to 289). Had a lot of fun in auto shop playing with that car. Been driving family trucksters and Subarus ever since, but now ready to take the plunge into modern MOPAR heaven.

I'm wondering if experienced muscle car owners, or people with some financial savvy, might care to comment on this hypothetical question.

If someone could pay cash for a $56,000 Challenger Scat Pack, or $86,000 Hellcat Redeye, the difference would be parking $30,000 in the Hellcat Red Eye versus a bank, or other kind of investment. Banks are paying nothing in interest right now and 30k might earn $150 in interest annually, stocks carry risk, and it's not enough money to buy rental property. The flip side of low interest rates is these cars might be bought with an acceptably low rate and possibly people could afford the monthly payments, in which case the following math still pretty much works. So if this enthusiast kept either car for 10 years and averaged 5,000 miles/year, in 10 years the car would have 50,000 miles. Assume both cars would look awesome and be in great condition, etc - a loved car. I'm just guessing that the depreciation might be 40% for such a nice Scat Pack, and because of its relative rarity/desirability that the Red Eye similarly equipped might not depreciate as much. Uhh, let me reach around here...say 26%. It might not even lose that much value, especially if inflation kicks off and future cars cost a lot more - or the government or the economy or the larger car market causes these big block, high HP cars to stop being made en masse and they become even more prized collector items like our older muscle cars. If it was 40% for the the Scat Pack it would lose $22,400 in value and be worth $33,600. If it was 26% for the Red Eye it would lose $22,360 and be worth $63,640. They'd both lose the same dollar value, and so the yearly average cost of owning each car for 10 years is the same - $2,240. There is a higher insurance cost to the Red Eye - I'm hearing about double the Scat Pack's $760/year - but let's just talk about parking the money in these cars, and assuming a low lost opportunity cost of doing something else with the $30,000. My point is, especially if paying cash, that there is relatively little financial risk to buying the Red Eye. If the cost of ownership would likely be the same, why not buy the apex predator among 2019 Challengers and enjoy owning it? Of course, paying cash is impossible for many people, but I'm lucky enough to have saved up from all those family trucksters and inexpensive Subarus to do it.

Of course I could be wrong! A Red Eye's future value might do something unforeseen by my "never owned an expensive car" eyes. It's a question of relative depreciation.

If this appeals as a topic of discussion please throw in your two cents worth. Joining this forum and hearing the thoughts of more experienced owners and drivers who have bought and sold these kinds of cars before can give me perspective.

Thanks!

Finface
 

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Sounds like a seat of your pants decision! and I don't mean your wallet! My T/A 5.7 kind of leaves me wanting a wide body scat in plum crazy that is until I look at mine, get in and go!!! I think most everybody on here is happy with their Challenger decision
 

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I payed cash for my wide body scat ($49605) and it was the best investment I have made in years!!!!!

I have scrimped and saved and worked my ass off and I finally said WTF!!! It's my Time!!

I'm 58 and have raised my kids, Helped them through college and to get into nice houses (youngest is still going to need remodel help) but at some point you have to look at your expendable income and figure out what would be a good thing to do for yourself.

Just my opinion but I have had so much fun with this car and I haven't even had it thru track season yet!
 

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I would not buy the car with any kind of expectation that it would refain 40% of it’s value 10 years from now. 10 years from now gas might be $15 a gallon, the economy in the dumps, etc.

Get the car because it is the car you want
 

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When I acquired my Scat Pack last April, I decided to pay cash for it instead of using a low interest loan that my CU was offering. I saved $3k in interest over the required 72 months for the loan. I decided to make monthly payments to myself so now I am replacing the funds by depositing $$ into the account that I used to pay for my Challenger.

I will be 76 next month so it is now or never and I have enjoyed every minute behind the wheel of my Scat Pack even though I only drive it on the weekends. As far as resale 10 years down the road, I wouldn't count on it retaining that much value. Maybe after 25 years it will start to appreciate. I collect cars for the enjoyment of owning and driving them & trying to rationalize that they are an investment may be a stretch. They are only worth what someone is willing to pay for it when you are ready to sell.
 

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:wink3:s
I payed cash for my wide body scat ($49605) and it was the best investment I have made in years!!!!!

I have scrimped and saved and worked my ass off and I finally said WTF!!! It's my Time!!

I'm 58 and have raised my kids, Helped them through college and to get into nice houses (youngest is still going to need remodel help) but at some point you have to look at your expendable income and figure out what would be a good thing to do for yourself.

Just my opinion but I have had so much fun with this car and I haven't even had it thru track season yet!
YOU GO GUY!!!!!!! That's what I'm talkin bout
 

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Besides the depreciation/appreciation issue, do you plan to race the Redeye? If not, its 797 hp. is major overkill for the street. You will be very happy with the 392 Scatpack. Its 485 horses (and mid 12-seconds quarter mile time) is more than enough power to get you into trouble. In addition, you will save over $30,000.
 

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2019 Hellcat Red Eye Widebody
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the comments and observations so far!

I'm 62, and like Decay my kids are grown and on their own and I've checked the financial boxes needed to stop working in a few years. Decay, your wide body Scat looks great.

I agree it's a stretch to count on any car holding much value, but I thought this "thought experiment" about the "carrying cost" of the more expensive car not working out to be as bad as one might initially think was worth seeking some advice about. Not planning on racing the car, but maybe, somehow, I'll find a way to take it on a closed track and get some instruction in driving for myself and my wife. There are no tracks within a three hour drive from me however - closest is Putnam Park in Indiana.

Hope more owners will chime in.

Best,

Finface
 

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All of what you offer is purely hypothetical and probably won't happen.

The biggest expense to owning a car is depreciation.


Really you are better off assuming whatever car you buy will depreciate at about 10% a year this from the dealer's cost, too, not the MSRP for some years after you buy the car. This depreciation curve is more real world. If the car doesn't depreciate this much you get to enjoy the result of being too pessimistic.


You dismiss putting the difference between the Scat Pack vs. the Red Eye into stocks because stocks "carry risk" but overlook the fact either car you buy will depreciate a great deal over a span of time that could see the stocks - in a low cost mutual fund -- increase in value on average 6 to 7%.

Back in 2016 the 2 stock trading days after the Brexit vote I put a total of $75K into a mutual fund that tracks the S&P 500 index and that $75K is up. How much? Well, the S&P 500 index was down to 2037 6/22/2016. It is currently at 2716. That is about a 33% increase. Thus that $75K is now up to $100K.

Cars are almost always a lousy investment. (The only "vehicle" I came near breaking even with was my 1974 Harley Sportster. I bought it new for $2600. A year later with around 6K miles on it I sold it for $2600. Had I had a crystal ball back then I would have taken that $2600 and bought H-D stock. On 7/11/1986 the stock was at $0.43 (price adjusted for stock splits). It reached a high of $73.74 on 11/17/2006. That $2600 would have bought 6000 shares that would have been worth around $445K had the shares been sold at the peak.)



My approach to buying a car is to figure out what I want, what price I'm looking at paying for the car, setting some upper limit -- and below MSRP -- of what I'd be willing to pay for the car.

After I buy the car I give it good servicing. This includes early vital fluid servicing.

Then I just use/enjoy the car. This doesn't involve thrashing the heck out of the car but it does involve using the car in sometimes spirited fashion, if you know what I mean. My usual mind set is when I buy a car I do so with the idea of keeping it forever so I avoid subjecting the car to severe/abusive usage.


This also means I don't track the car nor do I modify the car.


I continue to give the car good servicing, at least on the factory schedule and often times at a more aggressive schedule.

When things go wrong I have these addressed pronto. I keep records so if I decide to sell the car I can show it was "loved".

I keep the car clean inside and out. There is no food or drink or pets or smoking allowed in the car.

Still depreciation is steep. Couple of examples: Paid around $16K for a new 2002 VW Golf TDi. In 2007 sold it with 150K miles for a bit over $9K. Don't recall what I paid for my 2006 GTO I bought new in 2007 but it was less than sticker, which was around $32K IIRC. In early 2009 with the GTO having just under 50K miles and in very very good shape traded it in for a new 2008 Cayman S and receiving $15,500 trade in allowance. (The Cayman S was marked down $12K from $62.6K to $50.6K.)

Things can go wrong, though. I bought the Cayman S with the idea I'd drive it a couple of years -- and avoid putting big miles on the car during that time -- then trade it in for maybe a Porsche Turbo. Four weeks after I bought the Cayman S it was totaled when hit by another car. After the dust settled and I had the money in hand from the other driver's insurance all the good deals on Caymans were gone. (Given the discounts being offered no wonder.)

However, I found and bought a pristine 2003 996 Porsche Turbo with under 10K miles with a 2 year, 100K mile CPO warranty. Might mention that I paid less than 1/2 the car's MSRP of $120K, this for a 6 year old car with an average of just 1666 miles per year on it. Depreciation is a *****.



My plan was to drive the Turbo a couple of years and then trade it in for a newer model car. (All this time I had a 2002 Boxster which I would use for my work commute and errands and such.)

But not even 2 weeks later out near Ely NV hit a mule deer with the Turbo. Got it repaired -- $25K worth -- but its resale value/trade in value tanked. So I just kept it and drove it until finally I tired of it (and the Boxster which had 317K miles) and sold both in late 2017 after I bought a 2018 Scat Pack and a 2018 Mini JCW.

(Two months after I bought the Scat Pack I traded it in for a 2018 Hellcat.)

My advice in these situations is you can buy anything you want but the purchase shouldn't hurt. That is you don't want a nice car in the garage that keeps you awake at night worrying about how you are going to pay for it or worrying about what you are going to have go without to afford the car.

You should have a good retirement savings plan going. You should be debt free, although a mortgage is acceptable, provided the interest rate is reasonable. If you have kids, they should have college savings plans funded. If you have a family you should have good term life insurance just in case. You need a good fraction of your annual income in cash for just in case. (There was a thread a while back about a Hellcat owner who was facing having to sell his car due to the lack of a paycheck arising from the government "shutdown". You don't want to be in that position.)

As an aside, I can tell you from experience that going from bringing home a very good salary to "living" on unemployment is no fun. Back in Sept 2014 I was laid off. I went from a high tech salary to unemployment which was $1800/month. This didn't quite cover my rent, utilities. It did not cover at all the $1300 or so COBRA payment I had to make every month. (Once before when I was laid off I bought a major medical insurance policy with a high ($7K or so) deductible. I don't recall the premium now but it was quite affordable. If I got the flu and had to see a doc I'd have to pay for this out of my pocket. No biggie. But if I broke a leg and had to be hospitalized after the deductible insurance would cover the rest. But the "Affordable" Care Act, aka Obama Care, eliminated that kind of insurance.)

Fortunately I had a good cash reserve and used this. It gave me the ability to be a bit choosy regarding job offers. As it turns out my ex-employer hired me back after 6 months and 3 days -- but hey, who's counting -- at the same salary, benefits, even the same office and phone extension. I did get a new office PC.

In short you need to have all your financial bases covered. Until I did I bought less expensive cars and in many cases maintained them myself to save even more money.

Then you buy whatever car you want, can afford. As I touched upon above you want to give the car good servicing. Treat it right. Don't abuse it. Don't mod it. If after X number of years if you want to sell or trade in you have done all you can within your power to keep the car's value up. But you will still pay for the "use" of the car in the amount of depreciation the car will have experienced over time.
 

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All,

I'm pondering whether to buy a 2019 Scat Pack Wide Body or 2019 Hellcat Redeye Wide Body, whichever one it will be factory ordered in about a month. Haven't owned a muscle car since high school when I had a pretty low powered, but still pretty throaty with glass packs 65 Mustang with the 260 V-8 (built in 64 before they upped the displacement to 289). Had a lot of fun in auto shop playing with that car. Been driving family trucksters and Subarus ever since, but now ready to take the plunge into modern MOPAR heaven.
I would advise you and your wife to test drive a 392 Scatpack. You'll find that its 485 hp. is more than enough power for you. It will be nothing like the cars you have previously owned.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Rockster,

Your observations and history are much appreciated. I agree the stock market is the best long term investment we have, and index funds made sense for several reasons. My point is that I could take the 30K, buy the market, and see a very sudden 50% loss. This having happened a couple of times in my lifetime. But you are 100% correct for the long term. All of your advice struck me as rock solid, but what else would we expect from Rockstar *grin*.

Thanks especially for the run down on the cars you've owned - exactly what I was hoping for. Wishful thinking...ah, yes... So unless phenomenally lucky like last year's Demon buyers who have seen a 50-60% increase in the value of their cars even an optioned Hellcat Redeye is unlikely to go up, much less retain, initial value. I pulled 26% depreciation out of my *** thinking it would be less depreciation than a lesser model, and it turned out to be the same dollar loss over that time period. What you're, and others, are saying is plan on 50% depreciation. Which makes the more expensive car a bigger loss, of course.

I also appreciate the basic car enthusiast advice given so far. In essence, if you can afford it and sleep at night buy what you want. And buying what I want is what my research, and your experiences that you guys care to relate, is the critical decision.

YouTube Video break time! (If you have time). I've been scouring the internet for Challenger videos, concentrating on 2019 Scat Packs and Hellcats. Look what I found today! I'm thinking this must be very new. If you can stand to watch two young "influencers" that my 62 year old eyeballs can only just tolerate (impending old fogey status acknowledged) actually crash a Go Mango Hellcat Redeye during their "review", check it out. If no time, start at 12:30 into the video. If a little time start at 9:00 when they first hit it and don't crash. If you're about my son's age you'll probably like the whole video. They are enthusiasts so I'm not knocking them too much. BUT, to Cuda340 and other posters who suggested my wife and I test drive a 2019 Scat Pack Wide Body and that the 485 HP would be more than enough fun on the street? Ummmm, that might be the best advice I've ever been given. But, dang, that Hellcat Red Eye is something else in addition to a potential death trap!


Might have to cut and past that link.

Thanks again for posting. I'm all ears.

Best,

Finface
 

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Rockster,

Your observations and history are much appreciated. I agree the stock market is the best long term investment we have, and index funds made sense for several reasons. My point is that I could take the 30K, buy the market, and see a very sudden 50% loss. This having happened a couple of times in my lifetime. But you are 100% correct for the long term. All of your advice struck me as rock solid, but what else would we expect from Rockstar *grin*.

Thanks especially for the run down on the cars you've owned - exactly what I was hoping for. Wishful thinking...ah, yes... So unless phenomenally lucky like last year's Demon buyers who have seen a 50-60% increase in the value of their cars even an optioned Hellcat Redeye is unlikely to go up, much less retain, initial value. I pulled 26% depreciation out of my *** thinking it would be less depreciation than a lesser model, and it turned out to be the same dollar loss over that time period. What you're, and others, are saying is plan on 50% depreciation. Which makes the more expensive car a bigger loss, of course.

I also appreciate the basic car enthusiast advice given so far. In essence, if you can afford it and sleep at night buy what you want. And buying what I want is what my research, and your experiences that you guys care to relate, is the critical decision.

YouTube Video break time! (If you have time). I've been scouring the internet for Challenger videos, concentrating on 2019 Scat Packs and Hellcats. Look what I found today! I'm thinking this must be very new. If you can stand to watch two young "influencers" that my 62 year old eyeballs can only just tolerate (impending old fogey status acknowledged) actually crash a Go Mango Hellcat Redeye during their "review", check it out. If no time, start at 12:30 into the video. If a little time start at 9:00 when they first hit it and don't crash. If you're about my son's age you'll probably like the whole video. They are enthusiasts so I'm not knocking them too much. BUT, to Cuda340 and other posters who suggested my wife and I test drive a 2019 Scat Pack Wide Body and that the 485 HP would be more than enough fun on the street? Ummmm, that might be the best advice I've ever been given. But, dang, that Hellcat Red Eye is something else in addition to a potential death trap!

S3 Gets a 797 HP Hellcat Redeye... And Wrecks It.. - YouTube

Might have to cut and past that link.

Thanks again for posting. I'm all ears.

Best,

Finface
Yes, you could put $30K in the market -- a good index fund that is diversified -- and see the market "tank" and the money drop maybe 50%. The 2008 "crash" had me down quite a bit. The S+P 500 went from a 1282 on 8/29/2008 to a low of 683 on 3/6/2009.

But I didn't sell. But also for a while I didn't bother to check my mutual fund balances. But I kept adding money to my accounts, dollar cost averaging.

My time horizon was quite far out and in spite of the severity of the drop I believed it to be a rather short lived drop which I thought would pass by the time I needed the money. By 3/18/2011 the S&P 500 was nearly -- just a few dollars shy -- of where it was back on 8/29/2008. Nearly 3 years is not necessarily what people would call a short time but looking back it did go by rather quickly. And all the time I kept on investing some percentage of my paycheck every month. There were dividends too that were reinvested.

From there the S&P 500 went on to gain even more. From its low of 683 to a recent (2/1/2019) high of 2706 the market is up around 290%.

It remains to be seen how Demon prices will do in the future. It is too early I think -- except for those few who got in at maybe MSRP or not too much above and then flipped the car or cars for more than they paid after just a short time -- to call the Demon a good investment.

Really though for 99% of the cars (and this might include the Demon) they are not investments, but a depreciating asset. Often cars that do appreciate do so only after the original owner -- or the 1st several owners -- have sold the car on. There is an expense of keeping a car pristine for 10, 20, 30 years with the hope its increase in value will justify the time and expense. If (big if) the car appreciates in value it is still a hard way to make money.

The advice to consider instead of a HC or RE a new Scat Pack is good advice.

My Scat Pack was a nice car. I was probably (probably?...) "wrong" in trading it in after just 2 months but at the time I had convinced myself to keep it to have 3 cars: Scat Pack, JCW, and then a Hellcat; was not for me. That was then. Now I can tell you I wish I had kept the Scat Pack.

The 392 engine is a nice piece of work. Not Hellcat engine nice but well suited for its power output and intended use.

And since depreciation is the biggest expense of owning a car a depreciation curve that starts at $40K vs. one that starts at around $65K (or way more in the case of a RE) sees one losing less to depreciation. 'course, even if I kept the Scat Pack I would have still bought the HC so I would have had the depreciation of the HC's value too.

The Scat Pack is more an every day car than the Hellcat. Sure the HC can be driven every day -- I toy with the idea of selling my JCW and buying a 2nd Hellcat so I can drive one every day -- but really that ain't going to happen. The HC (and in this regard so too the Scat Pack as the two cars are the same size as near as I can tell) is a bit of a problem when it comes to navigating tight parking lots, parking. This is where the JCW comes in very handy and I try to use it for all errands that require I visit and park in a parking lot.

I don't recall gas mileage with my Scat Pack, but with my HC gas mileage sucks -- I get barely 15mpg (by way of comparison the JCW gets 30mpg+ being driven the same way as the HC) and while keeping the HC fuel tank full is not a hardship having to fill up the gas tank 2 maybe 3 times a week (as my only car the HC would see over 300 miles per week) really sucks. Might add here in CA I'm paying $3.499/gallon for Shell V-Power and crude prices appear headed up so gas prices will soon follow. Not too long ago I was paying closer to $4.00/gallon and $4.00/gallon gasoline is probably closer than one might believe. Sigh.


(I refuse to use the black key with the Hellcat.)


It is unfortunate the RE was wrecked. I watched the video a while back when someone first posted it but I don't know what exactly happened. (I suspect the driver developed a bad case of driving with his head up his ass.) Really a number of lesser cars are wrecked in many cases by people doing things in/with a car they had no business doing.

I think the RE (or the Hellcat) and similar cars just act to magnify what kind of driver one is. If one is stupid in a lesser car he's very much likely to behave the same way in a RE/HC. The difference is the more powerful cars magnify the consequences of being stupid.

The fact the HC came with 707hp and 650 ft lbs of torque didn't scare me. Just the opposite. It was part of the attraction. I have enough confidence in myself to know I'm not going to do something stupid in the HC. (My mantra when I first get in my HC (or my JCW for that matter) is "Don't be stupid.")

Thus my concern is not with my driving, but with the driving of every other driver. My time on the road is pretty much spent avoiding all the other drivers of other vehicles when they do something stupid.
 

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I think its kind of simple the higher the MSRP on just about any car the more you will lose in the years to come. The difference between the scat pack widebody and the hellcat redeye more hp and $30,000.Wait till you go to trade it in KBB price.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Rockster,

My neighbor with the Hellcat he traded his Scat Pack in for has also said he sometimes misses the Scat Pack.

I saw a couple of years ago that about 4 years ago US vehicle fatalities spiked and have stayed higher than they were 4 years ago. It's tough identifying the possible variables, then teasing out which might be responsible for the reversal in safety, but my pet theory is distracted driving because of cellular phones. I've seen people trying to text with both hands on top of the wheel of the 3/4 ton pickups - going 10 mph slower than the speed limit and forcing drivers to go around them.

Like manning up an airplane, or a tractor, climbing behind the wheel of these high performance cars should be an exercise in concentration, especially the Hellcats. I fly for a living and I bought a compact utility tractor with Front End Loader which I use on hills to mow and move dirt and gravel with. My tractor has my full attention EVERY time I climb up and work it. It will be that way with my Challenger too. I think I'd drive it sensibly like you feel you do.

Here's a thought. If the Red Eye likely won't hold equivalent dollar amount loss to the Scat Pack, as I wishfully postulated, then would there be some compromise between economic sense and driving fun in deciding on the 2019's 717 HP Hellcat Wide Body? Still a considerable chunk of change more than the Scat Pack, but perhaps a middle ground purchase? Lol! Hard to give up thoughts of a Hellcat! I think I want the full leather seats, which aren't available in the Scat Pack.

The odds are that with wanting my wife to drive and enjoy the car too I'll get a 2019 Scat Pack Wide Body. The tuned suspension and overall balance between handling and power, from all accounts and reviews, predicts a happier ownership experience for us. Plus it has the fun stuff - the line lock and launch control. And, she wants a new back deck!

Thanks for the additional information.

Best,

Finface
 

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Discussion Starter #15
hardrock,

Distilling decisions down to a couple of sentences has been a lifelong challenge for me. My wife is with you and cuts to the chase.

Thanks for the reply!

Best,

Finface
 

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If your not going to drive it to it's potential then get the six banger.

It's still 305 hp and way less money and better milage and who gives a shit if it gets banged up!

At some point you have to say, what would I enjoy?
 

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If your not going to drive it to it's potential then get the six banger.

It's still 305 hp and way less money and better milage and who gives a shit if it gets banged up!

At some point you have to say, what would I enjoy?
I guess what causes me to make a statement like that is that I watched my Dad who could undoubtedly afford whatever vehicle He wanted agonize for years over nickels and dimes at the end of his life over a vehicle which He deserved and earned through his hard work and diligence and finally bought and then died and didn't get to enjoy.

The SX's and GT's are ass kicking beautiful cars and I absolutely meant no disrespect to anyone that owns one. I would have killed for that level of performance in my younger years.

But, now that I do have a little expendable income (thanks Dad for kicking my ass,instilling a sense of fiscal responsibility, and also leaving me a little doh ray mi)I feel that it's time to enjoy life's labor.

I have always owned ocean fishing boats that are a HUGE money pit but the family time accrued was worth every cent.

The kids have gone their own ways and we vacation differently now so this car is going to be MY decadent pleasure.

Cost is well worth it.Life is short.

P.S. my boats for sale and it has an ocean troll permit!
 

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There are hundreds of very lightly used 2015-2018 Hellcats around with steep discounts. I've always bought new cars, but wouldn't be afraid to buy the right used Hellcat. I actually bought my first Hellcat new for well under invoice by going out of state. I traded it about 18 months later for a used Hellcat with very low mileage (under 5k) because I regretted not getting a manual originally. I actually feel like the used car is the better vehicle. Absolutely no supercharger noise and it just feels "tighter". I owned a Scat Pack as well. There is nothing wrong with them but the Hellcat is what you want. It's a crazy time where you can buy a 700 horsepower car for under 50k. There are also a lot of leftover widebody Hellcats that would be much cheaper than a Redeye. If you want that much power you could always tune it and do a pulley swap but the regular Hellcat in stock form is a handful for most.
 

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There are hundreds of very lightly used 2015-2018 Hellcats around with steep discounts. I've always bought new cars, but wouldn't be afraid to buy the right used Hellcat. I actually bought my first Hellcat new for well under invoice by going out of state. I traded it about 18 months later for a used Hellcat with very low mileage (under 5k) because I regretted not getting a manual originally. I actually feel like the used car is the better vehicle. Absolutely no supercharger noise and it just feels "tighter". I owned a Scat Pack as well. There is nothing wrong with them but the Hellcat is what you want. It's a crazy time where you can buy a 700 horsepower car for under 50k. There are also a lot of leftover widebody Hellcats that would be much cheaper than a Redeye. If you want that much power you could always tune it and do a pulley swap but the regular Hellcat in stock form is a handful for most.
I agree, I had a 2010 Challenger SRT, 425 HP, traded it on a 2015 SRT, 485 HP. I now have traded up to a Hellcat, it was used with 1400 miles and in perfect condition. All 3 of my Challengers were great, lots of power. However the Hellcat is a beast! You can feel that extra 200 HP for sure and the attention it gets is fun. The Hellcat is by far more fun, more exciting to drive and I am glad I have her.
 
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