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I really like the challenger, but it’s rwd, and I live in Michigan. I was wondering if daily driving this kind of car is even possible in the winter, and what type of winter tires I would need. My brother thinks that it would be impossible to drive a rear wheel drive car in the winter, even with winter tires on, but I wanted to check with you guys first. Thanks in advance!
 

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Definitely not "impossible" - but also definitely not "optimal". :) With winter tires, it can be done. But a high-horsepower V8, along with RWD definitely isn't the best choice for winter driving.

If you don't need the V8, you can always get an AWD Challenger. I have a 2018 GT (which is AWD) and I love it - but you can only get AWD with a V6. The V6, however, is still 305hp - and being that it's mated to an 8-speed automatic, it still gets out of it's own way pretty good for such a large, heavy car.

Just FYI - wasn't sure if you were aware of the AWD Challenger....
 

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Definitely not "impossible" - but also definitely not "optimal". :) With winter tires, it can be done. But a high-horsepower V8, along with RWD definitely isn't the best choice for winter driving.

If you don't need the V8, you can always get an AWD Challenger. I have a 2018 GT (which is AWD) and I love it - but you can only get AWD with a V6. The V6, however, is still 305hp - and being that it's mated to an 8-speed automatic, it still gets out of it's own way pretty good for such a large, heavy car.

Just FYI - wasn't sure if you were aware of the AWD Challenger....
I would like to have a manual though, I don’t know why I just like manuals more
 

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I drove my 2016 R/T Shaker 6M for 2 Winters with Blizzaks on all fours and it did surprisingly well. I didn't push it to the limits but I never once got stuck. The only issue I had was ground clearance. I live in the Hudson Valley in NY and our Winters can be quite severe. I now have an AWD G/T but I would go back to the R/T if needed, Just my .02 cents.
 

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I really like the challenger, but it’s rwd, and I live in Michigan. I was wondering if daily driving this kind of car is even possible in the winter, and what type of winter tires I would need. My brother thinks that it would be impossible to drive a rear wheel drive car in the winter, even with winter tires on, but I wanted to check with you guys first. Thanks in advance!
Have not spent any real time in Michigan but I grew up in the midwest and this when all cars/pick up trucks were RWD.

Jeeps were military surplus and used mostly by farmers. Trucks were farm vehicles too. 4WD trucks were rare.

The most exotic car I can recall was the appearance of the rear engine VW Beetle.

Back then life didn't shut down when the snow came. Snow tires -- and not the advanced ones available today -- were fitted and chains carried for just in case. In some cases some bags of sand were added to the trunk to help give the rear tires more bite.

Get the Challenger if you want. When the time comes get a set of winter wheels/tires, real snow tires not those all season junk, put some bags of sand in the trunk and drive on.

You can get a large plastic tub from say Walmart which will fit in the trunk and hold the bags. This in case you get stuck and need to open a bad to use the sand. The bags in the tub mean the sand doesn't leak out and get all over the trunk and in the carpet.

Do not know the weight distribution of the car you are considering but shoot for enough weight in the trunk to try to get this to 50:50. But don't overload the car and keep in mind ballast in the trunk means you can't carry a full cabin of passengers and their luggage.

If there are chains (or cables) available for use with the car and tires get a good set and carry in the car in case.

AWD ain't the solution. It is not the going that can be the real problem it is the turning and stopping and in this case AWD doesn't help. The key is tires. Tires. Did I mention tires? Well, tires. And I savvy driver who knows and practices safe winter driving.

What might keep your car home in the garage is a heavy snow storm that has the roads deep with snow to the point the car's ground clearance could be too low. But I suspect where you are the road crews are pretty quick to get the roads cleared. The real problem is where snow is not that common. A heavy snow storm in such an area not used to it and not set up to deal with it just brings everything to a slip sliding crunching halt. A good number of people can't drive in good weather. In rain they are helpless. In snow they are dangerous.
 

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^^^^^^^^^^Yes, what Rockster wrote.^^^^^^^^^^ I grew up and have lived in northern and central Illinois most of my 74 years. If you want the RWD, go for it. That's assuming you know how to drive in snow. I have NEVER been stuck in snow where I needed to be pulled/pushed out. In 1961 when I started driving, roads were not cleared of snow nearly as well as they are now. All we had were RWD cars.
 

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I drove my V6 Camaro’s in the snow in Colorado (its better weather here) with blizzaks in every condition and in blizzards and it did better than most cars do. I went to work one day in 2’ of snow, zero issues while everyone else got stuck it was sliding off the road.
 

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I drove a Mustang GT in the Minnesota winters. Like others have said, I grew up driving rear drive all year, so it was not a big deal to me. But after seeing how good my wifes AWD Charger is in the winter (much better than my F150), I bought a 2018 GT. No winter with it yet, but I am sure I am going to love it.
 

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My brother thinks that it would be impossible to drive a rear wheel drive car in the winter, even with winter tires on, but I wanted to check with you guys first. Thanks in advance!
What does your brother think happened when all the cars were RWD? Did everyone just stay home for the winter? With todays tire technology and traction control it's certainly easier now than it was in the 70's.

With that said it also depends on where you live. At my last house it would have been no problem but I moved more rural and there are some steep hills that you can't get a run at so I bought an AWD Challenger and use that as a daily which it does amazingly well.
 

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Here in Canada, I don't plan on driving my srt8 in the winter, however, I do drive a pickup, and most of the time I leave it in 2wd, it is also a manual, and with good snow tires, I have never needed to use 4wd. So not the exact same situation, but a good weight distribution RWD v8 will be no problem in winter, if you drive with your brain and not your foot. (y)
 

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SO many comments possible, geez, run what ya brung. If it is slipping and you don't want it to, don't hit the gas as hard.
If you can't make the turn, next time you'll learn to drive slower. Did you brother have any parents or grand parents? Odd are they all drove and rode in RWD cars, on worse roads, with less snow removal, up hill both ways into the wind.
 

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Of course we drove RWD cars "back in the day" (myself included) and made due with what we had. But there is no denying that AWD and even FWD cars are better in the snow - which is why the vast majority of vehicles are FWD nowadays - and a lot of cars are also available in AWD now. Yes, you can drive in the winter with a RWD car, but apples-to-apples, with the same tires, a FWD or AWD drive car is better in the snow, hands down. If you need to be able to get somewhere year-round and you live where you get snow, you're better off with FWD or AWD.
 

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Of course we drove RWD cars "back in the day" (myself included) and made due with what we had. But there is no denying that AWD and even FWD cars are better in the snow - which is why the vast majority of vehicles are FWD nowadays - and a lot of cars are also available in AWD now. Yes, you can drive in the winter with a RWD car, but apples-to-apples, with the same tires, a FWD or AWD drive car is better in the snow, hands down. If you need to be able to get somewhere year-round and you live where you get snow, you're better off with FWD or AWD.
I fully agree with AWD/4WD, but not FWD. The entire reason for FWD is packaging/cost. It is more compact, can be lighter, more economical to produce and install. (OK, maybe not the entire reason) And just about everything has some sort of traction control now which helps a bit. I have driven just about everything in the snow, huge 1975 Impala, small RWD Sunbirds, Full size vans, FWD just about every size, 4WD Jeeps, and the thing that makes the difference is experience and actual real new snow tires.
Personally, I think SUVs should be banned on snow days. All they do is block the roads. The people that buy them are more likely to be the people afraid to drive in the snow, so they buy AWD SUV because they are told they are better. BUT, they are still afraid, but go out anyway. And drive like scared idiots blocking the roads thinking the car will do it for them. The last accident I was in (minor) was on a icy day in my Charger with regular tires. I was driving carefully, came to a stop at a red light, took my time and braked very early. Then got rear ended by a Ford Escape sliding into me with nobody else on the road. And the lady complained how she hates driving in the snow...
 

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We'll have to agree to disagree about FWD being better than RWD in the snow. IMO, it's really pretty simple though - the weight of the engine and trans are over the drive wheels, the drive wheels are also the steering wheels and a FWD car has the drive wheels "pulling" the car via the steering wheels, whereas a RWD car just "pushes" the car and doesn't aid in steering in any way - FWD wins in terms of traction benefits - easily.

Probably not the best description, but you get the point...

Experience is helpful regardless of FWD, RWD or AWD. But FWD and AWD have "built in" benefits for snow traction. In my experience, you can usually get around in a FWD or AWD car even without snow tires, whereas they are absolutely required for RWD in the snow - and even then, still not as good as FWD or AWD. Adding winter tires to FWD or RWD really "seals the deal" for FWD/AWD.
 

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Of course we drove RWD cars "back in the day" (myself included) and made due with what we had. But there is no denying that AWD and even FWD cars are better in the snow - which is why the vast majority of vehicles are FWD nowadays - and a lot of cars are also available in AWD now. Yes, you can drive in the winter with a RWD car, but apples-to-apples, with the same tires, a FWD or AWD drive car is better in the snow, hands down. If you need to be able to get somewhere year-round and you live where you get snow, you're better off with FWD or AWD.
FWD works pretty good in the snow because generally FWD means lots of weight over the driving wheels.

My FWD VW Golf TDi was very good in the snow -- helped by some excellent Michelin tires -- but the fact nearly 60% of the car's weight was over the front wheels helped too.

On the flip side my Boxster (mid engine layout) had nearly the reverse weight distribution with around 60% of the car's weight over the rear tires. The Turbo had even more weight on the rear wheels (rear engine layout). (For these cars I put the ballast in the front trunk to help give the front tires more bite.) These cars would have been equally good in the snow had I bothered to fit snow tires to them. But the times I found myself in snow in either car I managed, although a few times it was accompanied with white knuckles from gripping the wheel and serious seat pucker.

But a RWD car as I touched upon in a previous post can work very well. Tires and ballast go a long way. But the driver must still be mindful of the conditions and always drive accordingly.

IF a vehicle suits one and if it comes with AWD that's cool. ('course, it depends upon the AWD system. My Turbo came with AWD but it was not of any real value given the limited amount of torque transmitted to the front axle and via a viscous coupling.) If one believes AWD is a necessity well that's his decision. One has to be careful not to get a false sense of "invincibility" in the snow with AWD. Motoring past other vehicles is real satisfying but when it comes to stopping or turning the AWD is no better than RWD/FWD vehicles. Come winter and the videos of winter driving appear one sees AWD vehicles sliding down the same hills as FWD/RWD vehicles.
 

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I drove my 18 RT through the winter last year on the stock tires and it was not greatly fun. Luckily the winter was not horrible until later on. When that ice hit in Michigan, this big heavy beast loved to sit and burn'em. Like everyone says just don't hit the gas hard. Well that's fine and dandy until you need to get moving out of the way of something. Get good winter tires and hope you have plenty of room to take off and stop. Your best bet is to get the AWD or buy a beater for winter. I definitely do not plan on driving this car through winter again.
The last Michigan winter it was warm then cold then warm then cold, damn car was froze in the driveway. Salted the driveway still couldn't get the car out. Figured I would have to leave it until Spring. No great place to hook onto these cars. I took the floor mats out of my old Dodge Ram and stuffed them under the rear tires to get the dang thing out. I also remember pushing snow with the front bumper which was kinda fun, was hoping the fog lights didn't burn out as they look expensive. The worst part about the winter was the auto windows freezing up and the doors not opening and closing....
 

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I drove my 18 RT through the winter last year on the stock tires and it was not greatly fun. Luckily the winter was not horrible until later on. When that ice hit in Michigan, this big heavy beast loved to sit and burn'em. Like everyone says just don't hit the gas hard. Well that's fine and dandy until you need to get moving out of the way of something. Get good winter tires and hope you have plenty of room to take off and stop. Your best bet is to get the AWD or buy a beater for winter. I definitely do not plan on driving this car through winter again.
The last Michigan winter it was warm then cold then warm then cold, damn car was froze in the driveway. Salted the driveway still couldn't get the car out. Figured I would have to leave it until Spring. No great place to hook onto these cars. I took the floor mats out of my old Dodge Ram and stuffed them under the rear tires to get the dang thing out. I also remember pushing snow with the front bumper which was kinda fun, was hoping the fog lights didn't burn out as they look expensive. The worst part about the winter was the auto windows freezing up and the doors not opening and closing....
And this is why my baby is a garage queen.
 

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Unless I hit the lottery or something I will always daily drive my nicest car. Even then I probably still would, it would just be an even nicer one. I don't understand having a super nice car sitting at home while you drive some compromise to save the other one. Sure, a couple days here or there, I get it, but putting it away for months on end, I don't. If it is horrible out some day I'll stay home or carpool with my wife.
 
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