Dodge Challenger Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all
This may sound crazy... but I bought a brand new set of winter tires, and will be installing soon, as the snow is right around the corner here in NH. Today someone mentioned at work that I need to break them in before the snow is here. In other words put them on now, so they are ready for wintery roads. This may sound crazy to some, as it does to me as well. I wanted to know if anyone had ever heard of this .
Much appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Never heard of breaking them in but if it's below 40 regularly, you should already have switched to the winter tires for better traction. Especially if you're on summer tires. I guess that could count as your break-in if you're looking for peace of mind. Remember, they are winter tires, not snow tires.

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Never heard of breaking them in but if it's below 40 regularly, you should already have switched to the winter tires for better traction. Especially if you're on summer tires. I guess that could count as your break-in if you're looking for peace of mind. Remember, they are winter tires, not snow tires.

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
Makes sense .. thank you for the heads up on that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I missed the part about only buying a pair. I would definitely buy a full set. Your handling will be very unpredictable without it anytime you decide to push the car.

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
Joined
·
4,425 Posts
Hi all
This may sound crazy... but I bought a brand new set of winter tires, and will be installing soon, as the snow is right around the corner here in NH. Today someone mentioned at work that I need to break them in before the snow is here. In other words put them on now, so they are ready for wintery roads. This may sound crazy to some, as it does to me as well. I wanted to know if anyone had ever heard of this .
Much appreciated
Tire "break in" is really just to give the tire time to lose the mold release agent. This can make the tire a bit slippery. This is often brought up on line -- and without looking to confirm this I believe it is mentioned in the owners manual -- but I dare hazard a guess most car owners have never heard of "mold release" and the need to break in tires.

My tire purchases have all been summer/high performance tires. I give them a couple of hundred miles of regular use to give them time to do whatever it is they will do in that time. I have never done this but if I was going "straight" the track with new tires I'd use the first track session to give the tires some time running hot to give up any mold release and to ensure the brakes were bedded in.

For winter tires while there is probably some mold release compound the rubber by itself does not provide the bulk of the grip snow tires are noted for when on snow it is the tread topology -- numerous narrow tread grooves -- and with some snow tires tiny fibers in the tread rubber that drip the snow. These features contribute their portion to the over all grip of the tire regardless of any mold release.

The flip side is on clear pavement the rubber of the tread does provide the grip so in this case an argument for "breaking in" snow tires could be made.

Common sense driving I think would have you a bit cautious and conservative with new snow tires on the car as you learn how the tires work or don't work and as you become comfortable with the car on the tires and the car with the snow tires on snow. You thus would not after getting new snow tires on the car head out and drive like Colin McRae from the outset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tire "break in" is really just to give the tire time to lose the mold release agent. This can make the tire a bit slippery. This is often brought up on line -- and without looking to confirm this I believe it is mentioned in the owners manual -- but I dare hazard a guess most car owners have never heard of "mold release" and the need to break in tires.

My tire purchases have all been summer/high performance tires. I give them a couple of hundred miles of regular use to give them time to do whatever it is they will do in that time. I have never done this but if I was going "straight" the track with new tires I'd use the first track session to give the tires some time running hot to give up any mold release and to ensure the brakes were bedded in.

For winter tires while there is probably some mold release compound the rubber by itself does not provide the bulk of the grip snow tires are noted for when on snow it is the tread topology -- numerous narrow tread grooves -- and with some snow tires tiny fibers in the tread rubber that drip the snow. These features contribute their portion to the over all grip of the tire regardless of any mold release.

The flip side is on clear pavement the rubber of the tread does provide the grip so in this case an argument for "breaking in" snow tires could be made.

Common sense driving I think would have you a bit cautious and conservative with new snow tires on the car as you learn how the tires work or don't work and as you become comfortable with the car on the tires and the car with the snow tires on snow. You thus would not after getting new snow tires on the car head out and drive like Colin McRae from the outset.
Thank you for this post! Informative!!!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top