Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just change the pulley on my 2.9L whipple that is on my 2015 Challenger R/T. I went from 3.50 to a 3.375. I went from 8 psi to 9psi for altitude. I’m trying get some power back that I lose in Denver. I don’t get the same Numbers here as I would at sea level. Here are my before and after numbers. 1 sheet is my altitude (UnCorrected) and the other for sea level (Corrected) numbers.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,286 Posts
I just change the pulley on my 2.9L whipple that is on my 2015 Challenger R/T. I went from 3.50 to a 3.375. I went from 8 psi to 9psi for altitude. I’m trying get some power back that I lose in Denver. I don’t get the same Numbers here as I would at sea level. Here are my before and after numbers. 1 sheet is my altitude (UnCorrected) and the other for sea level (Corrected) numbers.
Don't think you can completely eliminate the effects of altitude with more boost. More boost -- in some cases -- helps but is not a cure all.

You have got to be careful. Denver gasoline might be only 90 octane. (Flagstaff is just 90 as is I think Albuquerque and Amarillo.) But I haven't been through Denver for nearly 9 years and I don't recall now what the highest octane available is there. If just 90 octane and if you bump boost the engine controller might have to dial back timing.

OTOH, I remember with my Porsche 996 Turbo (with 2 turbo-chargers) with 93 gasoline in the tank in Wyoming at over 8K feet the car was a beast. Boost, nominally 0.7 bar, hit 0.9 bar -- and stayed there for a "while" so the 0.9 bar was not a "glitch"-- and the car accelerated like a scalded cat. (The Turbo engine's controller allowed more boost than "normal" to satisfy the torque demand and with 93 octane gasoline in the tank the engine controller didn't have to dial back boost or timing.)
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top