Dodge Challenger Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of September's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

Registered
Joined
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I have recently posted about my 2017 used dodge challenger SXT. I bought the car used some months back, while running 87 octane I noticed once in a while a rotten egg smell. Now this is a follow up post!!! I would smell it approximately two times a week while driving to work and back, 30 miles to work 30 miles back five days a week. Now I know all about how it could be the Catalytic converter, we have discussed this on mini posts. So anyways I have tried switching different brands and some took the smell almost away but never fully. Recently about two weeks ago I switched from 87 octane to 89 octane ..
I have never smelled the smell again!!!!!
After running numerous tanks of gas, no smell. I guess my question is why is my car doing better on the 89 octane when it calls for 87 octane.
Another question is does that totally put my Catalytic converter out of the question, as for possibly being bad. If I鈥檓 not smelling it anymore with the 89 octane .
This must mean it鈥檚 not my Catalytic converter??? Please any thoughts are greatly appreciated and thank you!
 

Registered
Joined
1,508 Posts
The 89 is more than likely being burned more completely. I would think your cars are fine if you aren鈥檛 smelling the smell anymore.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: Perseverance7

Registered
2011 SXT Built in the Canada Plant
Joined
2,310 Posts
I run 89 Octane - Non Ethanol I get at WaWa in my 2011 SXT Smooth, More Responsive, and gave a small but appreciated boost in my MPG.
I'm getting 30mpg my last 2 Fill Ups since Dec 23rd and a new Air Filter. When I ran 87 reg it was ok then I went to 89 and now the 89 Non Ethanol
cant be happier...
 

Registered
Joined
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I run 89 Octane - Non Ethanol I get at WaWa in my 2011 SXT Smooth, More Responsive, and gave a small but appreciated boost in my MPG.
I'm getting 30mpg my last 2 Fill Ups since Dec 23rd and a new Air Filter. When I ran 87 reg it was ok then I went to 89 and now the 89 Non Ethanol
cant be happier...
馃憤 and noted !!
 

Registered
Joined
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The 89 is more than likely being burned more completely. I would think your cars are fine if you aren鈥檛 smelling the smell anymore.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I was told by many people that occasionally smelling that smell was normal, and some would say you shouldn鈥檛 smell it anytime and it鈥檚 my converter. I tend to believe it had something to do with the gas, as no lights were on on my dash. Your answer helps me believe it was simply the fuel. Thank you for your response!!
 

Super Moderator
Joined
17,238 Posts
I remember one of my (then new) cars in the mid 80s would really stink if I used Shell brand gas - seems theirs had a greater Sulfur content.

It would smell like a match had been struck or a very strong sulfur oder. Other brands, it didn't happen - and this was known to turn up

and as others have noted, while the 3.6 is "rated" for 87 octane, many noted 89 octane seems to allow a bit more timing advance which helps MPG especially steady state cruise. (probably helps mitigate spark knock / timing retard - if 87 isn't quite sufficient for operating conditions)
 

Registered
Joined
538 Posts
Non Ethanol has fewer ingredients, I can't remember exactly, but is was like 5 in non ethanol, and 2 to 3 times that with the ethanol gasoline. And then there are summer vs winter blends. What suprised me that in ethanol winter blend, there is a significant amount of butane, which is lighter fluid. Higher quality gas uses hydrocarbons with longer chains, which is another way to say a longer chemical formula. Butane is C4H10. Hydrocarbon chains starting with C5, C6, and C7 are solvents. Hydrocarbon chains C7H16 through C11H24 are considered gasoline

 

Premium Member
Joined
10,366 Posts
I鈥檇 make it smell and make them replace it under warranty, if it fails later on you鈥檙e then on the hook for it.
 

Registered
Joined
331 Posts
I am/have been a closed window driver for decades, and find I have to 'blow out' the interior of this car more than any I've had before. It seems to pick up other car's smells, etc. so easily it has changed how how I drive or follow others.


TO CLARIFY - I am saying I get an unprecedented number of smells from other vehicles or the general environment. I have thus learned to avoid the bro trucks, smokers (gas or diesel), and 'hot rods' not really burning their gas (?). If I do not I will be slowing (to let them get away), changing lanes to slow (for safety), and opening both sides (and wearing my tint!) to blow out cabin air. This car seems to exchange cabin air to outside air more/better? than any I've ever owned - but a bit of a curse for the now non-smoking me!
 

Registered
Joined
1,508 Posts
You may want to change the cabin air filter.
 

Registered
2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
Joined
4,203 Posts
Believe you have never reported a CEL? If the converters were bad you'd see a CEL and with it one or more error codes pointing to the converters.

Might have posted this before but my info is a converter can get started on the wrong foot, chemically speaking, and the rotten egg smell -- hydrogen sulfide -- is the result.

The recommended "solution" is to try another brand of gasoline. The odor arises in part from the sulfur content in the gasoline. It should be low but there can be some variation.

Some more info:
-------------------

Sulfur Levels in Gasoline
The LDV Emissions program required gasoline to meet an average sulfur standard of 120 ppm and a cap of 300 ppm beginning in 2004. Since 2006, the average standard was reduced to 30 ppm with an 80 ppm sulfur cap. Starting January 1, 2017, EPA requires that federal gasoline will contain an average of 10 ppm sulfur on an annual basis, with the maximum sulfur allowed per batch remaining at 80 ppm at the refinery gate and 95 ppm downstream. EPA has offered flexibility in phase in of these sulfur standards at each stage, temporarily allowing for compliance with less stringent standards by small refiners or small volume refiners in 2004-2006, 2006-2007, and again during 2017-2020.
-------------------

And:
-------------------
The Tier 3 light-duty vehicle emissions rule requires a reduction in sulfur content in gasoline, from the current 30-ppm average to 10-ppm average, effective January 1, 2017.

The sulfur limits at the refinery gate and downstream are unchanged from Tier 2, with maximum of:
  • 80 ppm for the refinery gate
  • 95 ppm for downstream
-------------------

If you want here's the link to above info:


You were probably buying gasoline with a sulfur level at the upper end of the allowable amount, whatever that is. The info above is a bit confusing: 10 ppm average, but 80 ppm for the refinery gate and 95 ppm for downstream. Confusing.

But in switching gasoline what you are currently using has a lower sulfur content.

Some refineries process crude oil with a pretty high sulfur content. Actually crude oil with a relatively high sulfur content is pretty common. Oil producing regions which produce crude with high sulfur content (>1%) include Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan), US (California), Mexico, South America (Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Middle East (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia).

Due to sanctions Venezuela crude is no longer used by US refineries. Velero relied upon Venezuela crude until a year or two back but when it could no longer use this source of oil because of the sanctions it switched. It has "stuck" with mainly heavy crude and crude oil with a high sulfur content. My info is its refineries are specifically designed to process this type of crude.
 

Registered
Joined
1,873 Posts
Also - keep in mind that the manuals usually state the minimum accepted octane level - not necessarily the optimal or "best" octane level. Not sure how Dodge words it, but I'm pretty sure my Impala owners manual specifically mentioned a minimum of 87 octane - not that 87 was the optimal fuel.

Personally, I always use "top-tier" premium in all of my cars (premium is usually 93 octane where I am). Some will say that it's a waste of money, but I prefer it. :)
 

Registered
2011 SXT Built in the Canada Plant
Joined
2,310 Posts
Well I can justify the increased cost of the 89 Non Ethanol for my car for the small gains they add up in long run. Most of my Driving in on HWY and Interstate but even around town the smoother idle and response. I tried the 90 - 91 but was Ethanol and that's why I went to the 89 NE and so far that was best.
 

Banned
Joined
295 Posts
I run 89 Octane - Non Ethanol I get at WaWa in my 2011 SXT Smooth, More Responsive, and gave a small but appreciated boost in my MPG.
I'm getting 30mpg my last 2 Fill Ups since Dec 23rd and a new Air Filter. When I ran 87 reg it was ok then I went to 89 and now the 89 Non Ethanol
cant be happier...
I experienced the same in my 345 R/T. Loves non-ethanol 89 octane!
 

Registered
Joined
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am/have been a closed window driver for decades, and find I have to 'blow out' the interior of this car more than any I've had before. It seems to pick up other car's smells, etc. so easily it has changed how how I drive or follow others.
Are you smelling sulfur ?
just curious ??

You may want to change the cabin air filter.
I will look into this
Thank you!
Believe you have never reported a CEL? If the converters were bad you'd see a CEL and with it one or more error codes pointing to the converters.

Might have posted this before but my info is a converter can get started on the wrong foot, chemically speaking, and the rotten egg smell -- hydrogen sulfide -- is the result.

The recommended "solution" is to try another brand of gasoline. The odor arises in part from the sulfur content in the gasoline. It should be low but there can be some variation.

Some more info:
-------------------

Sulfur Levels in Gasoline
The LDV Emissions program required gasoline to meet an average sulfur standard of 120 ppm and a cap of 300 ppm beginning in 2004. Since 2006, the average standard was reduced to 30 ppm with an 80 ppm sulfur cap. Starting January 1, 2017, EPA requires that federal gasoline will contain an average of 10 ppm sulfur on an annual basis, with the maximum sulfur allowed per batch remaining at 80 ppm at the refinery gate and 95 ppm downstream. EPA has offered flexibility in phase in of these sulfur standards at each stage, temporarily allowing for compliance with less stringent standards by small refiners or small volume refiners in 2004-2006, 2006-2007, and again during 2017-2020.
-------------------

And:
-------------------
The Tier 3 light-duty vehicle emissions rule requires a reduction in sulfur content in gasoline, from the current 30-ppm average to 10-ppm average, effective January 1, 2017.

The sulfur limits at the refinery gate and downstream are unchanged from Tier 2, with maximum of:
  • 80 ppm for the refinery gate
  • 95 ppm for downstream
-------------------

If you want here's the link to above info:


You were probably buying gasoline with a sulfur level at the upper end of the allowable amount, whatever that is. The info above is a bit confusing: 10 ppm average, but 80 ppm for the refinery gate and 95 ppm for downstream. Confusing.

But in switching gasoline what you are currently using has a lower sulfur content.

Some refineries process crude oil with a pretty high sulfur content. Actually crude oil with a relatively high sulfur content is pretty common. Oil producing regions which produce crude with high sulfur content (>1%) include Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan), US (California), Mexico, South America (Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Middle East (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia).

Due to sanctions Venezuela crude is no longer used by US refineries. Velero relied upon Venezuela crude until a year or two back but when it could no longer use this source of oil because of the sanctions it switched. It has "stuck" with mainly heavy crude and crude oil with a high sulfur content. My info is its refineries are specifically designed to process this type of crude.
Very informative!!
I actually did read your post on my other post about same matter , just different situation. Let me ask you this question. I did change gas companies and noticed less smell.. but never totally gone . Why do you think the 89 put a end to this smell? Is it possible the 89 contains less sulfur? Is it possible the detergents helped? Thank you for your response!

Well I can justify the increased cost of the 89 Non Ethanol for my car for the small gains they add up in long run. Most of my Driving in on HWY and Interstate but even around town the smoother idle and response. I tried the 90 - 91 but was Ethanol and that's why I went to the 89 NE and so far that was best.
I appreciate your response!
I definitely do notice a small performance gain, actually a fair performance gain .. Not complaining .. has a little more pep in it .
As far as MPG I will time it to find out . Thank you . Also where do you find your 89 non ethanol? The 89 where I go does contain ethanol.

I guess my next question would be ..
Where can I find the 89 non ethanol .
the shell I go to all the gas 87 89 91 contain Ethanol . Please correct me if I am wrong . But do certain gas stations only contain non ethanol?? Or does the 89 from shell not have ethanol in it ?
thank you for all responses !
Very helpful.
 

Super Moderator
2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
Joined
26,711 Posts

Registered
2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
Joined
4,203 Posts
Are you smelling sulfur ?
just curious ??


I will look into this
Thank you!

Very informative!!
I actually did read your post on my other post about same matter , just different situation. Let me ask you this question. I did change gas companies and noticed less smell.. but never totally gone . Why do you think the 89 put a end to this smell? Is it possible the 89 contains less sulfur? Is it possible the detergents helped? Thank you for your response!


I appreciate your response!
I definitely do notice a small performance gain, actually a fair performance gain .. Not complaining .. has a little more pep in it .
As far as MPG I will time it to find out . Thank you . Also where do you find your 89 non ethanol? The 89 where I go does contain ethanol.

I guess my next question would be ..
Where can I find the 89 non ethanol .
the shell I go to all the gas 87 89 91 contain Ethanol . Please correct me if I am wrong . But do certain gas stations only contain non ethanol?? Or does the 89 from shell not have ethanol in it ?
thank you for all responses !
Very helpful.
My WAG is changing to a different gasoline eliminated the odor because the gasoline had lower sulfur content. From my limited research there is some allowed differences in the amount of sulfur gasoline can contain. There was a mention that smaller refineries got some exemption for some time to allow them to produce gas with more sulfur.

So the different gasoline has less sulfur but also a different (enough) chemical make up (including "detergents") that in the case of your car and its converters appears to be less likely to result in the converters getting off on the wrong foot.

Gasoline tests have found differences between "regular" and "premium" blends compared to the blends offered by other companies. In these tests mainly the focus was on how the engine ran on a dyno and on the track. That some produced more power -- albeit not that much more but still... -- suggests there is some difference in the chemical make up of the gasoline. That this could have the car/engine/converters more likely to stink or less likely to stink could certainly be a factor.

Gasoline tests also noted stale gasoline was an issue. Some high scoring gasoline when bought at another station fared less well. This was attributed to staleness. The take away was to buy gasoline from a busy station.

Additionally there was some variability arising from just the normal allowable deviation permitted. Some stations, discount stations, depend upon low prices. While the stations get the low price the quality of the gasoline varies and varies enough -- while still staying within the allowable variation -- to sometimes be rather "exceptional" at other times less so.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top