Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After having no luck with the $50 metal & plastic “oil change” type ramps and not having enough money to buy anything in the Race Ramps brand of ramps, I set out to make something from scratch that I could afford and would work for my Challenger (1-2” lower than stock ride height).

What I eventually ended up with was a suitable set of ramps whose parts were relatively inexpensive and whose construction even I could handle (I am NO carpenter!).

Ingredients (and where purchased):
- two 2”x10”x10’ boards* (Lowes)
- a box(50?) of 3” wood screws (Lowes)
- 2 square feet of black rubber “diamond plate” grip (Harbor Freight)
- some jumbo plastic zip ties (Wal-Mart) - optional
- a set of plastic wheel chocks (Wal-Mart) - optional, but highly recommended!
*Each board cut into 3 pieces to make one ramp - 48", 36", and 24".

I won’t go into all the details of construction, as that might be a little confusing to try to explain textually. But I have attached some pics of the ramps in use. So if anyone wants to make their own set, I think these pics will pretty much show you what you need to do with the stuff listed above.

NOTE #1: That slender plank you see between the two ramps is a spare piece of wood I had laying around and decided to use at the last minute. It is cut to be 55" long and has metal L brackets on each end so I can hook between the ramps and keep the correct spacing while trying to get them lined up. Once car is in place on ramps, it is removed and set aside, as it is no longer needed.
It is not absolutely necessary, but it does make things a little easier when trying to drive up on ramps without a helper to position/reposition them on approach.

NOTE #2: You probably noticed the lengths of the 3 boards after cutting don't add up to the length of the original board before cutting - there's 12" missing. That is due to me rounding off my measurements and also due to some wood being lost on each board during trial and error of getting angled ends cut just right.
If you go to make a set of your own, copying my exact measurments isn't as important as keeping your board lengths proportional among the levels and consistent between sides.


Nuke, OUT!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
gets the job done without killing the budget - I like it.
Now, if you are in the +200 group like myself, you might have to go with a 4th layer :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nuke

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Good job! Looks very solid.
Yeah, so much so that they are borderline too heavy/unwieldy to be transported for use anywhere else...but I don't foresee me needing to carry them anywhere else to use, so it's all good I reckon.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The wheel chocks were not in the original design plans, and I honestly don't know why, they just never occurred to me to be something to incorporate.

How I came to realize they should be on the ramps is a story I may relate someday, as I'm sure everyone would get a good laugh out of it, but not going to do it just yet.

My dignity just won't allow me to publicly reveal my lapses in reason when they are that large and embarrassing.

Nuke
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Challenger owners rock. Now ramps. I will do this too..thanks OP.
IMO, getting the angled ends of the steps cut evenly (per board) and consistently (between ramps) is the key to making these worth the effort.

I attached a side pic of one of my ramps to give you an idea of what I ended up with. Sorry I can't provide the degrees of the angles, but I never measured them...I just eyeballed them the whole way (I know, that was not smartest way to go).

So measure life and cut fun, or whatever that old saying is. Cause if the steps' angles are too steep, it's difficult to ascend the ramps safely. And sloping them too much doesn't leave much room on last step to safely come to a stop. But somewhere in the middle is the butter zone, and that's what we're aiming for!

And all BS aside, I was very surprised at how easy it is to just drive right up the ramps now that I got em right. The 1st test of my franken-ramps was not much fun - I was effectively power-braking at each level trying to ascend each step w/ out pulling a Dukes of Hazzard and flying off the end.

But after giving up on the skill saw/hand saw combo I was using to make the angled cuts, I grabbed my sawz-all and went to town on 'em to get the next version of ramps. That turned out to be the ticket.

I feel like that still took more work than it should have, but that was the only other saw I had that could cut wood, so I made do. I can see now, it should have been my 1st choice!

Next project for The Nuke: taking a carpentry class or two so he doesn't spend several days doing one day's worth of wood work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
I'm not a huge woodworker but I did invest in a portable 10" table saw and a nice 12" sliding miter saw. They have paid for themselves in lack of frustration alone. My little Ryobi cordless circular saw is absolutely the best thing ever for quick cuts. Still prefer working on cars but woodworking is fun too.

Nice job on the ramps. I'll have to extend my rhino ramps with wood once I lower my R/T a little.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
IMO, getting the angled ends of the steps cut evenly (per board) and consistently (between ramps) is the key to making these worth the effort.

I attached a side pic of one of my ramps to give you an idea of what I ended up with. Sorry I can't provide the degrees of the angles, but I never measured them...I just eyeballed them the whole way (I know, that was not smartest way to go).

So measure life and cut fun, or whatever that old saying is. Cause if the steps' angles are too steep, it's difficult to ascend the ramps safely. And sloping them too much doesn't leave much room on last step to safely come to a stop. But somewhere in the middle is the butter zone, and that's what we're aiming for!

And all BS aside, I was very surprised at how easy it is to just drive right up the ramps now that I got em right. The 1st test of my franken-ramps was not much fun - I was effectively power-braking at each level trying to ascend each step w/ out pulling a Dukes of Hazzard and flying off the end.

But after giving up on the skill saw/hand saw combo I was using to make the angled cuts, I grabbed my sawz-all and went to town on 'em to get the next version of ramps. That turned out to be the ticket.

I feel like that still took more work than it should have, but that was the only other saw I had that could cut wood, so I made do. I can see now, it should have been my 1st choice!

Next project for The Nuke: taking a carpentry class or two so he doesn't spend several days doing one day's worth of wood work.


It appears as though the picture I thought I attached did not get attached. My apologies for that.


I will see if I still have it on my phone and attach it for real when I get back to the house later.


Nuke
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I'm not a huge woodworker but I did invest in a portable 10" table saw and a nice 12" sliding miter saw. They have paid for themselves in lack of frustration alone. My little Ryobi cordless circular saw is absolutely the best thing ever for quick cuts. Still prefer working on cars but woodworking is fun too.

Nice job on the ramps. I'll have to extend my rhino ramps with wood once I lower my R/T a little.


In my quest to find some ramps that would work, I did not try the Rhino ramps, but I probably should have.


After my attempt to get a set of the metal ramps to work ended in abject failure, I tried some plastic ones(cheap rhino knock-offs I suspect), but I didn't have much luck with them either. They kept wanting to slide forward on me as I tried to ascend, which drove me friggin' insane!


And I tried everything I could think of and find on the internet to mitigate that sliding nonsense. I even stooped to something called the beach towel method. WTF??? Yes, that's how desperate I was get something to work for my car.


At one point, I can remember being flat on my back in the garage after yet another hair-brained idea to stop sliding had failed, and I was just staring up at the ceiling, not looking at anything in particular but just wishing death upon the person that invented those ramps, over and over...seriously, I wanted him dead!!


And it's a good thing I bought that sawz-all to dismember his body(if I ever got the chance to kill him in the future), cause that turned out to be the tool I needed to finish his failed invention's successful replacements.


Which reminds me, I am late for my court-ordered therapy sessions.


Nuke, OUT!
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
It appears as though the picture I thought I attached did not get attached. My apologies for that.


I will see if I still have it on my phone and attach it for real when I get back to the house later.


Nuke
Already deleted the pic, but I was able to determine the degree of slope for the steps is approximately 25 degrees.

The device I used to measure that angle has 5 degrees as its smallest increment, so 25 is not exact, but it should be close enough.

If the boards I started with had been 12' instead of 10', I could have made each step a little longer and then been able to go as low as 20 degrees probably. That would be the absolute best angle I am thinking.

But since my Challenger's trunk could only accommodate boards that are 5' long and not 6', I had to settle for the 2"x10"x10' boards (had them cut at Lowes to fit in car).
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, so much so that they are borderline too heavy/unwieldy to be transported for use anywhere else...but I don't foresee me needing to carry them anywhere else to use, so it's all good I reckon.
Okay, I just made a liar out of myself last night. A friend, who is not mechanically inclined at all, called me up yesterday and needed some help with his wife's car. I didn't have much time though, I could stop by and take a quick look, but I would have to get back on the road pretty quickly.

The situation was perfect for a set of ramps, but all I had was my white elephants! No choice, I had to do it. So I lugged 'em out to the car and stacked them in my Challenger's trunk. They made the trip over to friend's house no problem, and we used them to get a look under his car with minimal effort and very little time spent.

Carrying the dang things to and from the car a few times got me to wondering how much they weighed, so I grabbed a bathroom scale to find out - 27lbs each. Not as heavy as I thought, but still not a very light load to sling around.

Anyway, just figured I'd update the thread for anyone that might think about making themselves a set. Yes, they will be heavy, bulky, and semi-unwieldy for anything other than use in the home garage where they reside. But if necessary, they are definitely able to fit in the trunk of the Challenger and make a trip somewhere else so they can save the day.

But don't forget the gloves! These things can get awful splinter-happy if you aren't careful!

Nuke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I've had something similar to this for a few months. Got a new jack for xmas from my parents and my father worried about it fitting under my car if I had a flat, so he made one of these but with 2 boards instead of 3. I keep it in my trunk for emergencies. Not like the trunk is good for anything else with a full size spare and portable floor jack.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I've had something similar to this for a few months. Got a new jack for xmas from my parents and my father worried about it fitting under my car if I had a flat, so he made one of these but with 2 boards instead of 3. I keep it in my trunk for emergencies. Not like the trunk is good for anything else with a full size spare and portable floor jack.
That spare tire well seemed too valuable a space to be wasted on a spare tire to me, so I keep tools and flashlights and such in there along with a tire plug kit and a 12v air compressor for flats. I'm covered for the occasional flat, but I'll be hosed if I have a blow out.

Luckily I haven't had any blowouts yet in 80K miles of driving, but I have had 2 flats I was able to plug, air up, and keep going on, so I haven't been left stranded by "smart idea" yet.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top