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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I can't believe my battery is shot! I drove the Challenger into the garage only 5 days ago. Since I was disconnecting electrical connectors, I decided to disconnect the battery to be safe. Instead of disconnecting the positive post AT THE BATTERY, I disconnected the positive post under the hood at the location where you can hook up jumper cables. I figured the power came from the battery forward to that post where it then goes into the fuse box. Disconnect the cable, and it should kill power to the fuse box, or so I thought.

I went to test the LEDs today, and no power in the battery. That can't be right, I though. Took a voltmeter to the battery posts, I got absolutely NOTHING. Not even 1 volt. I just threw it on a charger at 10 amps, will leave it there for 1-2 hours, then trickle charge it over night. I really don't think it's gonna hold a charge.

Bet that cost a good $200-$300 to replace. Why did my battery die in only 4 days? Nothing was turned on! I wonder if the warranty would cover it??

Learn from my mistake guys...
 

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You should always disconnect the Negative cable at the battery first.
 

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The positive cable that you disconnected was probably touching ground somewhere for 4 days you are lucky the battery didn't explode !!!
 

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If the battery has been fine..and it isn't disharged and got frozen(how cold is it?)

I bet it just got discharged somehow or other. Perhaps by not unhooking the ground at the battery...

Probably has positive leads powering up multiple positive 'hot points' on the car..possibly unhooking the main power lead under the hood..caused some logic circuit/can-bus circuit to back feed..draining the battery quick. Just a theory...I'm not all that familiar with the wiring on Challengers.

And batterys do just up and die
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The positive cable that you disconnected was probably touching ground somewhere for 4 days you are lucky the battery didn't explode !!!

No chance, my friend, I had the cable that I disconnected inside a bag to keep that from happening. Somehow by disconnecting that positive cable at the jumper point, it turned on some electrical circuit(s).

I know you're supposed to disconnect the negative first to prevent your wrench from hitting something metal while disconnecting the positive, really, I'm always careful.

Lesson learned. I'm posting this so other's don't make my mistake.
 

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So is it taking a charge? Inquiring minds want to know.
 

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my battery leaked acid all over the negative cable and ate away the nut holding the clamp on the battery. took it in to dealer and he replaced battery under warranty!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I checked the volts this AM after 3 hours on a 10 amp charge last night followed by a 2 amp charge overnight. Volts this AM were 12.93 while on the charger. I then took it OFF the charger, and watched as the volts dropped very slowly. After 1 minute, the volts were 12.83, so I'll leave it off the charger for the morning and see how far it drops by noon. If it levels out and stops dropping, I'll disconnect that post up front again, and reconnect the positive post at the battery, then monitor over a hour to see what kind of drop I get.

If it won't hold a charge, or has to be kept on a trickle charger to generate enough charge to start the car consistently, then I'll drive it to the dealership and let them test the battery. It should fail, and I don't see why they won't replace it under warranty. Normally I don't like doing something like that if I was at fault, I'd rather pay out of pocket instead of using the warranty so I sleep well at night, but I don't feel that way in this case because I don't see why disconnecting the positive post up front should drain the battery. None the less, I won't ever do that again.
 

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Are you sure you are disconnecting the battery when you disconnect the wire in the front? Does it go there first and then to the rest of the car? Did everything go off when you looked, like lights, radio, etc.? I don't think disconnecting the positive terminal is the right way to remove power from your vehicle. All it takes it just the negative and you should be okay. Get a metric set of sockets and disconnect the wire from the bracket by the battery, not from the battery terminal.
 

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As I read the wiring diagram in the service manual, the rear PDC (power distribution center) is fed directly from one wire on the positive battery connector and another cable goes to the front of the car to the jumper post.

Therefore disconnecting the battery cable under the hood leaves everything fed by the rear PDC connected to the battery.

So the OP's guidance to not repeat his error is good advice.:thumbsup:
 

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I can't believe my battery is shot! I drove the Challenger into the garage only 5 days ago. Since I was disconnecting electrical connectors, I decided to disconnect the battery to be safe. Instead of disconnecting the positive post AT THE BATTERY, I disconnected the positive post under the hood at the location where you can hook up jumper cables. I figured the power came from the battery forward to that post where it then goes into the fuse box. Disconnect the cable, and it should kill power to the fuse box, or so I thought.

I went to test the LEDs today, and no power in the battery. That can't be right, I though. Took a voltmeter to the battery posts, I got absolutely NOTHING. Not even 1 volt. I just threw it on a charger at 10 amps, will leave it there for 1-2 hours, then trickle charge it over night. I really don't think it's gonna hold a charge.

Bet that cost a good $200-$300 to replace. Why did my battery die in only 4 days? Nothing was turned on! I wonder if the warranty would cover it??

Learn from my mistake guys...
If your spending 200-300$ you should be paying for a Odyssey battery, not factory, factory battery is about 80-100$(screw Optima, over-priced crap that dies right after the warranty is over)
 

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2016 Challenger Hellcat, Plum Crazy Purple, A8 (Grape Ape)
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That factory battery is $180 or more. All the parts stores list one for our cars in the same price range. Hope they do it under warranty if it's shot. I replaced mine when it went out with a Wal-Mart battery for a whopping $77. :) It comes with a TOTAL FREE replacement 3 year warranty.
 

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I know you're supposed to disconnect the negative first to prevent your wrench from hitting something metal while disconnecting the positive, really, I'm always careful.
Years ago, a friend of mine was disconnecting his battery, positive first, and the wrench accidently touched the fender. Sparks flew, the wrench got really hot, really fast, and welded itself to the fender. He jumped back when it happened and all he could do was wait for it to cool down. He had to break the wrench off from the fender somehow. He was lucky the battery didn't explode in his face. Afterward, he had a lot more respect for the current a car battery is capable of putting out and disconnected the negative cable first.:bowdown:
 

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Back in my engine shop teaching days I had one of my students show up with an eye patched up and his face all marked up. He had an after-school job at a junk yard and made a spark around a battery and it exploded. Fortunately, he didn't lose his sight. Nothing like having a sulfuric acid explosion in your face.

I always sniff around a battery before connecting jumpers, etc. If I smell any acid fumes I leave it alone. Another jumper cable tip is to make the ground connection to the frame or engine away from the battery - not to the ground terminal itself. And, as someone mentioned before, disconnect the battery's ground first and reconnect last. That prevents problems like the guy had that welded his wrench to the fender.

Here's another battery story: Years ago I was working at a Chrysler/Plymouth dealer. The head mechanic was working around an alternator with his wedding ring on. He got the ring between the hot post on the alternator and the block. It turned red hot on his finger instantly - burned the heck out of him. I never wore rings when working on cars after that.

BTW, Spudracer, I'll bet your battery is fine. You just drained it. Check the water (electrolyte) level when you get a chance, though, and don't overcharge it.

Bill
 

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I checked the volts this AM after 3 hours on a 10 amp charge last night followed by a 2 amp charge overnight. Volts this AM were 12.93 while on the charger. I then took it OFF the charger, and watched as the volts dropped very slowly. After 1 minute, the volts were 12.83, so I'll leave it off the charger for the morning and see how far it drops by noon. If it levels out and stops dropping, I'll disconnect that post up front again, and reconnect the positive post at the battery, then monitor over a hour to see what kind of drop I get.

If it won't hold a charge, or has to be kept on a trickle charger to generate enough charge to start the car consistently, then I'll drive it to the dealership and let them test the battery. It should fail, and I don't see why they won't replace it under warranty. Normally I don't like doing something like that if I was at fault, I'd rather pay out of pocket instead of using the warranty so I sleep well at night, but I don't feel that way in this case because I don't see why disconnecting the positive post up front should drain the battery. None the less, I won't ever do that again.
After you have the battery fully charged, make sure the battery terminals and posts are clean and tight. Hook up a Voltmeter and crank the engine if it drops below 10.8 Volts when cranking the battery needs replacement. If it stays above that and the voltage steadily drops when nothing is turned on then you have a current draw somewhere. Both of which should be covered under warranty.
 

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years back..my employer was getting fuel in his pickup...Truck wouldn't start after he fueled..so he was working at cleaning the battery cables..and shorted out his wrist watch across the positive terminal to the fender..burned his wrist pretty bad.

That's when I learned the value of taking the ground cable loose before jacking around with the battery..starter..or altenator.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I rechecked the volts at 1pm today, 5 hours after taking it off the charger, it was 12.58 volts. While not a full charge, I think that may be enough to start the engine and not have to replace it for now.

 

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I rechecked the volts at 1pm today, 5 hours after taking it off the charger, it was 12.58 volts. While not a full charge, I think that may be enough to start the engine and not have to replace it for now.
It should be OK but you should still make sure all the cables are clean and tight test it under load cranking the engine , and also make sure it is charging when the car is running.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the tip.

More information... I was sitting in the car last night, working on the wiring for the halos, adn kept hearing whirring and popping sounds inside the car. The door was open. Sounded like it was coming from behind the dash.

This morning, I went to pull out the radio to hook up the new front-mount camera, and it was warm to the touch. That is NOT normal. The surrounding dash and the frame behind was cold, but the radio was warm. Before I yanked it out, I checked it and it appears to be working fine.

Confused...
 
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