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To those of you suffering the 5.7 Hemi "tick", especially at cold start up at idle- Anyone tried adding extra sound damping material to the underside of the engine cover? Just laying a bunch of rags on top muffles it quite a bit. Anyone tried Boom Mat or something similar?
 

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To those of you suffering the 5.7 Hemi 'tick', especially at cold start up at idle. Anyone tried adding extra sound damping material to the underside of the engine cover? Just laying a bunch of rags on top muffles it quite a bit. Anyone tried Boom Mat? or something similar?
Do you still have the factory engine cover on your car? Some guys pull them off to make catch can installation easier, or to reduce the amount of heat they trap. Also, does it tick other than the startup clatter? I just bought a new 2018 R/T 5.7, and fortunately it's quiet (only 900 miles on it). I have had startup clatter only on a couple of occasions but not too worried about it. No noise when running other than the injectors doing their thing. One trick you can do is to hold both the brake and gas pedal to the floor then start it...it kills the injectors but runs the oil pump. It just cranks without firing. That way you can oil the system up a little before hard-starting it. It helps. I actually crank for ten seconds after an oil change to make sure the filter is full and the fluids are up at the top. To kill the cranking, you have to turn the ignition off then restart as normal.
 

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I guess I may be talking about two different 'ticks.' There's the start up clatter that you described and there is a steady tick at cruising speeds. I'm hoping some quality hi temp sound proofing will muffle both to some degree. I love your idea to pre-lube the valve train before start up. My car just sits in the garage most of the time so I'll be using that trick before every start up. I don't know offhand if my car will crank in neutral, if not, I'll have to borrow a third foot for the clutch pedal. I'll work something out. Thanks for your help.
 

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I guess I may be talking about two different 'ticks.' There's the start up clatter that you described and there is a steady tick at cruising speeds. I'm hoping some quality hi temp sound proofing will muffle both to some degree. I love your idea to pre-lube the valve train before start up. My car just sits in the garage most of the time so I'll be using that trick before every start up. I don't know offhand if my car will crank in neutral, if not, I'll have to borrow a third foot for the clutch pedal. I'll work something out. Thanks for your help.
Good question...if you have a manual, I think only the clutch needs to be applied to start and the parking brake engaged, but not the brake pedal pressed. I know with my A8 I need to press the brake to start it, leaving my right foot free to press the gas pedal to the floor if I want to just crank it.

For the constant ticking while running, I know what you mean...I had a 2014 R/T 5.7 A8 that developed a running tick that sounded like it was coming through the firewall on the passenger side. Could have been a lifter or broken exhaust manifold bolt (not uncommon), but I never took it to the dealer to be checked. That was one reason I traded it for a 2015 Scat Pack A8. The 6.4 engine ran beautifully..never one issue. For my 2018 R/T 5.7, I was worried about the ticking, but so far it's wonderfully quiet (only 900 miles, though). But I found the only time I get startup clatter is if I move it very short distances, like from the driveway to the street. But it never clatters when I restart it otherwise.

Let us know if you've found a way to quiet it down. Cheers!
 
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Clearing a Flooded Engine (Using ENGINE START/STOP Button) – Manual Transmission Only

If the engine fails to start after you have followed the “Normal Starting” or “Extreme Cold Weather ​procedures, it may be flooded. To clear any excess fuel, press and hold the clutch pedal, push the accelerator pedal all the way to the floor and hold it, then press and hold the ENGINE START/STOP button for no more than 15 seconds.​

Release the accelerator pedal and the clutch pedal, wait 10 to 15 seconds, then repeat the “Normal Starting” procedure.​
A Guy
 
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To those of you suffering the 5.7 Hemi "tick", especially at cold start up at idle- Anyone tried adding extra sound damping material to the underside of the engine cover? Just laying a bunch of rags on top muffles it quite a bit. Anyone tried Boom Mat or something similar?
What type of oil are you using? Often, a quality synthetic oil, like Mobil 1, will eliminate or greatly reduce the ticking sound.

I use Mobil 1 0W-40 in my 6.1 and never had a tick.
 

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I thought about removing the little piece of factory sound deadener and going with something good and thick to help quiet the clatter on my 14 but never did, I had more of the sewing machine sound than the tick but still got annoying at times.

Different oil or additives doesn't seem to help, your engine either makes noise or it doesn't. The 6.4L engines seem to be much quieter in general so definitely happy about that on my 16.



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I don't really know what's in there. I drove it home from the dealership with fresh oil and only drove it a few weeks before I put it up for the winter. First thing tthis coming spring I'll give her a dose of quality synthetic.
 

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Probably won't make a difference, if anything sometimes a good old thick dino oil will run quieter. If you have an M6 you can go thicker up to 40W but still might not help, it's just the non-adjustable valve train on these engines that won't let you adjust the slop and ticking out.




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The only thing I have found that will quiet a noisy engine is fresh oil. Fresh oil won't work a miracle and quiet a "tick" (the tick may not from something the oil is even in contact with) but it lowers the overall volume of noise emanating from the engine.

In my experience the decrease in noise is the same -- at least I can't tell the difference -- refilling with 0w-40 or 5w-50 oils, both of which are approved by the car maker for my cars. And with both oils come 5K miles later the engine is just as noisy no matter the oil.

You can experiment with different oils. If the factory allows for the usage, choose the "heaviest" oil approved for use in your area where you live and drive. By "heaviest" I mean if for example the factory approves the use of 0w-20, 0w-30, 5w-20, or 5w-30, you can use either 0w-30 or 5w-30. The 'w' is the oil's viscosity at 32F and the lower the number the better the oil flow at colder temperatures. The higher number (20 or 30 in this case) is the oil's viscosity at 212F. It may be a 0w-30 oil is "better" than a 5w-30 oil because the 0w-30 oil will flow better upon cold start and more quickly refill/recharge the hydraulic lifters with oil and quiet them down. (This of course assumes the noise is due to lifters than have bled down and have retained some air. If the noise is from some other part of the engine's valve system the oil may not have any benefit.)

My experience such as it is is not with the xW-20 or xW-30 oils but with as I mentioned above with the 0w-40 and 5w-50 oils and relying upon the oil pressure gauge in one of my cars I can't tell the difference based on the oil pressure reading which oil is in the engine. Hot idle oil pressure is so close to the same I can't see any difference.

While there can be a difference in hot idle oil pressure any difference in hot idle oil pressure is from the oil's temperature -- which I know indirectly based on what the coolant temperature is -- and this is in a large part affected by the ambient temperature. A cold day will have the hot idle oil pressure up a bit compared to a hot day. This is because on a cold day the engine's operating temperature is lower -- the engine's coolant temperature is lower -- and the oil temperature is likewise lower than it would be on a hot day.

I'll mention this but I don't necessasrily recommend it. For cars that are used infrequently to help reduce the cold start valve clatter some techs recommend using Swepco 502 Oil Improver oil additive. Here's a link:

SWEPCO 502 Premium Engine Oil Improver | Southwestern Petroleum Corporation

This additive contains 200ppm of molybdenum in micro-sized form. (I had a sample analyzed.)

Chrysler (like I bet all auto makers) advises against using any oil additive and you should follow the automaker on this, but I note this Swepco has moly in it which is what Chrysler touts -- I read somewhere but I have not found an official source for this -- as being important ingredient in the oil it recommends for some of its engines.

But fooling with oils may just be wasting your time.

There is another way you can handle this.

Take the car back and complain about the noise. Because of the noise which you feel is not *normal* is indicative of a pending internal engine problem and you are concerned the engine could suffer some failure at any time.

Say something to the effect if this happens while you are driving on a busy highway/freeway with dense and fast moving traffic this could be a safety issue. Because of this concern for the safety of yourself and that of any passengers and other drivers on the road you have lost all enjoyment of use of the car.

Remind the dealer one major factor in your decision to buy the car there was because of the dealer's highly touted factory trained service department.

When you have your car in for service, possibly a warranty issue, the dealer can't just throw up its hands and give up. You are owed a reasonable degree of skill, experience, and care when you have your car in to the dealer that sells/services the brand of car. If you don't get this this could be consumer fraud.

If the dealer can't fix this noise then the dealer has misrepresented its capabilities to you and you believe you could be a victim of consumer fraud.

Unless the dealer can resolve this ticking problem to your satisfaction you will have to speak to the local consumer fraud division to find out what your options are -- be able to state the address, phone number of this office -- and contact the factory to file a formal complaint about this dealership.

Oh, and if you get the "they all do that", and you will, ask for a demonstration. Have a dealer employee start and let idle a few cars comparable to yours to see if they all tick.

Be prepared to leave the car. If the dealer can convince you to take the car again you lose. The dealer takes this as a sign you'll accept the car as is. Since you are having to leave the new car you should get a loaner.

You want to remain calm, stay cool, but be firm that the car's noise is *not* normal, *not* acceptable, and the dealer being a Dodge dealer should be able to address this problem to your satisfaction.
 
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