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20012 srt. 31,000 mi. Original tires, showing cord on inside both front tires. 50% tread on face of tires. Had to purchase new tires, front end not out of alignment. Dealer tells me this is common on all srt models. They are factory set this way for handling purposes. And can’t be corrected! I am disappointed with this news. They say only way to slow the wear down, is to rotate tires every 3,000 mi. So plan on replacing tires every 35,000 mi. We bought this car new in 2012, love the car, hate this news! Anyone else find this happening to them?
 

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All the models of these cars come with negative camber to a certain degree for increased cornering response. You cant really correct it without aftermarket components that allow you to readjust the camber.

You need to rotate tires more frequently or you will be paying for more tires. If you do readjust the camber from factory specs, it will handle worse taking corners.

I will say 31,000 miles is pretty decent on a set of tires though considering I go through drag radials in about 9,000.
 

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Tire wear

Yup! That’s what I’ve been told. Thanx for the feed back, guess I’ll live with it.
 

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20012 srt. 31,000 mi. Original tires, showing cord on inside both front tires. 50% tread on face of tires. Had to purchase new tires, front end not out of alignment. Dealer tells me this is common on all srt models. They are factory set this way for handling purposes. And can’t be corrected! I am disappointed with this news. They say only way to slow the wear down, is to rotate tires every 3,000 mi. So plan on replacing tires every 35,000 mi. We bought this car new in 2012, love the car, hate this news! Anyone else find this happening to them?
My experience over the years is excessive/uneven inner (or outer) tire wear at the edges is a toe problem and toe should be adjustable.

(With access under the car you can measure toe with a tape measure. At a point midway up the leading surface of the front tires measure the distance between the center of the tires. Then at a point midway up the trailing surface of the front tires measure the same dimension. The difference is "toe". Often toe is given in degrees (0.0 to 0.04 degs./wheel or 0.0 to 0.17 degs. total toe). With 0.0 total toe the front and rear measurements shoudl be the same. There probably wants to be a little bit of toe (in at the front) because underway the suspension bushings are compressed a bit and the tires move back a bit and obtain a more straight ahead position.)

Camber doesn't appear to be a real factor even though when the car is stationary a car with a large amount of camber -- negative camber -- the tires look like they ride only on the inner edges. (Both of my current cars, Porsches, have -1.5 degs. at each rear tire camber. (Front camber is 0.0.)

But how the tires look stationary is not how they actually are when the car is under way. The tires flatten out and make full and even contact with the pavement. Without much effort -- other than controlling my right foot -- I manage 20K+ miles from the rear tires on both of my cars and one has 413hp and weighs in at around 3400lbs and goes 0 to 60mph in 4.2 seconds and has a top speed of 189mph.

Not camber. Toe.

You need to book the car in for an alignment and have the toe set correctly. Camber is probably not adjustable on these cars although in the past for another car I made special eccentric bushings to replace the factory bushings in the wishbones and by turning the eccentric bushing cambe was adjustable. One might not need to make his own bushings. Aftermarket hardware to allow for adjusting that which is not adjustable from the factory are common.

Did a quick search and found this:

https://www.carid.com/eibach/pro-alignment-front-camber-control-arm-kit-mpn-5-66045k.html?singleid=107764628&url=81122168

There may be offerings by other companies, but Eibach ain't chopped liver.

Added: Forgot to mention in some cases camber (and even caster) can be changed (although generally not by much but often one doesn't need much) by moving the strut about at the top of the strut tower. There can be just enough clearance to loosen the fasteners and move the strut top in the right direction to bring camber or caster into spec. 'course this should be done by a trained tech with the car on an alignment rack so the tech can make sure the new position delivers the desired alignment values. And after other settings (toe for instance) may need tweaking to bring it back into spec. Sometimes there is aftermarket hardware -- camber plates -- that allows for even more adjustment at the strut tower top.

Did a search and found these:

https://www.carid.com/hr/camber-plates.html
 

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Eneven wear will happen on any vehicle that doesn't get regular tire rotations. It's just a matter of time, and some are worse than others. The reason is that no matter how perfect your alignment is set, it is always changing in some way as you drive. Every corner you take, every weight transfer, every bump, etc. Your tires change angle in some way and different parts of the tread are subject to different loads. It adds up over time. By rotating the tires, you are distributing those loads across all the tires, and reducing the uneven wear effect they will have.

Based on what you've said, I wouldn't be worried about your car. You said your alignment is in spec, and 31,000 miles on the original tires is doing very good. I would fully expect them to be at the wear bars before that.
 
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