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Google Track Day Insurance . Many provide insurance for what they call High Performance Driver’s Education (HPDE)


A Guy
 

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depending 400 to 1k per weekend, 10% deductible
 

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ps you hit the wall at a dragstrip, same thing no insurance coverage
 

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Camaros and Vette's have experienced some significant issues with ice mode, if i recall what happened to this one
 

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2019 Hellcat Red Eye Widebody
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I looked into track insurance before going to HPDE my red eye at the NCM track last October. What Steve said - expensive and high deductibles. For a car I valued at $80,000 (I think, I might have lowered it a bit) I had the option of paying about $540 for two days of road course driving (HPDE is not racing - solid rules about passing in less experienced classes apply) with a $15,000 deductible, or about $590 with a $10,000 deductible. It does cover stuff besides damage to your car - like things you could damage on the track like guardrails, fluid spills, etc. But you'd probably have to put your car into the grandstand to get above those deductibles. You sign a waiver saying you can't sue other drivers or the track owners or the sponsors of the event.

I decided not to buy it, but I own my car outright and if it gets bashed up with damage less than the deductible I'm paying for it with or without track insurance. Above that - almost have to total the car. I could install the engine in my lawn mower I suppose...

The good thing about HPDE, especially in the Novice Class, is the sponsor provides a free instructor who will coach you. I hit it off great with mine - we were like two kids having a blast out there. You don't have to push it beyond your comfort level and so if you are self-disciplined about not exceeding your or the car's limitations I feel it is safe. At least safe enough. I'm going to do it again this season and I won't buy insurance, but it is all about the car owner's peace of mind.

Best,

Finface
 

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Even the Bondurant track day comes with a risk. Yes they offer you insurance at $75 per day but the deductible is $8,000!!! If you pass on the insurance, you are responsible for all damages that you cause.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Wow insurance is expensive for you all. I do HPDE at Michelin Road Atlanta (concrete jungle) and it's only $220 with a 10% deductible. I use Hagerty. You can get an instant quote for an event through their website. I always joke and say it's the best $220 that I spend every event.

Also, the $220 covers my mods as well.. sway bars, strut braces, etc.
 

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My quote was for an $80,000 2019 Red Eye. A 10% deductible sounds better. My quote had hard numbers of $10,000 or $15,000, depending on the premium you decided to pay.
 

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Someone has gone off course every track day I've ever been to by driving stupid. If you're actually planning on racing it might be worth getting insurance but if you're just doing open track days then there is no reason to push your car to the point of loss of control. My advice would be to buy a good helmet and start with autocross, then move over to open track days with an instructor once you've become comfortable with your car.
 

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I think your points and advice are good. I will say though, that part of the point, at least of the high performance driving events, is to discover the limits of your car and ability, and in doing that, one will have an occasional off-course excursion. I've done it a few times. One could label it stupid, one could say I discovered the limit and now know how hard to push. In the notable one I'm thinking of right now, at the Wild Horse Pass east track, turn 1, I was working on late braking, and found the point where it was too late. That was HPDE 1, had an instructor sitting next to me in my car, and it was a good point for us to discuss. Didn't hurt anything, drove back on the track and next time around braked earlier and all was well. That also was a good element in discovering what in my car needed improvement. So it now has 4 piston Brembos all around and much, much better tires than the stock size Ohtsu made in Thailand tires I was running at that point, and most importantly, I know where one needs to brake and still get around a greater than 90-degree corner.
 

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Davesanrn and All,

This year's HPDE events that I was planning on driving in so far have been cancelled due to the coronavirus so I only have my one and only HPDE event last year at National Corvette Museum's track to comment upon. Two Camaro's went off the track on a beautiful October day, one suffered some left rear fender damage (I hope that was all) when it slid off track sideways the morning of the first track day. It happened on the deceptively gentle uphill right turn after the sharp left hairpin - a turn called Deception which in the brief they made a point of saying was easy to swing wide on and bump onto some pretty severe warning bumps and even go off track. I did not study any books on race track/HPDE driving before I participated - my Novice Class instructor did not exhort me to go faster than I was comfortable driving - and even so I think I got a little lucky. I twice got two wheels up on those Deception warning bump's and they really rattled the car and us. I didn't carry as much speed into it the third lap, and I was coached to turn towards the apex a little later, and the turn became much more enjoyable! The book I'm reading now - Skip Barbers "Going Faster" describes what I did as a common and often destructive mistake. It's called "Early Apex" and means you start turning in from the outside of the track too early. Feels great - it is a natural instinct to want to turn in early - until you start exiting the turn and the geometry of the radius you've committed to becomes an increasing radius turn instead of the desired constant radius. You begin to feel, and the see, yourself going wider and wider past the apex and your must turn the wheel more. If going too fast for the available traction of your tires, and you haven't seen this coming early enough to brake while you stilll can, you WILL go off the track. So, yes, it's about finding the limits of our car's cornering ability and it is a heck of a good time. Some corners you fail to negotiate you just go off into the sand, or the grass. Some you're going to impact something. When I do this again I plan on being as careful as I was the first time (good luck I can hear people chuckling) - which still felt like Hell on Wheels fun.

And about learning the "brake threshold" point you discovered - THAT was the scariest thing for me. Our Challengers are FAST cars on the straightaways. I got up to 126 mph on the longest one at NCM, my fellow Hellcat owner got his up to 145 mph. After that long straight you have a pretty sharp right hand turn. I could not, and don't want, to really test the limits of my driving, or the car, by blowing it there. 126 mph, and lifting off the gas early, and braking easier and earlier than I had to...that kept it safe and sane for me.

Best,

Finface
 

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I'm with you. At that same Wild Horse Pass track, is a corner that it took me several events to even start to get a handle on, that they call the "carousel." For my car, the best way was to "diamond the corner" NASCAR style. (I've actually found a lot of NASCAR techniques seem to work, at least at my level of skill, with this car. Makes sense, heavy cars, mine not quite as overpowered as them, haha). I just had such a hard time trusting the car would rotate. My instructor drove my car through one time with me as a passenger, and I suddenly realized that a stock R/T on hard cheap tires had a ton of potential. Once I learned to trust it and that late braking HARD in that corner, and rotating with steering and the loud pedal, worked really well. That was an epiphany and a hell of a lot of fun. I wouldn't say I'm good at that, and haven't been on the track since Chuckwalla which was, February if I remember right. But I am having fun and I look forward to it all. Fingers crossed that Auto Club is on next weekend.
 

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So, begs the question. If you are doing a track day, and someone screws up and collects you in their crash, is it on them like an at fault accident on the road?

A Guy
 

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So, begs the question. If you are doing a track day, and someone screws up and collects you in their crash, is it on them like an at fault accident on the road?

A Guy
Nope. All your fault, can't go after the others, usually in the giant indemnification we sign at the gate.

Also, early apex is the SAFEST way to do corners for a novice. That leaves room in the corner just in case the novice does need more time and distance to turn the car. Too much speed, and late apex; that is your recipe for running off the road because you have run out of room.
 
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