Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I live in a master planned community, HOA, etc. When I take my trash containers out on trash days, I can shake by neighbor's hand across the standard building code regulation 4.8756' high brick wall. Or peak into their bedroom. Each house is that close to each other.

I know a few guys that live out in the rural areas, where they have 3-5 acre parcel of land. And both of them have complain about their neighbors. The houses are pretty much centered on the property, so there could be 5-8 acre between house to house.

I'm wondering, what's to complain about? Aren't they way too far from each other? Or is it human nature to always complain about your neighbors?

I grew up in apartments 750 sq ft 2bd. I'm sure everything would bother me if I was to live in a small apartment again.

In my old age, I'm starting to feel like I need to move "away from people." Anyone made such transition can share their experiences?

I'm "dreaming" of 3-5 acre of land to live on.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
Joined
·
13,572 Posts
Possible when you pay for more space, your expectations of isolation also increase. If you buy 30 acres, you may not want to even be able to tell you have neighbors, etc.

A Guy
 

·
Registered
2016 Challenger SRT
Joined
·
3,701 Posts
Well, you know the saying good fences make good neighbors? I’ve been waiting on a new home build in a subdivision where the houses are very close to one another on 0.24 acre lots. First, the guy behind me put up his fence that ran the length of the lot. Then, the house next to me on the left put up his fence on the same day a surveyor was out doing my lot. When I looked at the neighbor’s fence, it appeared to be over the property line on my lot!
I immediately contacted the developer who had the surveyor go out and resurvey all of the exterior lot lines.
Shortly afterwards I went out there to find the entire fence had been moved back several few inches lol.
I haven’t even met my neighbors yet (closing on the home next week), but I have a feeling that, between the fence having to be moved and their yapping dog, it’s gonna take some getting used to Living on a postage stamp. My last town in NH had a minimum of 2 acre zoning which was great! Deer, wild turkeys and other critters were preferable to people as far as I was concerned. Two acres and up works for me, and in my case, good fences don’t always make for good neighbors!
 

·
Registered
2015 SRT, 6 Speed, Sublime Green
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
I used to live in a suburban neighborhood where the houses were 12’ apart. It was a great place to live and raise the family. After I retired I wanted to experience rural living. We now live in the woods on 2.7 acres. The houses are well spaced apart and I have no complaints about any neighbors. To be fair, I didn’t have a lot of complaints in the old house either though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I live in a craftsman house that is over 100 years old. It is small & the wife and I have outgrown it. The only thing keeping us here is the garage and the extra parking on the property. I do not interact at all with my next door neighbors & only speak to neighbors that live on adjoining streets while walking my dog. It is best to try & keep complaints about neighbors down to a minimum. Getting into disputes with your neighbors never ends well. We have some of that going on in the block where I reside and I am not part of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
When we moved to Florida I went from .5 acre lot to a .24 acre lot. Pretty much standard here. I had my whole back yard fenced in before we moved in. Pool privacy and us and our neighbors both have dogs. I did just the opposite. We had the fence put around 6” on our property. The fence guy said it saves a lot of hassle and he was right. My neighbor started to question the fence and when I told them they were gaining 6/8” he smiled and walked away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
I had an issue with my neighbor over the property line. He claimed my fence was encroaching about 8” on his property & wanted the fence moved which had been there for years. I told him to look up adverse possession & I never heard further. I was the one who paid $1k for a survey & he wouldn’t contribute to the cost but wanted the fence moved afterwards.
 

·
Registered
2016 Challenger SRT
Joined
·
3,701 Posts
I had an issue with my neighbor over the property line. He claimed my fence was encroaching about 8” on his property & wanted the fence moved which had been there for years. I told him to look up adverse possession & I never heard further. I was the one who paid $1k for a survey & he wouldn’t contribute to the cost but wanted the fence moved afterwards.
So was your fence on his property or not? Adverse possession is exactly what I wanted to prevent sometime in the future. I told the Construction Supervisor, if it was found that the fence was indeed placed on my property, it either had to be moved back accordingly, or be incorporated into the deed as part of the property. Faced with those two choices, it was no surprise the fence moved back rather quickly.
I honestly wasn’t trying to be a hard ass. I knew from prior real estate experience over the years that it was better to deal with the situation now to avoid future potential problems over the lot line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
So was your fence on his property or not? Adverse possession is exactly what I wanted to prevent sometime in the future. I told the Construction Supervisor, if it was found that the fence was indeed placed on my property, it either had to be moved back accordingly, or be incorporated into the deed as part of the property. Faced with those two choices, it was no surprise the fence moved back rather quickly.
I honestly wasn’t trying to be a hard ass. I knew from prior real estate experience over the years that it was better to deal with the situation now to avoid future potential problems over the lot line.
I agree with you about keeping your fences within your property boundaries. When I bought the property, the fence was already there. He didn't know this until after I had the property surveyed. This was in 1990. The fence encroaches a few inches into the neighbor's property. If I were to move the fence back to the property line, I could not get in to clean out and clean up a strip of land behind my 50' long garage. The garage was built by the previous owner in the early 80's. The lots were subdivided on my street over 100 years ago into 50 x 150 town lots.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,730 Posts
All new housing subdivisions around here are design to maximize the number of houses they can fit into the available land. The cul-de-sac I live on is no exception. In fact, I’m tall enough (6’8”) that when I step out of my back door and onto the back porch, I can see that 3 out of my closest 6 neighbors have identical backyard storage sheds.

The fact that the sheds are identical can be attributed to HOA guidelines on outside storage, but the fact that I can see into the backyards of the 6 closest people to me so clearly as to be able to determine who has a storage shed and even compare/contrast those sheds, well that’s attributable to their extreme proximity to me (zero lot-line?).
 

·
Registered
Boosted 2014 R/T Shaker M6
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
I would never purchase property that has anything to do with an HOA. Twenty years ago I was looking forward to purchasing eighty acres with a well on it for $40K. Then I found out there was an HOA...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,730 Posts
HOA is like the Borg - sooner or later you will be assimilated.
 

·
Registered
Boosted 2014 R/T Shaker M6
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
HOA is like the Borg - sooner or later you will be assimilated.
Not true. I own my home and property outright, and have my title in a safe place. You will only be assimilated if you allow the cretins to get near the title, contorting it forever...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,730 Posts
Not true. I own my home and property outright, and have my title in a safe place. You will only be assimilated if you allow the cretins to get near the title, contorting it forever...
Not to be cliche, but it will truly be easier if you just give in and assimilate now.

Or you can fight and fight and get assimilated later...

The choice is yours, Locutus, err, I mean @Gila Hemi.

980397

980398

980399
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,689 Posts
OP,
more often than not, rural areas &/or properties with acreage have farm animals, rural/industrial activities or people that want to live without rules or consideration for others around them. This is often why people move out of urban areas, so they can be left alone to do - whatever.
We have a house on 3.5 beautifully wooded acreas, as well as another, newer house on 1.75 acres. The neighbor that runs up 1 side of our 3.5 parcel has been a literal nightmare. She's an old nazi (literally, has swatzikas in the trees, on roofs, portraits of hitler on out buildings, hates the entire world mentality) who up and decided to makeshift open an illegal chicken/goat/sheep breeding farm about 2.5 yrs ago. Her unlawful activeties run the gamit from illegal chemical burning, toxic waste dumping, custoemr traffic 24/7, to other things too sick to mention. We are THREE fences deep on the property line (1st is 6ft chain link w/ barbed wire to keep her animals and workers from tresspassing - which was a daily occurrence, second is 8ft. double layer soft sound barrier because, well roosters, sheep & workers are not quiet, final is 8ft cosmetic cedar plank, to hide all the previous from our view) This is all topped with lighting & cams to monitor our property. To say this cost us considerable $$ to do along half of the property line is an understatement.
Every local & state authority is involved, we have two attorneys working on multiple court cases and yet noone can seem to shut her down, because her property size allows for "agricultural activity" and she will comply with enforcement notices for a few weeks, then go right back to her previous behavior. Her effect on the entire surroundog community is absurb.
By contrast, our 1.75 acre house has wonderful , very quiet nieghbors all around, we all look out for each other and any issues that come up can be peacefully worked out. Its non HOA but has a road association, yearly meetings, BBQ, etc. One would thik it would be the opposite, buts its not. The contrast is striking.

I say all this, because more space doesnt always equal more peace or peace of mind. Bigger properties can be alot more work to maintain. When one lives in more urban areas, you also get used to a certain level of neighbor presence & people activity, when you get a bit more space around you, any invasion into the quiet or lack of people presence, becomes much more noticable. Choose your neighbors with great care. You can always fix up a house, upgrade a driveway, etc, you simply cant fix bad neighbors and fences sometimes (even 3 of them) can be of little help.
 

·
Registered
2016 Challenger SRT
Joined
·
3,701 Posts
As for the HOA topic, I understand the need to a point, but some can be way to excessive and akin to big brother watching and controlling everything you do. The bad neighbor situation sounds horrible. That woman sounds like someone the FBI will be sending a swat team in on someday to take her out. That truly sounds like a nightmare so thanks for that perspective that sometimes more land is not necessarily better. Sorry to hear you’re having to deal with that.
 

·
Registered
Boosted 2014 R/T Shaker M6
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
Not to be cliche, but it will truly be easier if you just give in and assimilate now.

Or you can fight and fight and get assimilated later...

The choice is yours, Locutus, err, I mean @Gila Hemi.
I've got time...

10 Best ideas about Cowboys Vs on Pinterest | Dallas cowboys haters memes, Dallas cowboys memes ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
We used to live in the typical packed in neighborhood but built a house in a more rural setting 4 years ago. The smallest lot in our new neighborhood is 1 acre. We are several hundred feet from a neighbor on either side. Even though we liked all our neighbors at our old place it was too close.

People aren't meant to live packed in like sardines and it shows in these neighborhoods. The first thing everyone does is put up a fence to try and create privacy and because you're so close you feel obligated to carry on a conversation every time you go outside. What happens is as people get home they buzz the garage open and shut the door as soon as they pull in.

In a neighborhood with tons of room you tend to be outside way more because you are home working on your home and you have to make it a point to go talk to the neighbors which usually happens as you are walking the dog through the neighborhood since no one puts up a fence when you actually have room and don't feel like you need to "stake out" your property.

We visit our old neighborhood once in a while and always say never again every time we go there. It would be really tough to go back to that after having a bunch of room.
 

·
Premium Member
2014 SRT 8
Joined
·
279 Posts
OP,
more often than not, rural areas &/or properties with acreage have farm animals, rural/industrial activities or people that want to live without rules or consideration for others around them. This is often why people move out of urban areas, so they can be left alone to do - whatever.
We have a house on 3.5 beautifully wooded acreas, as well as another, newer house on 1.75 acres. The neighbor that runs up 1 side of our 3.5 parcel has been a literal nightmare. She's an old nazi (literally, has swatzikas in the trees, on roofs, portraits of hitler on out buildings, hates the entire world mentality) who up and decided to makeshift open an illegal chicken/goat/sheep breeding farm about 2.5 yrs ago. Her unlawful activeties run the gamit from illegal chemical burning, toxic waste dumping, custoemr traffic 24/7, to other things too sick to mention. We are THREE fences deep on the property line (1st is 6ft chain link w/ barbed wire to keep her animals and workers from tresspassing - which was a daily occurrence, second is 8ft. double layer soft sound barrier because, well roosters, sheep & workers are not quiet, final is 8ft cosmetic cedar plank, to hide all the previous from our view) This is all topped with lighting & cams to monitor our property. To say this cost us considerable $$ to do along half of the property line is an understatement.
Every local & state authority is involved, we have two attorneys working on multiple court cases and yet noone can seem to shut her down, because her property size allows for "agricultural activity" and she will comply with enforcement notices for a few weeks, then go right back to her previous behavior. Her effect on the entire surroundog community is absurb.
By contrast, our 1.75 acre house has wonderful , very quiet nieghbors all around, we all look out for each other and any issues that come up can be peacefully worked out. Its non HOA but has a road association, yearly meetings, BBQ, etc. One would thik it would be the opposite, buts its not. The contrast is striking.

I say all this, because more space doesnt always equal more peace or peace of mind. Bigger properties can be alot more work to maintain. When one lives in more urban areas, you also get used to a certain level of neighbor presence & people activity, when you get a bit more space around you, any invasion into the quiet or lack of people presence, becomes much more noticable. Choose your neighbors with great care. You can always fix up a house, upgrade a driveway, etc, you simply cant fix bad neighbors and fences sometimes (even 3 of them) can be of little help.
So DAM spot on !!! U ever want to call me, can tell U tales of shifty neighbors !!! Sorry this is a TRUE issue in the country !!!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top