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Need a better picture to see the source of the leak. Is it coming from the axle seals? Did you happen to hit the seals with the axle shafts when you were installing?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Need a better picture to see the source of the leak. Is it coming from the axle seals? Did you happen to hit the seals with the axle shafts when you were installing?
I think I did bump them with the axle shafts. Would a light bump cause it to leak ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Yep. There is an axle seal saver special tool for those. A shield that goes around it while you slide the axle in.


If you do it without that, you have to be reeeaallly careful. Sh#t happens
I purchased a rear-end (pumpkin only) from a salvage yard a while back and paid a guy to swap it into my Charger, and one of the axle seals leaks. I just figured it was already leaking and just continues now that it’s in my car. But after reading this thread, I’m now wondering if the leak was created at install time.

My scenario differs from the OP’s in a couple different ways:
1) mine is an open diff, not an LSD.
2) mine is not a ZF like the one pictured, it is an old Mercedes unit or whatever they used in the pre-ZF years.

Do either of those matter with respects to the procedure you describe and the special tool you screenshot?
 

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I purchased a rear-end (pumpkin only) from a salvage yard a while back and paid a guy to swap it into my Charger, and one of the axle seals leaks. I just figured it was already leaking and just continues now that it’s in my car. But after reading this thread, I’m now wondering if the leak was created at install time.

My scenario differs from the OP’s in a couple different ways:
1) mine is an open diff, not an LSD.
2) mine is not a ZF like the one pictured, it is an old Mercedes unit or whatever they used in the pre-ZF years.

Do either of those matter with respects to the procedure you describe and the special tool you screenshot?
I don't want to put fingers at anyone, but it's a possibility. It's a different tool for the older style diffs: 9099A, Seal Protector, Differential Output - Mopar Essential Tools and Service Equipment but same thing applies.

Part of the issue is how awkward the angle is on the inner CV joint, if you're installing the diff up into the car with the axles already in the hub bearings. It would be an easy mistake to nick the seal with the splines.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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I don't want to put fingers at anyone, but it's a possibility. It's a different tool for the older style diffs: 9099A, Seal Protector, Differential Output - Mopar Essential Tools and Service Equipment but same thing applies.

Part of the issue is how awkward the angle is on the inner CV joint, if you're installing the diff up into the car with the axles already in the hub bearings. It would be an easy mistake to nick the seal with the splines.
Well, I’ll point the finger, it’s more than entirely possible, it’s highly likely I’d say in this case.

Im not mad or anything. I knew the deal going on. The gentleman I paid to do the swap isn’t a Dodge guy, mine is the first Dodge made this century that he’s worked on. I knew that. But he does have a lift and air tools and such, and he was willing to do the work for a couple honey-huns ($240). So I went with him.

If this is the case, and it sounds like it is, that’s actually good news for me. Now I know what caused my leak and how to prevent it from again. I’ve paid more money in the past for less useful information, that’s a fact.

I’ll take this deal any day!

Many thanks! (y)
 
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It applies to oil seal anywhere in any piece of equipment. As a design engineer, it's something I have to consider every time I specify such things - how the seal is installed, the shape, size, surface finish, chamfer and lead in of the housing and the shaft fitting in it. Usually seals do leak a tiny mist - the seal itself needs lubrication too.
 
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