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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm wondering, are different kinds of snow dangerous to different degrees, or is snow driving just snow driving? That is, is powdery, crystalline snow different from wet-ish snow different from accumulated, packed snow?

Is sleet driving actually more maneuverable? Is ice the worse or not as bad as you might expect?
 

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The closer to freezing temp, the worse it is. Ice and black ice occur. The colder below freezing, the better. My tip for stopping/starting is always pull slightly to the left or right of others tracks, better traction where other tires haven't already polished it before you arrived there.

Oh...and SLOW DOWN, lol.
 
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Powdery type snow won't generally adhere, and if it does, think of it sort of like sand, some traction, but not a lot. Sleet and wet snow will most likely turn to ice or black ice (which you cannot see), and there is no traction...like hydroplaning. That's my experience as a Canadian living in one of the coldest cities in Canada. :)
 

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I'd say ice is the worst of the driving conditions you listed. Sleet to me is more like driving in rain then snow but if there's enough that it's built up between lanes then lane changes can be tricky almost a bit like hydroplaning. Also tricky with sleet or cold weather driving when snow that melted during the day but freezes at night is the fact bridges tend to freeze before other road surfaces so it's a good place to hit black ice.

I completely agree with the sentiment of getting out of another car's tracks to drive on the snow covered ice for more traction. I'm normally driving a 4x4 SUV with AT or MT tires during the winter and my preference is to drive in deeper snows. I'll gladly take 3+ inches of snow over a 1/2" of snow during a storm. The deeper the snow the more resistance and the easier it is to drive on if you've got clearance and the tires for it.

Take it easy
Jay
 

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I think ice is worse then snow, wet snow worse then dry. The biggest thing I can think of is give yourself a big following distance and try to avoid sudden maneuvers. The stability control of these cars are remarkable and make it easy to use as a daily driver.
 

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winter driving

I live in the notorious south Buffalo, N.Y. area. We are used to negotiating the snow/ice and well below freezing temps. First keep a cool head. never panic under whiteout or dicey conditions. Use common sense and stay back away from other vehicles. Get the best set of snow/ice tires you can afford- I have Blizzacks from Bridgestone. Wet heavy snow is the toughest to steer through and maintain a straight line in. Ice whether black or not is always a no win condition so drive slowly and don't make any quick maneuvers. Here in Buffalo if the storm is bad enough the powers to be actually issue a driving ban making it illegal to drive and recommend you stay home. Stay off the break approaching turns, drift into the turn, breaking well ahead of the turn to slow your speed. The anti lock breaking systems in these newer cars makes pumping the break absolete. Just press on the break pedal early and wait for the anti breaking to kick in. Its really more about stopping than going.Most Buffaloanians keep small shovels in their trunks, sand tubes for extra weight over the rear end and for throwing under the tires if you get stuck.
 

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Black Ice conditions are the worst. I always get aggressive out of the driveway first to get a feel of whats on the road.
With good tires..I never had issues with slush or fresh powder snow.
 

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Snow varies greatly by location.

I lived in Northern Ontario, Canada, in the Pacific Northwest, and here in California: snow in the middle section of North America tends to be drier which, in general, makes it easier to get traction despite the amount of snowfall --up to a point, of course. On the other hand, snow near the coasts (or other sufficiently-large bodies of water) tends to be wet, which gets slippery and causes all kinds of trouble, no matter how small the amount.

As others already explained, the closer to freezing point the trickier it is, because snow will melt during the day and turn into ice at night.

Mountainous geography only adds to the challenge as you find yourself constantly trying to get traction going uphill or braking downhill, and navigating through sharp curves.

In winter conditions avoid abrupt changes in speed and direction: go easy on the gas, brakes and steering; maintain safe but steady momentum and distance.
 

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I forgot this in the first post but seeing others mention braking reminded me. I'll try to slow down via gearing as well as my breaks when the conditions are bad. I tend to be in a lower gear than normal and if overdrive can be disabled I'll disable it. I want the car to start slowing when I let off the gas without hitting the brakes. You'll eventually have to hit your brakes but I try to initially slow down via down shifting and let the transmission help me slow the car while going down steep hills in snow and ice. As others have said try to give yourself plenty of room between you and the cars in front of you.

Unfortunately around here Mass-holes on the interstate tend to try to pack their cars right in behind one another so it becomes a challenge to be at a distance you're comfortable with vs. having someone decide to wedge their Prius into that shot. Which results in this... http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/12/01/65-car-pileup-massachusetts-i-290/3797527/ which happened on a stretch of the highway I used to drive everyday.

Take it easy
Jay
 

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rive slow and get blizzacks and maybe weight your trunk down. there are certain things the challenger just can't get through or up.
 

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Interesting you should mention that. It really hasn't been the tail end that has given me cause for concern. It's the front end. My area got a light dusting of powdery snow (probably not more than a 1/4 in), recently. I was at slow speeds leaving the parking lot (but evidently not slow enough for snow). Before I realize my F'up, the car is plowing straight ahead when I want to be turning...and I end up curbing the wheel real good. :(

I had been through a trying instance of sleet, full-on ice, and packed frozen snow before that day, and I handled it pretty good. I thought I had this snow driving thing under control, but not on this day with a pathetic paper-thin layer of snow.
 

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Based on my car getting wrecked 2 weeks ago in ice and snow it's the other driver you should ALWAYS worry about
So very true. When the weather turns, the best decision is to wait out the storm at home because, no matter careful one is, it takes the majority of drivers on the road a week to adjust their driving to winter conditions.
 

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Even here in SoCal, after months of nothing but sunshine, it takes about a week of drizzle and accidents to get everyone on the road to adjust their driving, slow down and keep their distance.
 

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Interesting you should mention that. It really hasn't been the tail end that has given me cause for concern. It's the front end. My area got a light dusting of powdery snow (probably not more than a 1/4 in), recently. I was at slow speeds leaving the parking lot (but evidently not slow enough for snow). Before I realize my F'up, the car is plowing straight ahead when I want to be turning...and I end up curbing the wheel real good. :(

I had been through a trying instance of sleet, full-on ice, and packed frozen snow before that day, and I handled it pretty good. I thought I had this snow driving thing under control, but not on this day with a pathetic paper-thin layer of snow.
You guys with automatics always remember that neutral is your friend for exactly the above reason. Slipping the tranny in neutral stops any forward propulsion from the drive train. Yes that torque converter is still trying to do it's job and drive the car forward even when you have lifted. I ALWAYS keep an eye on my rearview as well while keeping an eye out for an escape route for the idiot driving above his or her skill level behind me. A couple weeks ago I had 2 such idiots who would have rear ended me had I not "rolled" stop signs. The second idiot slid in front of the cop eyeballing me for doing a "hollywood" stop.

Most importantly.............slow down! There will be dry pavement eventually to get your giggles on. I had snow melting off my rears this morning when I backed in the garage! ;)

-7 degrees farenheit.
 

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Keep your Challenger parked in the garage and ride the bus, drive a jeep, drive your neighbors jeep or just simply stay home if you can.

But what ever you do, Don't put your Challenger in harms way. :respect:
 
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