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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, got a 2010 SRT8 with the 6 speed and I'm having some shifting issues, it doesn't always like to go into second gear and nibbles going into several other gears. Previous owner apparently was a little rough on it because it only has 88k miles. So I was thinking the first step is to try and change out the trans fluid. I've been researching what fluid to use, and I've come across SOOO many different people saying this or that and then the next person saying that didn't work for them but this did etc. So now basically I'm just confused as to what to try and put into my car.

I know it's not a great comparison, but my daily driver is a 13' Dart with the 6 speed and previous owner was rough on that too I guess as it was grinding into 3 of the 6 gears all the time. I tried royal purple synchromax and after 1k miles or so it shifts so much better now. So I was thinking about trying that, but although I've found a couple people recommending it, most people recommend Red Line D4. Then I see people recommending MTL, then people recommending a 50/50 mix of MTL and D4 which I thought was odd but was actually thinking about trying that as I won't really be driving this car much at all in the winter. So I wanted to post here and ask some opinions on mixing 50/50 of D4 and MTL, thoughts? Thanks in advance to any replies.
 

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For transmission fluid the fluid the factory recommends should be used. The transmission is designed to work with that fluid.

If the clutch hydraulic fluid system fluid can be flushed/bled (or even just replaced) my advice would be to do that before anything else to see if this alone improves shifting action. The times with other cars (not Dodges) the manual transmission started acting up the problem was not with the transmission fluid but with the clutch hydraulic fluid, which was brake fluid shared with the brake hydraulic system. A flush/bleed first of the braking system followed by a flush/bleed of the clutch hydraulic system worked a minor miracle on how the transmission shifted, and on the clutch action. The fluid was affecting the clutch's enagement which was at the root cause of the transmission shifting issues.

After the fluid flush/bleed there was no need to try different transmission fluids then. Just used the factory fluid and in one case even after 317K miles, with fluid changes on schedule, the manual was shifting with no issues.

If the fluid flush/bleed doesn't help then you can try either the factory fluid -- my preference -- or some other fluid.

Have to point out that if the factory fluid doesn't help the transmission and since the factory fluid works fine in a vast majority of these transmissions the chances are the transmission needs a refresh not some special unicorn fluid.
 

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Replaced my trans fluid sith DRIVEN Brand trans fluid made just for these tremec 6 speeds. I noticed an immediate difference at 40K miles much smoother engagement in all gears. Second gear still wants to fight back though, thats the nature of our transmissions :(
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I will also look into bleeding the clutch hydraulic fluid system as well, never thought of that. Thank you.
However, I have to disagree with you on the factory fluid being the best for it. To many others have changed the fluid and stated they noticed a large difference to have that conclusion. I mean, do you also use mopar brand oil and filter? Air filter? Thats the factory stuff that it was ''designed'' to use, but there are better products out there than factory fill.
 

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Interesting, haven't seen anyone else mention that. Is this the stuff?

Yup, it is. And several people have used it here on the forum. Good fluid is food fluid, i use the driven stuff in my differential and my trans. Great stuff and developed by hemi guys. I definitely recommend it
 

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I will also look into bleeding the clutch hydraulic fluid system as well, never thought of that. Thank you.
However, I have to disagree with you on the factory fluid being the best for it. To many others have changed the fluid and stated they noticed a large difference to have that conclusion. I mean, do you also use mopar brand oil and filter? Air filter? Thats the factory stuff that it was ''designed'' to use, but there are better products out there than factory fill.
There are some who use a different fluid and report a large difference and for the better. Funny no one ever reports a large difference in the other direction. Apparently all alternative fluids are better than the factory fluid.

There is no history with the alternative fluid. The fluid is used. The owner reports how much better the fluid is than the old fluid -- often factory fluid and with some miles on it -- then that's all. Where's the miles of testing? The longevity test results?

Who monitors this alternative fluid to ensure the fluid customer Y uses today is the same fluid has the same chemical makeup as the fluid customer X used months or even years previously?

Used to see/read this with some owners using some turbo diesel oil. Oh how the engine quieted down after filling the engine with this miraculous oil. (That the engine quiets down when the factory oil is used seems to be ignored.) Then that was it. And the rush was on to use this oil. But a few owners who went this route -- bless them -- reported back the engine was once again noisy and in just a few thousand miles.

The factory fluid is what the factory has run in its test mules for hundreds of thousands of miles in all kinds of weather. It is what has been shipped in cars sometimes for years and the factory has feedback from the field how well this fluid does its job. The factory offers a new car warranty that can cover the car for 36K miles (some factories offer a warranty over a greater number of miles, in the case of my Porsche 50K miles) and in some cases can extend this out to 100K miles. If the factory fluid was inadequate transmissions would not make it to 36K miles let alone 100K miles.

I note my used Porsche Turbo with low miles had a lousy shifting manual transmission. Quite a difference from the perfect shifting transmission in my Boxster. I had no experience with Porsche Turbo manual transmissions so I thought it was "normal". 'course, I had the fluid changed but of course used the factory fluid. (The car was under 100K miles CPO warranty.) At some point the transmission developed a leak. Long story short Porsche decided to replace the transmission rather than have a tech repair it.

The new transmission was tons better than the old transmission. Really the difference was night and day. It was clear the problem with the old transmission was not the fluid but that it was just junk. A bad transmission. And the transmission was not abused either. The car when I bought it with less than 10K miles was in pristine condition.

For my cars I use the fluids/filters the factory says to use. For my Hellcat I don't use Mopar oil but Pennzoil 0w-40 which is what the factory says to use. The techs use whatever filter the factory calls for. The same for other fluids and filters.

In the past I have used factory branded/labeled oils in my cars. I drove my '96 Mustang 150K+ miles with no engine issues using a Ford oil (mineral oil too) -- I forget the viscosity something like 5w-30 though IIRC -- changing it or having it changed on Ford's schedule.

More recently my two Porsche cars received oil approved by Porsche. One engine covered 317K miles and other engine 161K miles and neither one manifested any signs of any issues due to oil used or oil filter or air filter used.

My 2018 Mini JCW gets BMW long life 0w-20 (synthetic) oil. That car has a screaming "little" engine 2.0l but which puts out 228hp and 236 ft. lbs. of torque. (If one scaled up the engine to the size of the Hellcat's engine the scaled up Mini engine would put out 706hp and 731 ft. lbs. of torque.) I actually drive the JCW harder than teh Hellcat. It is fast enough to be fun while not so fast as to scare the living daylights out of me. With just under 18K miles the engine is fine but I expect it to be fine for as long as I chose to own the car and even beyond.

That there is some magic fluid on the local auto parts shelf that makes a balky transmission shift as smooth as hot knife through soft butter, that quiets a ticky engine, or in some way works a miracle to address some issue has been around as long as there have been cars and auto parts stores.
 

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There are some who use a different fluid and report a large difference and for the better. Funny no one ever reports a large difference in the other direction. Apparently all alternative fluids are better than the factory fluid.

There is no history with the alternative fluid. The fluid is used. The owner reports how much better the fluid is than the old fluid -- often factory fluid and with some miles on it -- then that's all. Where's the miles of testing? The longevity test results?

Who monitors this alternative fluid to ensure the fluid customer Y uses today is the same fluid has the same chemical makeup as the fluid customer X used months or even years previously?

Used to see/read this with some owners using some turbo diesel oil. Oh how the engine quieted down after filling the engine with this miraculous oil. (That the engine quiets down when the factory oil is used seems to be ignored.) Then that was it. And the rush was on to use this oil. But a few owners who went this route -- bless them -- reported back the engine was once again noisy and in just a few thousand miles.

The factory fluid is what the factory has run in its test mules for hundreds of thousands of miles in all kinds of weather. It is what has been shipped in cars sometimes for years and the factory has feedback from the field how well this fluid does its job. The factory offers a new car warranty that can cover the car for 36K miles (some factories offer a warranty over a greater number of miles, in the case of my Porsche 50K miles) and in some cases can extend this out to 100K miles. If the factory fluid was inadequate transmissions would not make it to 36K miles let alone 100K miles.

I note my used Porsche Turbo with low miles had a lousy shifting manual transmission. Quite a difference from the perfect shifting transmission in my Boxster. I had no experience with Porsche Turbo manual transmissions so I thought it was "normal". 'course, I had the fluid changed but of course used the factory fluid. (The car was under 100K miles CPO warranty.) At some point the transmission developed a leak. Long story short Porsche decided to replace the transmission rather than have a tech repair it.

The new transmission was tons better than the old transmission. Really the difference was night and day. It was clear the problem with the old transmission was not the fluid but that it was just junk. A bad transmission. And the transmission was not abused either. The car when I bought it with less than 10K miles was in pristine condition.

For my cars I use the fluids/filters the factory says to use. For my Hellcat I don't use Mopar oil but Pennzoil 0w-40 which is what the factory says to use. The techs use whatever filter the factory calls for. The same for other fluids and filters.

In the past I have used factory branded/labeled oils in my cars. I drove my '96 Mustang 150K+ miles with no engine issues using a Ford oil (mineral oil too) -- I forget the viscosity something like 5w-30 though IIRC -- changing it or having it changed on Ford's schedule.

More recently my two Porsche cars received oil approved by Porsche. One engine covered 317K miles and other engine 161K miles and neither one manifested any signs of any issues due to oil used or oil filter or air filter used.

My 2018 Mini JCW gets BMW long life 0w-20 (synthetic) oil. That car has a screaming "little" engine 2.0l but which puts out 228hp and 236 ft. lbs. of torque. (If one scaled up the engine to the size of the Hellcat's engine the scaled up Mini engine would put out 706hp and 731 ft. lbs. of torque.) I actually drive the JCW harder than teh Hellcat. It is fast enough to be fun while not so fast as to scare the living daylights out of me. With just under 18K miles the engine is fine but I expect it to be fine for as long as I chose to own the car and even beyond.

That there is some magic fluid on the local auto parts shelf that makes a balky transmission shift as smooth as hot knife through soft butter, that quiets a ticky engine, or in some way works a miracle to address some issue has been around as long as there have been cars and auto parts stores.
There is a standard that any oil has to meet (lets say engine oil) for each specification. They are tested and additives are used to meet OR exceed OEM spec. Im sorry to inform you but you bmw specific oil is more than likely a product of mobile 1 or lubro moli and sold as OEM oil to upcharge.

If you can find something that meets or exceeds the spec, what reason is there not to use it?

I agree with the old adage “if it aint broke, dont fix it” but the fact of the matter is that our transmission do feel broke sometimes. And even if its not technically broken, even Tremec the original manufacturer of our transmissions have developed their OWN fluid in an attempt to fix the notchy nature of their own product. I am a firm believer that if you are replacing anything on your car when the time comes, why not try to replace it with the best you can get your hands on?

Why do you full up 91/93 when most cars only require 89 or 87? Because we usually want the higher octane for hp/mpg.
 

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Tremec now makes their own oil for these transmissions.
TREMEC HP MTF
Product Information
Applications:
Recommended for
motor vehicles with manual gearboxes that require GL4 75W85 MTF, synchromesh,orDEXRON®
III/MERCON®fluids. Not recommended for automatic transmissions or hypoid gear
differentials.
Features & Benefits:Improved load carrying capabilities at all temperatures
Stable viscosity
Prevents reduced film thickness for excellent wear protection at high temperatures
Improves low temperature efficiency, performance, and wear protection
Provides good shift performance at colder temperatures
Compatible with yellow metal, molybdenum, and carbonlined synchronizer materials
Improved dynamic seals performance to helpprevents leaks
Resists corrosion and sludge deposits
 

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There is a standard that any oil has to meet (lets say engine oil) for each specification. They are tested and additives are used to meet OR exceed OEM spec. Im sorry to inform you but you bmw specific oil is more than likely a product of mobile 1 or lubro moli and sold as OEM oil to upcharge.

If you can find something that meets or exceeds the spec, what reason is there not to use it?

I agree with the old adage “if it aint broke, dont fix it” but the fact of the matter is that our transmission do feel broke sometimes. And even if its not technically broken, even Tremec the original manufacturer of our transmissions have developed their OWN fluid in an attempt to fix the notchy nature of their own product. I am a firm believer that if you are replacing anything on your car when the time comes, why not try to replace it with the best you can get your hands on?

Why do you full up 91/93 when most cars only require 89 or 87? Because we usually want the higher octane for hp/mpg.
I'm well aware the BMW oil is probably say Mobil 1 0w-20 rebranded. It might have an additive package the BMW/Mini engine designers came up with to address the special lubrication needs of the very sophisticated Mini variable valve timing and lift hardware or maybe not. And BMW may have an agreement with Mobil 1 that the oil make up is not to change unless BMW oks the proposed changes in writing.

Often boutique oils or just common oils can go through changes to their makeup at the whim of the refiner/bottler. The super duper oil one got a year or two back may not be so super duper the next time he buys the oil.

If there is an up charge it is small. In fact the factory apparently missed its chance to reap obscene profits because the factory only recommends oil changes every 10K miles rather than some fewer number of miles; and the dealer didn't get the memo because even though I had the oil changed at 600, 2K, 5K miles I received a good discount each time. The oil change at 10K miles was free.

Like Porsche and VW I believe BMW has a symbol or a series of letters/numbers that if present on the oil bottle indicates BMW has certified this oil suitable for use in place of its BMW Long Life oil.

Regardless, I use the BMW LL-01 oil because BMW says to use it. Well, since I have my car serviced at the dealer I just have the tech fill it with 5 quarts of BMW LL-01 oil.

In some cases -- Porsche -- what is spec'd in the owners manual is woefully out of date, worse than out of date, just wrong. The only saving grace is the owners manual directs one the dealer for specifics on what oil to use. At the dealer one can ask the service or even the parts department and get a print out a list of a number of oils that Porsche has approved for use. While the factory fill is Mobil 1 0w-40 a number of 0w-40 and 5w-40 and even one 5w-50 oil is approved for use. The only caveat is if the car is used in low temperature (-25C) Porsche says 0w-40 must be used.

For my Hellcat Dodge specifies the engine oil, transmission fluid, diff fluid. Why do I need to bother with trying to find alternatives to these? How do I know what the transmission fluid Dodge recommends has for its ingredients compared to other candidate alternative fluids? MSDS docs used to provide some detail on this but manufacturers are just dialing this back to nothing.

Furthermore, I'm not qualified to make a lubrication engineer's assessment of the info. Just because two bottles of diff lube both claim to be 75w-90 and suitable for diffs with LSD does not mean the two are identical and are interchangeable.

And invariably if one visits the web site of a lubrication company that offers alternative lubricants somewhere in the fine print it says one should use whatever the factory recommends.


BTW, GM is looking for a senior lubrication engineer. Here is what GM is looking for.

Description

Responsible for definition of requirements, execution of design, analysis, development, testing and control of fluids & lubricant-related engineering projects where creativity and initiative are involved as well as some independent judgment. Exercises technical direction over engineering support personnel and may have work direction responsibilities over a small group with specific engineering objectives.

  • Develop lubricant testing methodology, primarily dynamometer test development to discriminate lubricant performance
  • Interpret lubricant test data to predict and diagnose hardware problems
  • Investigate engineering and manufacturing products for compatibility with lubricants and maintain approved products list
  • Interact with lubricant manufacturers and independent test sites (SwRI, Intertec) to prevent and solve field problems
  • Direct internal and external laboratories on lubricant test requirements
  • Support product groups and suppliers to develop and implement appropriate lubricants for future products and markets
  • Generates technical solutions for current, new and major programs
  • Initiates documents to provide engineering authority and to maintain math data
  • Solves engineering related problems
  • Works with engineering functions, suppliers, plant personnel and others to implement cost reduction, methods and product improvements, and to support build programs
  • Plans and implements test and/or development programs
  • Communicates information to and from internal and external customer organizations
  • Coordinates and consults with departments outside engineering, such as manufacturing
  • Travel as required
Qualifications

Basic Required


Dynamometer testing knowledge
Mechanical aptitude on powertrain systems
Basic lubricant and lubrication system knowledge
BS in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry
7-10 years experience in lubricants area

Basic Preferred

Lubricant properties, test methods, and manufacturing processes knowledge
Material Engineering and/or Materials Lab experience
Red X/DFSS certification
MS in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry
15 years experience in lubricants area


Doesn't read like GM (and this could be Dodge or Ford or BMW or any other automaker) is looking for someone who just rubber stamps some oil recommendation based on which oil company offers to kick back the most money to the factory for selecting its oil over other oils.

BTW, I fill up the fuel tank of my cars with the fuel with the grade of octane the automaker recommends. In the case of my Hellcat I fill its tank with 91 as that is what Dodge says to use. With all my cars I have followed what the factory says to use. It has been some years back but when I owned a car that the factory said it was ok to use 87 that is what I used. Except once or twice when I was testing to see if a higher octane of gas would stop the pinging taking off from a stop -- it didn't -- the engine covered 150K (trouble free) miles on 87 octane gasoline.

I would no more use 89 or 87 in the Hellcat because it just so happens some other cars run just fine on 89 or 87 than I would use 90 or 91 or even 93 in a car that is designed for 89 or 87 octane just because some of my cars use the higher octane fuels.
 

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I'm well aware the BMW oil is probably say Mobil 1 0w-20 rebranded. It might have an additive package the BMW/Mini engine designers came up with to address the special lubrication needs of the very sophisticated Mini variable valve timing and lift hardware or maybe not. And BMW may have an agreement with Mobil 1 that the oil make up is not to change unless BMW oks the proposed changes in writing.

Often boutique oils or just common oils can go through changes to their makeup at the whim of the refiner/bottler. The super duper oil one got a year or two back may not be so super duper the next time he buys the oil.

If there is an up charge it is small. In fact the factory apparently missed its chance to reap obscene profits because the factory only recommends oil changes every 10K miles rather than some fewer number of miles; and the dealer didn't get the memo because even though I had the oil changed at 600, 2K, 5K miles I received a good discount each time. The oil change at 10K miles was free.

Like Porsche and VW I believe BMW has a symbol or a series of letters/numbers that if present on the oil bottle indicates BMW has certified this oil suitable for use in place of its BMW Long Life oil.

Regardless, I use the BMW LL-01 oil because BMW says to use it. Well, since I have my car serviced at the dealer I just have the tech fill it with 5 quarts of BMW LL-01 oil.

In some cases -- Porsche -- what is spec'd in the owners manual is woefully out of date, worse than out of date, just wrong. The only saving grace is the owners manual directs one the dealer for specifics on what oil to use. At the dealer one can ask the service or even the parts department and get a print out a list of a number of oils that Porsche has approved for use. While the factory fill is Mobil 1 0w-40 a number of 0w-40 and 5w-40 and even one 5w-50 oil is approved for use. The only caveat is if the car is used in low temperature (-25C) Porsche says 0w-40 must be used.

For my Hellcat Dodge specifies the engine oil, transmission fluid, diff fluid. Why do I need to bother with trying to find alternatives to these? How do I know what the transmission fluid Dodge recommends has for its ingredients compared to other candidate alternative fluids? MSDS docs used to provide some detail on this but manufacturers are just dialing this back to nothing.

Furthermore, I'm not qualified to make a lubrication engineer's assessment of the info. Just because two bottles of diff lube both claim to be 75w-90 and suitable for diffs with LSD does not mean the two are identical and are interchangeable.

And invariably if one visits the web site of a lubrication company that offers alternative lubricants somewhere in the fine print it says one should use whatever the factory recommends.


BTW, GM is looking for a senior lubrication engineer. Here is what GM is looking for.

Description

Responsible for definition of requirements, execution of design, analysis, development, testing and control of fluids & lubricant-related engineering projects where creativity and initiative are involved as well as some independent judgment. Exercises technical direction over engineering support personnel and may have work direction responsibilities over a small group with specific engineering objectives.

  • Develop lubricant testing methodology, primarily dynamometer test development to discriminate lubricant performance
  • Interpret lubricant test data to predict and diagnose hardware problems
  • Investigate engineering and manufacturing products for compatibility with lubricants and maintain approved products list
  • Interact with lubricant manufacturers and independent test sites (SwRI, Intertec) to prevent and solve field problems
  • Direct internal and external laboratories on lubricant test requirements
  • Support product groups and suppliers to develop and implement appropriate lubricants for future products and markets
  • Generates technical solutions for current, new and major programs
  • Initiates documents to provide engineering authority and to maintain math data
  • Solves engineering related problems
  • Works with engineering functions, suppliers, plant personnel and others to implement cost reduction, methods and product improvements, and to support build programs
  • Plans and implements test and/or development programs
  • Communicates information to and from internal and external customer organizations
  • Coordinates and consults with departments outside engineering, such as manufacturing
  • Travel as required
Qualifications

Basic Required


Dynamometer testing knowledge
Mechanical aptitude on powertrain systems
Basic lubricant and lubrication system knowledge
BS in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry
7-10 years experience in lubricants area

Basic Preferred

Lubricant properties, test methods, and manufacturing processes knowledge
Material Engineering and/or Materials Lab experience
Red X/DFSS certification
MS in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry
15 years experience in lubricants area


Doesn't read like GM (and this could be Dodge or Ford or BMW or any other automaker) is looking for someone who just rubber stamps some oil recommendation based on which oil company offers to kick back the most money to the factory for selecting its oil over other oils.

BTW, I fill up the fuel tank of my cars with the fuel with the grade of octane the automaker recommends. In the case of my Hellcat I fill its tank with 91 as that is what Dodge says to use. With all my cars I have followed what the factory says to use. It has been some years back but when I owned a car that the factory said it was ok to use 87 that is what I used. Except once or twice when I was testing to see if a higher octane of gas would stop the pinging taking off from a stop -- it didn't -- the engine covered 150K (trouble free) miles on 87 octane gasoline.

I would no more use 89 or 87 in the Hellcat because it just so happens some other cars run just fine on 89 or 87 than I would use 90 or 91 or even 93 in a car that is designed for 89 or 87 octane just because some of my cars use the higher octane fuels.
Wow thats a lot of info, and I am no oil engineer but....

To each his own i guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So I decided to go with Royal Purple Synchromax because it helped the transmission in my dart so much. I changed it out yesterday and noticed an immediate difference. I shifts SO much smoother now, with nearly no ''nibbling'' between gears anymore. However, whenever I speed/power shift, sometimes it doesn't like going into 2nd or 3rd. So, I'm having my brake fluid flushed out and hoping that it's the clutch slave/master causing this which seems like a good possibility. I will report back once thats done, but again royal purple synchromax seems to have done wonders to the driveability so far. It completely took away the hard knotchy feel and its so much smoother now. With time the transmission in my dart only got smoother and smoother, so I'll be happy to report back after like 1k miles or something whether or not it got even better.
 

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So I decided to go with Royal Purple Synchromax because it helped the transmission in my dart so much. I changed it out yesterday and noticed an immediate difference. I shifts SO much smoother now, with nearly no ''nibbling'' between gears anymore. However, whenever I speed/power shift, sometimes it doesn't like going into 2nd or 3rd. So, I'm having my brake fluid flushed out and hoping that it's the clutch slave/master causing this which seems like a good possibility. I will report back once thats done, but again royal purple synchromax seems to have done wonders to the driveability so far. It completely took away the hard knotchy feel and its so much smoother now. With time the transmission in my dart only got smoother and smoother, so I'll be happy to report back after like 1k miles or something whether or not it got even better.
I'm no expert, but are you sure that's not just the skip shift kicking in that's preventing you from going into 2nd or 3rd? Kinda sounds like it to me
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I'm no expert, but are you sure that's not just the skip shift kicking in that's preventing you from going into 2nd or 3rd? Kinda sounds like it to me
Didn't know there was such a thing. It sounds like that is what it is, but doesn't make sense as it really only does it whenever I speed shift. Regardless, I just bought the skip shift eliminator since they are cheap. But, I don't think its a waste of money getting the brake fluid flushed and lines bled, it looked pretty dirty.
 

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Didn't know there was such a thing. It sounds like that is what it is, but doesn't make sense as it really only does it whenever I speed shift. Regardless, I just bought the skip shift eliminator since they are cheap. But, I don't think its a waste of money getting the brake fluid flushed and lines bled, it looked pretty dirty.
It only kicks in when certain criteria are met, like specific speed/RPMs. You're probably triggering it when you are messing around with speed shifting. Hopefully the skip shift eliminator fixes it for you, seems like a stupid "feature." I've got an order placed and I'm waiting for my car to come in, and just reading up on it has me thinking about buying an eliminator, but apparently driving in sport mode shuts skip shift off on 2018+. I think I'll wait and see what the issue is like first
 

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"The factory fluid is what the factory has run in its test mules for hundreds of thousands of miles in all kinds of weather."

I don't see how. Mopar, Chevy and Ford do not make the TR-6060 Tremec transmissions that go in these cars. The auto makers use "their" brand of trans fluid to make it simple. These transmissions were developed with DEXRON III for it's friction characteristics. This info comes directly from TREMEC. That's why after so much confusion, TREMEC started making their own trans fluid. I have a case of it waiting to go in R/T when it gets 2500 miles or so.
 
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