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Hi all I have couple pads and cloths that I've used. How should I clean them? Or shouldn't I worry about cleaning them, and throw them away after each use?
 

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Microfiber cloths/towels - machine wash - hot, mild detergent, NO FABRIC SOFTENER - tumble dry. Easy peasy.

I'd go with a multi-cycle hand wash & some Dawn with the applicators.

Probably pays to wash soon after use as well (rather than waiting).
 

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Hi all I have couple pads and cloths that I've used. How should I clean them? Or shouldn't I worry about cleaning them, and throw them away after each use?
....I agree with avconsumer2.

I never toss my MF towels after use (I wash them) but as far as applicators (MF or otherwise), it depends on the quality of the media and the task it’s used for.
....I sometimes even hand wash those.

In either case, when caring for microfiber products it is important to note that you shouldn’t use bleach, softener, dryer sheets or mix with other towels/laundry. That is pretty standard advice from most manufacturers. Also, you should try to use detergents that are free rinsing. …..or at least run them through a 2nd (or multiple) rinses to make sure whatever soap/cleaner you use is thoroughly flushed from the fabric.

Personally, I sort my towels by task. In other words, I don’t use towels on my paint that I use on the interior, wheels, jambs, etc. This is mainly to avoid cross-contamination but also because the types of towels I use on my paint are typically of better quality and cost quite a bit more than ones (for example) I use on my wheels. The same holds true for my wash loads. I typically wash my window and paint towels separately from my “mutli-task” ones. …..and possibly a third load for grimy articles.

For soiled towels I might presoak them in a bucket with an APC solution prior to being placed in the washer or do the presoak (with the APC) in the machine. ….running it through two or more cycles (using my regular choice of detergent on the last). In most cases however, I will typically use a microfiber detergent (MicroRestore) with either hot or warm water and then dry on low. ….MF’s typically don’t need to be left in the dryer for long since they dry up relatively quick.

…..please note that MF-specific detergents are not a “must”. I use them however because they work for me as an effective, free-rinsing solution. There are a lot of folks who use liquid laundry detergents (avoiding products with dyes and such) or even dish cleaners like Dawn. ….the only problem with products like the latter is that you may need to rinse several times to make sure the detergent is removed from your towels.
 

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The best and safest way to clean microfiber towels is to use Woolite cold wash and then let them air dry. They come out good as new!
 

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I am with Kean. I prefer mf specific since they tend to be better clean rinsing. I used Wooloute He but several brands (CG, DP, Microrestore) seemed to work more consistently.

If something is really bad, I pre-soak in an APC like Optimum Power Clean.
 

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The best and safest way to clean microfiber towels is to use Woolite cold wash and then let them air dry. They come out good as new!
....not trying to be argumentative (hope its not taken that way), but I have towels that a several years old and still in excellent condition so I would propose that "best and safe" are relative descriptions of what you have found works well for you.


If you’re reasoning comes from a “no heat is better” viewpoint, I would point out that MF towels are made up of polyester and polyamide fibers (border material can vary). Both have melting points well above that which your wash water or a properly functioning dryer can achieve (upwards of 400 F IIRC). In fact, I have seen some examples (of towels purchased by fellow members on detailing websites) where the manufacturer actually recommended boiling their towels prior to use.

I’ve followed a few heated discussions on the subject (no pun intended ;)) over the years between enthusiasts, professional detailers, vendors and even textile experts on various detailing forums. With what I gathered from my own experiences doing many loads and the experience of others mentioned above, I am confident (odd issues aside) that there is no harm in at least washing on warm and drying on a low setting. ….and in my case, hang drying is out of the question because 1) the sheer number of towels I typically wash in a load, and 2) I don’t like the idea of leaving my towels exposed in the open while they dry (risk of contamination landing on them).
 

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Awesome! Thanks guys, problem solved!
 
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