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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I’m looking for Mopar Antifreeze / Coolant 10 Year / 150,000 Mile 50/50 Prediluted.
Where in my city would I be able to find this. I’m from San Diego, CA the huge retail auto stores don’t sell it. Would the dealership have this? I know I could buy it online but I want to buy it in person so I could put it in today. I am running really low.
 

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Make sure you get the right one. Different year Challengers use different antifreezes.
 

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Make sure you get the right one. Different year Challengers use different antifreezes.
True.

Model Year 2013 was the first year for the new OAT 10 year coolant as posted above.

All cars Model Year 2012 and older used the HOAT coolant of which Zerex G-05 can be used as a suitable replacement.

For the newer cars I would only use the Mopar coolant.

68163848AB straight concentrate
68163849AB pre-mixed 50/50


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Is the coolant level low? If so there's a leak. After you get the jug of anti-freeze you need to have the leak found and addressed.


The problem is the leak means the system is probably not pressure tight and without the ability to hold pressure this can result in the hot coolant flashing to steam at the hottest areas. This steam can form an insulating bubble of steam around a hot spot that prevents further contact by liquid coolant. Localized overheating will occur and this can result in damage to the head.


You should not drive around with a cooling system that has a leak.



Oh, in a pinch with low coolant level you don't need to add anti-freeze but just distilled water. While this will affect the water to anti-freeze ratio unless you live at the North Pole there's no risk of the coolant freezing. And when you get the car in and have the source of the leak found and addressed you can have the coolant replaced and the tech will then refill the system with a fresh mix of coolant with the proper anti-freeze to water ratio.
 

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also - the 10 year purple OAT coolant will tend to "fade" to a pink color within year or so time.

You'll see a the example with Hellcats the I/C tank will still be purple and the main coolant tank will not be purple color coolant...there's two separate coolant circuits on the 'Cats
 

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also - the 10 year purple OAT coolant will tend to "fade" to a pink color within year or so time.

You'll see a the example with Hellcats the I/C tank will still be purple and the main coolant tank will not be purple color coolant...there's two separate coolant circuits on the 'Cats
Haha, I saved this pic of a Redeye that just got in, it had been sitting so long it almost looks like the intercooler tank coolant is already turning pink.


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My R/T is a 2013....I only have a little over 19000 miles on it right now....but since the car is almost 6 years old should I get the flush done? No leaks or anything and the temp is always fine...just asking.
 

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My R/T is a 2013....I only have a little over 19000 miles on it right now....but since the car is almost 6 years old should I get the flush done? No leaks or anything and the temp is always fine...just asking.
You should flush your radiator and add new coolant every 5 years/150,000 miles. It's important to maintain maximum protection of your engine's aluminum components.
 

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You should flush your radiator and add new coolant every 5 years/150,000 miles. It's important to maintain maximum protection of your engine's aluminum components.

It is more than maintaining protection (against corrosion) of the engine's aluminum components, it is helping to prevent corrosion of anything that is in contact with the coolant regardless if it is aluminum, iron, or some kind of pliable rubber like material. The radiators, heater core, heads, block, and the gaskets that separate the head and block, the hoses, and the water pump seals.


With my previous cars one I owned 16 years I had the coolant replaced every 4 to 5 years and the only cooling system issue I had with the car was the water pump bearing got noisy at around 172K miles. The water pump bearing got noisy because it wore out. The radiators, heater core, coolant/oil heat exchanger, the hoses, everything else, in the cooling system was original. Oh, wait. The plastic coolant reservoir tank failed (some time after the water pump) but it was not due to the coolant but simply a known mode of failure. The tank would develop a split along the bottom of the tank that followed the mold seam and from this split would leak coolant if the coolant got hot enough and developed enough pressure. I guess this mold seam was a weak point and the repeated expansion/contraction of the tank over uncounted engine warm up cycles caused the tank to fail.
 

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The plastic coolant reservoir tank failed (some time after the water pump) but it was not due to the coolant but simply a known mode of failure. The tank would develop a split along the bottom of the tank that followed the mold seam and from this split would leak coolant if the coolant got hot enough and developed enough pressure. I guess this mold seam was a weak point and the repeated expansion/contraction of the tank over uncounted engine warm up cycles caused the tank to fail.
The materials spec'd by manufacturers come into play.

An independent shop back in Portland - the owner owns both Mercedes and BMWs.

His comment was own a BWM long enough and every plastic cooling system part will fail. He mentions that although Mercedes uses the same suppliers, their spec for components were different.

Outside of the early 80s models that would have plastic radiator necks give out, their cooling system components have far better durability.

His words and experience on models ranging from 70s up through 2Ks
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Is the coolant level low? If so there's a leak. After you get the jug of anti-freeze you need to have the leak found and addressed.


The problem is the leak means the system is probably not pressure tight and without the ability to hold pressure this can result in the hot coolant flashing to steam at the hottest areas. This steam can form an insulating bubble of steam around a hot spot that prevents further contact by liquid coolant. Localized overheating will occur and this can result in damage to the head.


You should not drive around with a cooling system that has a leak.



Oh, in a pinch with low coolant level you don't need to add anti-freeze but just distilled water. While this will affect the water to anti-freeze ratio unless you live at the North Pole there's no risk of the coolant freezing. And when you get the car in and have the source of the leak found and addressed you can have the coolant replaced and the tech will then refill the system with a fresh mix of coolant with the proper anti-freeze to water ratio.
It doesn’t indicate it’s low. But I opened up the hood before turning the car on one morning and I seen it was really low. But when I turn it on it rises? I believe it’s low because I was changing the thermostat for a 180. In the process I lost a lot of coolant.
 

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It doesn’t indicate it’s low. But I opened up the hood before turning the car on one morning and I seen it was really low. But when I turn it on it rises? I believe it’s low because I was changing the thermostat for a 180. In the process I lost a lot of coolant.
That's correct - liquid expands with temperatures, which is why you'll sell full cold / full hot levels in the reservoir
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It doesn’t indicate it’s low. But I opened up the hood before turning the car on one morning and I seen it was really low. But when I turn it on it rises? I believe it’s low because I was changing the thermostat for a 180. In the process I lost a lot of coolant.
That's correct - liquid expands with temperatures, which is why you'll sell full cold / full hot levels in the reservoir
If it looks low when cool and high when hot then do I need to add more coolant?
 

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It doesn’t indicate it’s low. But I opened up the hood before turning the car on one morning and I seen it was really low. But when I turn it on it rises? I believe it’s low because I was changing the thermostat for a 180. In the process I lost a lot of coolant.
That's correct - liquid expands with temperatures, which is why you'll sell full cold / full hot levels in the reservoir
If it looks low when cool and high when hot then do I need to add more coolant?
Check where the level is when cold on the coolant tank's level gage.

Anywhere in the "cold zone" is acceptable.
 

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You should flush your radiator and add new coolant every 5 years/150,000 miles. It's important to maintain maximum protection of your engine's aluminum components.
Why is the OEM OAT coolant marketed as 10 yr / 150,000 miles then?

Additionally.....Peak offers coolant in OAT called Final Charge, if one needs some on a day when the dealership is closed or is far away. This coolant was discovered early on by a few guys over on cumminsforum.com in RAM Cummins applications.

https://www.peakhd.com/product/final-charge/oat-extended-life-coolant-antifreeze/

 
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