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Discussion Starter #1
I'll preface this by saying I've lived in Michigan all my life, and have driven through some bad winters over the years. At this point having a Winter car isn't an option for me(Hopefully I can swing it next year) so I have my new to me 09 RT with a 5.7 6M for my daily driver.

We had a good bit of the slippery stuff yesterday, and I have to say even on all season's (Nitto Motivo 245s front 255s rear) I had no issues getting good traction. It must be the weight of the car as well as the limited slip rear that help drive through some deep snow. I also wonder if the manual transmission made a difference as I had complete control over how much power was going to the rear wheels. Everyone at work has been asking me all morning how the drive home was for me yesterday as if they want to hear that it was rough.

My first car was a 76 Ford Torino which was about as heavy as my Challenger but had an open differential. Drove that car year round with some bad winters for 6 years before passing it down to my brother. So I guess my point is if you know how to drive in the snow it doesn't matter if you have FWD, RWD or AWD. Today's tire technology is some pretty good stuff
 

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Good to hear you’re doing well in it but don’t ever get over confident. When you get complacent you get caught off guard and games over. Four snow tires are far better than your all seasons. Have a safe winter season.
 

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Good to hear you’re doing well in it but don’t ever get over confident. When you get complacent you get caught off guard and games over. Four snow tires are far better than your all seasons. Have a safe winter season.
Amen.
 

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Snow driving has more to do with conditions and the driver than the equipment.

Either you can drive or you can't.

But you guys are right that you should not get complacent or ****y. It will catch you off guard if you let it!
 

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Snow driving has more to do with conditions and the driver than the equipment.

Either you can drive or you can't.

But you guys are right that you should not get complacent or ****y. It will catch you off guard if you let it!
EVERYONE thinks they can drive but truth is usually they are just all talk. Who will be here and say they’re just average or decent? Too many editions of fast and furious and video games makes them racing and drifting experts. Just getting from point A to point B in one piece doesn’t count, often times it’s other drivers ability to avoid you that counts more.
When I was young I did some far from smart moves at some incredibly high speeds and thank god I'm still here. Looking back I’m thinking maybe that was my winning the lottery? I have friends who sadly aren’t with us anymore.
As they say wisdom comes with age, it makes you appreciate that every day above ground is a great day.
Just my $.02.
 

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. . . So I guess my point is if you know how to drive in the snow it doesn't matter if you have FWD, RWD or AWD. . .
I agree and loved driving my '09 R/T in the snow. It was more fun than the Jeep I have now. I had four snow tires on the Challenger though. I had no problem on any snow-covered road up to about 8" (which at that depth my car became the plow of sorts).
 

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My screen name is pretty old. I’m 40. Been driving in snow a couple of years now.

There are times when conditions or other drivers make your skills a moot point, as well as your equipment (tires, awd, etc).

We had some weird freezing fog last year. It was a surprise weather event. Roads looked wet, but were solid black ice for miles. Just letting off the brake quickly would result in wheelspin and sliding sideways in my truck. No fun at all, but my 2wd truck did things 4wd trucks and fwd/awd cars couldn’t do because the drivers didn’t know how.

That being said, if I had not been caught out in it as a surprise, I would have stayed in place until it cleared.
 

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Well made it through the snow storms of the 70's in Chicago. Rear drive car, nylon bias tires. No snow tires. Light car. It can be done. It was done every day. Horrendous traffic jams!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Everyone's comments are very valid, and I'm sure that snow tires would be better however at about 1400 bucks for my car for a set I would have used that kind of cash on a winter beater if I had it to spare.

Sucks being a poor working man...

While it is important to drive properly in the winter time, it is equally if not more important to practice defensive driving. Being fully aware of everyone around you, and anticipating if someone driving nearby is about to get themselves into trouble and having a way to avoid them is key. I rode a motorcycle when I was younger, and that has me on high alert for reading the other traffic even when I am in my car.

Have a safe weekend everyone
 

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Born and raised in Buffalo NY and all my driving years (26 of them) in real snow. Having a 6 speed manual is a definite help for winter driving. You can always start in 2nd or even 3rd gear to gain traction with little to no wheel spin. Narrow snow tires are also a big plus (at least on the rear). The traction and stability control on these cars are really good also. Front wheel drive has a definite traction advantage in a straight line over rear wheel drive but I'm not a fan of FWD in turns. To much throttle and the front end wants to push out. I've always preferred RWD in turns as I feel more in control with the back end sliding around. For me though, when the going gets to tuff out comes the Ram 2500 4x4. Absolutely nothing will beat a 4 wheel drive with allot of ground clearance and grippy tires in the snow!
 

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Everyone's comments are very valid, and I'm sure that snow tires would be better however at about 1400 bucks for my car for a set I would have used that kind of cash on a winter beater if I had it to spare.

Sucks being a poor working man...

While it is important to drive properly in the winter time, it is equally if not more important to practice defensive driving. Being fully aware of everyone around you, and anticipating if someone driving nearby is about to get themselves into trouble and having a way to avoid them is key. I rode a motorcycle when I was younger, and that has me on high alert for reading the other traffic even when I am in my car.

Have a safe weekend everyone
Being a poor working man gives you goals and an appreciation for hard work. You’ll get there and it’s well worth the journey. I started with nothing and have an early fully paid for house and own six cars and other toys. Looking back I wondered where I’d end up and can say I never thought I be where I am now. You can do it too.
 

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How is it the 1st big snowfall of 2018?
 

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Drove for 40 years in the winter snow. 383 Roadrunner, 440 Charger and used a pair of bias "winter tires" on the rear. Made it around fine and there was always someone willing to help push you out when needed. I now have the luxury of a Ram 1500 4X4 with winter tires and there is pretty much nothing that can stop me. Is there better options than a high horsepower rear wheel drive - you bet, but anyone who thinks it can't be done should move somewhere it doesn't snow.

My main reason for not wanting to drive my car is all the other dumba!! drivers - worried about someone with their SUV figuring AWD lets you stop faster too.
 
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