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After hitting 6 dealers in my area car shopping in the last month I can tell you that 90% of car salesmen deserve their reputations and are lying, cheating, low life scum. I bought my car from the nice ones who fall into the 10%, who still tried screwing me here and there. One dealer kept telling me there were no repates on Challengers even though on the Dodge web site is showed $3500 worth.

What I noticed is that what they all do is try to get you fixated on a monthly payment. Instead of saying the car costs $x, your loan APR is x%, and the loan length is x months... they say "you can have this car for only $200/month".

I think most buyers have a comfort zone. They know they need a car, they know they can afford $x/month, so they just feel safe paying that amount and getting a car. Of course what they don't realize is that they are paying a high purchase price to begin with, and getting a 25% APR loan over 8 years.

And the dealer add ons. They tried to hit me with:
$795 flashing rear tail light
$1395 clear coat on paint to proctect from the sun
$500 vin etched in windows
$999 doc fee

If anyone is that stupid to pay those things they shouldn't be car shopping in the first place.
 

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The guy that I dealt with at Baxter in Omaha was a straight shooter. In fact, he hadn't realized that 20" chrome clad wheels were on my car from a trade they did for another buyer that wanted 18" wheels. Instead of trying to charge me $1,350 for the wheels, they ate it. They also threw in a spare tire kit at my request. I was very pleased.

There's nothing I hate more than a lying salesman, or a lying customer for that matter (I'm in sales). I won't deal with crooks.
 

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I was lucky to have an excellent buying experience and a good Internet sales manager to work with when I bought my Challenger. All the negotiating was done over email and phone, no tricks cheats or lies, I got what I wanted for my trade in, and what I wanted for the price of the Challenger, and when I went down to sign they had keys in my hand and me out the door in an hour.
 

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You are 100% correct and financing through a dealer is the biggest mistake a person can make. The actual APR and total cost of the car is stratospheric but they focus people on the monthly payment. The lead question is "how much can you afford monthly" or the victim serves that number up first. Then they just string out the term of the loan and the APR as far as necessary to get that payment where it needs to be to do a sale. Then, at closing, you get shuffled into a back room and they try to pressure sell you everything you mentioned, plus don't forget the $500 tire road hazard fee. The highest doc. fee I have ever heard of is $500. One thousand dollars or any fee at all is criminal. When I buy a car I tell them up front that I refuse to pay a fee and I never have; not once. It's just another means of skimming the customer. Just think of how many gullible, naive people fall for these tactics every time.
 

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Have owned 4 new Mopars in my life. Never ever had any problems with the financing (like being over charged). Always got a good deal and my Challenger buying experience was very smooth. They didn't even try to upsale anything (service contract, etc). Took adventage of Chrysler's 1.9% financing.
 

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Me too, I paid MSRP with 1.9%. None of that other add on BS. I wish i could have got 7 or 8k off like there offering now, but ive had it for 11 months and thats worth the diffrence to me.
 

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My experience is the same, the sales people always concentrate on monthly payment and try to add on stuff when you go to sign the papers.

The local KIA dealer here even increases their prices when the national office puts on a rebate or incentive so that the price ends up being the same. They tried telling a buddy of mine that a four door blue forte was a rare car and would be collectable...:notallthere:

The best advice is to do your research first and know the options, prices, etc...
 

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Stories like this are why I'm going to have a pre-approved loan from my bank prior to shopping for my 2011 Challenger. I live in a major city (San Antonio) so I can shop at many dealerships. One bit of BS and I'm off to the next one. This vehicle is a "want" vehicle, not a "need" one, so I have lots of time to get a good deal.:guiness:
 

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Stories like this are why I'm going to have a pre-approved loan from my bank prior to shopping for my 2011 Challenger. I live in a major city (San Antonio) so I can shop at many dealerships. One bit of BS and I'm off to the next one. This vehicle is a "want" vehicle, not a "need" one, so I have lots of time to get a good deal.:guiness:
This is the way to go. I've purchased probably 10 cars in my life from various dealers. The last three were done with essentially a bank draft in my back pocket.

The salesman don't have near as much game when you start talking price instead of payments.

Figure out what payments you can afford with your credit union or bank. They have your financial interests in mind (at least moreso than the salesman).

Don't let the salesman tell you what you can afford.
 

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Well, isn't it better sometimes to get the deals they offer - like 0% APR and etc? Your bank won't give you that, correct?
 

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Well, isn't it better sometimes to get the deals they offer - like 0% APR and etc? Your bank won't give you that, correct?
I think if you can get 1.9% it may be worth it--you still should compare the amortization schedules of whatever loan the bank/credit union qualifies you for.

If you can get 0%, then I think go for it, you can always refinance when the 0% runs out. But still, don't get suckered on the total price, because if you pay a premium, you may not be able to refinance w/o a down payment to bring the loan note value down to match the then-current value after depreciation. This has hit many car buyers in years past--they think "0%, great!", pay an extra grand or two that the salesman says they have to to get the 0% rate, then when the 0% period expires and the rate goes up to 10% they try to refinance, but they find out that they still owe $x when it's now only worth $y, and x > y--so they have trouble refinancing and end up stuck w/the higher rate.
 

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You are 100% correct and financing through a dealer is the biggest mistake a person can make.
….I disagree. The biggest mistake is when you go into a dealer with no financing and let them use that as a negotiating tool. If the dealer can offer you a better rate than your current lender, there’s no reason you shouldn’t take advantage of that.


With my last few cars, I chose to only correspond with the internet/fleet mgrs via e-mail until we settled on a price for a particular vehicle. I am very clear in my initial messages I send to the dealers and I let them know that I won’t play games. The first dealer willing to meet my needs and who proves to be a straight-shooter will earn my business. I have them include all fees (advertising, delivery, admin, tax/license, etc.) so there are no surprises. Here in CA the admin fees are capped and I am also able to figure out the tax & license myself so I will know if something is not right in their quote.

Having said that, before I even contact a dealer I (first) thoroughly research the vehicle, options, etc. so I know exactly what I want. If that includes taking a trip to a dealer for a hands-on look or test drive, then I do that as well. …..I simply don’t make any commitments with any salesmen I might interact with. I also seek out my own financing if needed (usually through my credit union) and research the value of my trade-in when applicable. ….sometimes negotiating that price via e-mail as well when it comes time to corresponding.

When I have negotiated the price of the car and possibly the price of my trade-in, I am finally ready to go into the dealership. The only thing I need to worry about at that point is inspecting the car, taking it for a test drive and signing the ppwk. If the salesman deviates from the deal he/she made with me in our correspondence, I will walk. ….although I never had to. As far as financing, I now hold the upper hand since I already have my own. If the salesman can beat the rate I have, I will usually go with their company. With my Challenger, they had 1.9% financing at the time so it was a no-brainer. Signing the ppwk can be a task in itself when dealing with that aspect of the dealership. However, (IMO) the hardest part is already over and it is as simple as saying “no” to any additional services, warranties, products, etc. you don’t want.

IMO/IME it all boils down to leverage. The key is to put that power into your hands instead of the dealers. The more control you have over your situation, the less stressful/confusing your buying experience will be. ….gaining knowledge through research is a big part of this and what I do when buying any large ticket item (whether it’s a car or not).
 

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After hitting 6 dealers in my area car shopping in the last month I can tell you that 90% of car salesmen deserve their reputations and are lying, cheating, low life scum. They tried to hit me with:
$500 vin etched in windows.
Window etching is good security protection for your car- but $500? :yikes:

I did all 6 of my windows with a a kit from VinGuard for only $29.99. Very easy to do. Took only about 30 minutes.



Order VINGUARD now!
 

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I was lucky to have an excellent buying experience and a good Internet sales manager to work with when I bought my Challenger. All the negotiating was done over email and phone, no tricks cheats or lies, I got what I wanted for my trade in, and what I wanted for the price of the Challenger, and when I went down to sign they had keys in my hand and me out the door in an hour.
Sounds about like my experience. It went pretty well, no extra add-on BS. I paid more than I would have cared to, but I was very very specific in the car I wanted and was lucky to find one on the lot that was exactly equipped with everything I would have ordered from the factory. I searched very thoroughly for 3 weeks beforehand and was satisfied that it was the only one within 300 miles that had exactly what I wanted.

I'm glad Secret City Dodge was easy to work with on everything else. I know I would have been very upset to have to pass on my dream car because I knew someone was trying to rip me off.
 

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If you can get 0%, then I think go for it, you can always refinance when the 0% runs out. But still, don't get suckered on the total price, because if you pay a premium, you may not be able to refinance w/o a down payment to bring the loan note value down to match the then-current value after depreciation. This has hit many car buyers in years past--they think "0%, great!", pay an extra grand or two that the salesman says they have to to get the 0% rate, then when the 0% period expires and the rate goes up to 10% they try to refinance, but they find out that they still owe $x when it's now only worth $y, and x > y--so they have trouble refinancing and end up stuck w/the higher rate.
I have never heard of a 0% period. I got 0% on the wifes Grand Caravan and it's for the life of the loan. What are you referring to, like a ARM house loan? Please explain this one to me. Thanks.:scratchhead:
 

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I have never heard of a 0% period. I got 0% on the wifes Grand Caravan and it's for the life of the loan. What are you referring to, like a ARM house loan? Please explain this one to me. Thanks.:scratchhead:

I was wondering the same thing. I've never had a limited term 0% interest loan with a time that it bumps up... That doesn't make any sense to me.

Mike
 

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Stories like this are why I'm going to have a pre-approved loan from my bank prior to shopping for my 2011 Challenger. I live in a major city (San Antonio) so I can shop at many dealerships. One bit of BS and I'm off to the next one. This vehicle is a "want" vehicle, not a "need" one, so I have lots of time to get a good deal.:guiness:
If you have any questions, give me a PM. I'm in SA with my 2010.
 

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Well, isn't it better sometimes to get the deals they offer - like 0% APR and etc? Your bank won't give you that, correct?
Know your credit score. They will NEVER quote you the interest rate you qualify for. Those points (even in 10ths) add up for them. The dealers are going to the same bank you use, receiving HUGE discounts because of the volume of sales they throw their way plus incentives PLUS factory kick-ins. Act indifferent to their pitches and know when to walk. Most will pull last minute (finance office) crap so prepare yourself.
 

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If you research what you want in car and have approved finacing in place there should never be a issue in purchasing a car.
Dealerships hate it when you know more then they do about their product.
If your the type who might be convinced to purchase unnecessary options or items write a list of how you want the car to be and stick to it.
If you start to feel pressured go for a walk on your own and think about it away from the salesman.
If your gut feeling says bail then get outta there. lol
 
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