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Discussion Starter #1
I installed a Magnacharger 6lb kit a couple of months back in a 2009 RT . I took to the car in for Inspection and it failed. The report said that the O2 and catalyst was not ready. The car is not throwing any codes. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I didn't know that Texas inspections were that stupid. I thought they were like ours and if the lites work and the tires hold air and you give them $10 your good for another year.
 

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it means that you must have flashed the PCM too soon before you went to get tested. it takes a few heat cycles for the system to be ready after a flash.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It was installed in January. I drive the car every day but I have only put about 200-300 miles on it.
 

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there is a way to tell if your car is ready to test. i can't remember what you have to do. it is something with the engine light when you turn the key on. if it blinks or doesn't blink means the system is ready??

maybe the answer is in that 100 challenger tips thread?
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
They connected their equipment to the ODBII port. They start the car for few minutes and let it idle. The computer spits out whether it passed or failed.
 

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Got this off Chargerforums, your not the only one this has happened too. Try this guys advice.

When the monitors are not ready it`s because either codes have been cleared or because there has been a voltage interruption to the PCM, thereby clearing the memory. When this happens the PCM has to reset the monitors by testing the monitored circuits/systems. *Most* of the systems get monitored as soon as you start the car. But others require drive cycles for the monitors to reset. These would be the EGR monitor, the O2 sensor monitor, the O2 heater monitor, the catalyst monitor and the evap monitor.

The drive cycles vary by manufactueres and models. But they are all designed to reset after 40 drive cycles as long as there are no pending codes on the circuit the PCM is trying to test. Most of these monitors can be set simply by driving the car in certain situations and conditions.

I`ve found that the best way to do this is to start the car cold, cold meaning that the air temp sensor and the coolant temp sensor readings are within 6 degrees of each other, then drive about 40 mph for at least a mile, come to a complete stop and sit there at least 10 seconds. Then accelerate to 45-50 mph and cruise for at least another mile and come to s stop again, but try to sit there, in gear with your foot on the brake and not rolling for at least 30 seconds. Then accelerate again to at least 60 mph for at least 3 miles and stop again. Then one more good run at about 45 mph and all the monitors should be set except for the evap monitor. That one sometimes takes three of these cycles that I just described before the PCM will test the system.

Whatever you do, do not disco the battery. You`ll have to start all over again.

One last thing to check is all of your fuses. If a fuse that powers PCM memory is blown the monitors will be cleared every time you shut the car off.
 
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