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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
So I’m sorry if this seems like a stupid question, but I just got new brakes done for the first time. I bought the car brand new and don’t drive it much so this was the first time having the brakes replaced.

Now when I drive the car I have to put the brake pedal down a lot harder to come to a complete stop .And I also don’t have that “ hydraulic feel “ when stopping. I did call the mechanic and he told me because it was new brakes and rotors that as they were in the break would become more sensitive and I won’t need to put the brake pedal down as far. Is that true? He also said that the hydraulic pull that I used to get will also come back as the brakes wear in.

I’m just nervous that something wasn’t done right and don’t feel comfortable with it feeling the way it does. I’m used to the old cars where if you’re putting the pedal to the floor you actually He also said that the hydraulic pull that I used to get will also come back as the brakes wear in. I’m just nervous that something wasn’t done right and don’t feel comfortable with it feeling the way it does. I’m used to the old cars where if you’re putting the pedal to the floor you actually NEED brakes not the other way around . Any input would be appreciated ! Thanks !!😊
 

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So I’m sorry if this seems like a stupid question, but I just got new brakes done for the first time. I bought the car brand new and don’t drive it much so this was the first time having the brakes replaced. Now when I drive the car I have to put the brake pedal down a lot harder to come to a complete stop ..And I also don’t have that “ hydraulic feel “ when stopping. I did call the mechanic and he told me because it was new brakes and rotors that as they were in the break would become more sensitive and I won’t need to put the brake pedal down as far. Is that true ? He also said that the hydraulic pull that I used to get will also come back as the brakes wear in. I’m just nervous that something wasn’t done right and don’t feel comfortable with it feeling the way it does. I’m used to the old cars where if you’re putting the pedal to the floor you actually He also said that the hydraulic pull that I used to get will also come back as the brakes were in. I’m just nervous that something wasn’t done right and don’t feel comfortable with it feeling the way it does. I’m used to the old cars where if you’re putting the pedal to the floor you actually NEED brakes not the other way around . Any input would be appreciated ! Thanks !!😊
Did you have the brake hydraulic system flushed and bled after the new brakes were installed?

If not you should. And if not you should consider getting a new mechanic. IMHO he was remiss in not at least bringing this to your attention and suggesting it be done. Really more insisting than just suggesting...

New brakes can have a distinct lack of "braking bite".

When I buy a new car or after having new brakes installed I take the car out and bed in the brakes.

While there are all sorts of crazy bedding in procedures offered what I found works is from a high speed -- legal highway speed -- and when safe to do so apply the brakes hard and slow the car down from say 65mph to 45mph. Release the brake pedal and quickly accelerate the car up to speed again and apply the brake pedal again. Repeat this one more time for a total of 3 in all.

When I have done this I can feel the brake biting better. But after the 3rd time the improvement drops way down so I stop at 3 times.

Do not apply the brakes hard enough to lock brakes or trigger ABS. Do not bring the car to a complete stop. Just slowing the car down in a pretty aggressive manner from speed is all that is necessary.

After the last slow down be sure you drive the car normally and long enough for the brakes to cool down.

Even after you do the above you should still seriously consider having the brake fluid flushed and bled if it was not done at the same time the new brakes were installed.
 

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It does help a lot to "bed in" (wear in) the brakes. If it is not done, it will wear in eventually, but there is a good chance that the pads and rotors will develop a glaze that will prevent them from ever developing maximum braking effectiveness. A brake specialist once said that even factory pads have pretty good performance once the smoke has been let out. You don't need to brake so hard that the pads smoke, but a few good hard stops will help everything in the brake system work better together. I also second the brake system fluid flush, it is just good insurance for a car that isn't driven often, or for one that is more than a couple of years old. Also, you should be aware that different pads and rotors, even when worn in, may have a different feel from the original pads and rotors.
 

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It does help a lot to "bed in" (wear in) the brakes. If it is not done, it will wear in eventually, but there is a good chance that the pads and rotors will develop a glaze that will prevent them from ever developing maximum braking effectiveness. A brake specialist once said that even factory pads have pretty good performance once the smoke has been let out. You don't need to brake so hard that the pads smoke, but a few good hard stops will help everything in the brake system work better together. I also second the brake system fluid flush, it is just good insurance for a car that isn't driven often, or for one that is more than a couple of years old. Also, you should be aware that different pads and rotors, even when worn in, may have a different feel from the original pads and rotors.
Must emphasize a brake bedding in procedure should not involve hard stops -- actually bringing the car to a standstill -- but just hard braking which slows the car from speed. I repeat the bedding in process must not bring the car to a stop.

Once the bedding in procedure is done then my experience is a hard stop is ok.

Might add one can perform a hard stop at any time, on new brakes even. Accident avoidance takes precedence over anything else. But ideally and this is not hard to do before a hard emergency stop is required bedding the brakes is highly recommended.

Sure the brakes will (eventually) bed in with just "normal" usage. Countless car owners just let the brakes bed in this way -- without even realizing it is happening -- and the brakes are fine.

But I'm sensitive to the feel of the brakes and prefer to bed them in to get the braking feel I am accustomed too sooner rather than later.
 

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if pads were changed, but same rotors it takes ~ 300 - 500 miles for the pads to wear in.

another point is as pads go through multiple heat cycles from use, they'll settle in

If you're finding the pedal feels "soft" that might be a matter of bleeding the brakes or replace / flush / bleed the brakes (I do this every two years as a maintenance practice)

another point is different brake pad materials can yield different results (if not using OEM pads)
- some can have more initial "bite" some can have less. Some materials work better as they heat up with more use...
 

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Sorry, I should have said "hard braking" instead of "hard stops". A full hard stop can leave an imprint of the pad material on the rotors, causing a pulsating brake pedal. I do hard braking (at least three or four times) as part of every brake job, I don't release the car to the customer otherwise. Unfortunately, it is easier for me to do the work than to write a description of how to do it. Again, sorry.
 

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The wrong DOT Fluid can cause Spongy Brakes that Fast and simple some shops just pour in what ever that have, should always flush and do new proper spec DOT Fluid...
The Wrong Fluid in certain systems will stop the car but your pushing a lot harder on the Pedal.... Easy to miss this as an issue ...

Mixing DOT 5 (Silicone based) with DOT 3, 4 or 5.1 (Glycol based) is a NO No, it will damage your brake system. It is possible to mix the different spec Glycol fluids but it’s better to keep them separate. The main difference between the different spec Glycol fluids is the boiling point. The higher the DOT the higher the boiling point and a higher boiling point is better.

1013231
 

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DOT 3 is called out on the brake fluid reservoir. DOT4 is acceptable for use

and DOT 5 (silicone base) is a major no on vehicles with ABS systems, period
 

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Yes new brake pads will not have much stopping power but that should go away within a few stops. Did the mechanic use the OEM brake pads or some (maybe cheap) aftermarket pads? Or a different type of pads from the OEM?
 

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My new Power Stops are Ceramic and stop on a Dime and Give Change... Excellent Products with the Z17 Pads and the GEOMET coated Rotors...
High Performance the Z23's like my Friend installed on his 2010 R/T Beast also excellent Kits...
 

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I've been told that ceramic pads won't stop quite as well.
SXT and R/T models came with ceramic pads as OEM (I had '09 R/T M6 which had Super Track Pack and performance brakes as part of the M6 package)

Akebono is an OEM supplier (they make ceramic pads)
 
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