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Hi,

I just got my Challenger about 17 or so days ago. I love it. Never really had a car I enjoyed driving before this one.

Yesterday I was playing with all the features. I saw the awesome Vehicle Info display that gave readouts on the tires. However, I was pretty concerned that the tire pressure was around 43-46 psi (after a day's worth of driving). This morning it was 42 (cold).

I took a look @ the door jam's information sticker and it clearly said 32 psi was the recommendation.

I hope you guys don't mind, but I have some questions regarding the tires:

  1. The Challenger came with the blacktop package. I believe that swapped out the 19" standard wheels with a larger 20" setup. It's probably a newbie question, but does the size affect the recommended psi for the tires? Or should the psi always be 32, regardless?
  2. I have no idea why the tires are overinflated. Reading the forums here, some folks suggested they ship from the factory overinflated to account for transportation from factory to dealership. If that's the case, shouldn't the dealership have deflated the tires?
  3. I'm going to grab a tire gauge very soon. Is it safe for me to just deflate it to 36 psi (accounting for the increase from today's driving)?
  4. It's been about 17 days that I've had the car - was I in any danger driving with overinflated tires? Is the car probably fine after driving with overinflated tires? Is this even a big deal?

Thanks for your time
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Hi,

I just got my Challenger about 17 or so days ago. I love it. Never really had a car I enjoyed driving before this one.

Yesterday I was playing with all the features. I saw the awesome Vehicle Info display that gave readouts on the tires. However, I was pretty concerned that the tire pressure was around 43-46 psi (after a day's worth of driving). This morning it was 42 (cold).

I took a look @ the door jam's information sticker and it clearly said 32 psi was the recommendation.

I hope you guys don't mind, but I have some questions regarding the tires:

  1. The Challenger came with the blacktop package. I believe that swapped out the 19" standard wheels with a larger 20" setup. It's probably a newbie question, but does the size affect the recommended psi for the tires? Or should the psi always be 32, regardless?
  2. I have no idea why the tires are overinflated. Reading the forums here, some folks suggested they ship from the factory overinflated to account for transportation from factory to dealership. If that's the case, shouldn't the dealership have deflated the tires?
  3. I'm going to grab a tire gauge very soon. Is it safe for me to just deflate it to 36 psi (accounting for the increase from today's driving)?
  4. It's been about 17 days that I've had the car - was I in any danger driving with overinflated tires? Is the car probably fine after driving with overinflated tires? Is this even a big deal?
Thanks for your time
Welcome to the world of Dodge dealer prep. Not!

I bought 2 Dodge Challengers 2 months apart at 2 different dealers and both cars came with the tires inflated to around 45psi. I spotted this before I drove the 1st car away and asked and was told it was correct. Well, maybe correct for a car sitting on the lot but not being driven off the lot by the new owner.

I discovered the tire pressures were wrong and corrected them.

Second time I checked and found the tires not properly adjusted for pressure but rather fuss with the dealer over this I just drove off and then stopped a short distance away from the dealer and set the tire pressures myself.

The tires are over inflated by the factory to keep the tires from flat spotting from all the sitting on the lot.

The tires should be inflated to 32psi and this is the cold inflation pressure. Cold is "defined" in my Hellcat manual as meaning the vehicle has not been driven for 3 hours or driven less than 1 mile after sitting a minimum of 3 hours.

Get yourself a good tire gauge. I like a dial gauge and one that remembers the inflation pressure until you push a button to release this.

Let the car sit overnight and then check/adjust the tire pressures to 32psi. If the ambient temperature goes up -- or more likely moving into winter goes down -- you will have to periodically check cold tire pressure and probably add air. Roughly a 12F drop in temperature drops the air pressure in the tire by 1psi.

Since I do not have a compressor at home I stop at a gas station -- which happens to have "free" air! -- either on the way to work or on the way home and add several PSI to each tire -- knowing before hand due to the drop in air temperature the tire pressures are low -- and then drive to my destination. At work I set the tire pressure after the car has sat all day at the office. Or if I am on my way home I let the car sit overnight then the next day after the car has sat all night I check and if necessary adjust the tire pressure to 32 psi again.

I strive to when I add air at the gas station to add a few PSI more than I think will be called for so after the car has sat overnight the tire pressures are a few PSI over 32. Sometimes I get it right on the money.

AFAIK for all factory sanctioned wheel/tire sizes the air pressure is 32psi. A loaded car might require more tire pressure but this should be covered on the Tire and Loading placard that is on the driver side B-pillar or the rear edge of the driver's side door.

The tires have suffered no real harm from being driven over inflated. The more serious concern is how overinflated tires can affecting braking, handling, grip. There are several warnings addressing over (and under) inflated tires in the owners manual. Frankly I think it border line criminal a dealership lets customers drive off in over inflated tires.

Come on Dodge! Get off your ass and on your dealer asses and get your dealers in line so the first thing a new car owner doesn't face is driving off in a new Dodge unsafe because your dealers can't be bothered to do their job and prep the car properly.
 

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Go back to your dealer and tell the GM that they failed to lower the tire pressure like they were supposed to and see what he says.

Also if you haven't done your survey yet, write them up!!

What else did they forget?

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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"most" passenger car tires will run between 32 to 35 psi. There are exceptions and reasons why a slight alteration maybe beneficial. 43 - 46psi however is way to much. You'll encounter poor traction, reduced handling and accellerated wear in the center tread patch with that much psi in there.
Always confirm the PSI by a good quality guage and set all tires the same, cold, dont simply rely on the TPMS data displayed in car, as they can be off by several lbs.
 
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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Go back to your dealer and tell the GM that they failed to lower the tire pressure like they were supposed to and see what he says.

Also if you haven't done your survey yet, write them up!!

What else did they forget?

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Oh, yeah, let the dealer have it on the survey. I hate those that are claimed that anything but a 10 across the board is a "fail". No dealer has given me a 10 buying experience across the board.

Frankly the buying experience of buying 2 cars and the lack of dealer prep and worse the lying that the what proved to be overinflated tires and some of the goofiness regarding servicing my cars (being told the splitter guards should remain on the car when they are clearly molded with instructions the dealer should remove these) has me to the point I'm not buying a 3rd Dodge.
 
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