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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2013 challenger rt, and when I go over small cracks and bumps, I hear raddling under car if my windows are down, dont hear it when windows are up. I have replaced sway bar end links and sway bar bushings. The originals did look worn, but still hear the raddling. Any suggestions what else it could be?
 

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2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
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Catalyst in Catalytic Converter loose. Loose exhaust clamp. Loose heat shield?

A Guy
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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To add to A Guy's list: engine mounts, transmission mounts. An emergency brake cable retainer broken and letting a brake cable flop about?

In some cases -- with other cars -- I've heard the pads rattling the calipers. Could be a shock. Something on top of an under plastic panel? (A real long shot but a very nasty rattle noise was identified to be a nut caught in behind the crank pulley. The nut was too small to fall out (or jam in some way).

While I don't dimiss the converter as a possible explanation -- until you have identified the cause you have to consider lots of things -- I've had a car with a loose converter brick. I never heard it making noise like rattle. The thing made a deep/dull knocking sound after cold engine start. After a while, when things got up to temperature, the knock turned an irritating buzzing noise that would have made a loose heat shield sound like a symphony orchestra in comparison. Bad enough in the car but when it got so bad that when I pulled into work and co-workers clamped their hands over the ears I decided it was time to address this. The loose converter also resulted in an occasional -- sometimes months apart -- CEL with a P0430 (the other side would have been a P0420) OBD2 error code.

Could be nearly anything. Only you though are in a position to figure out what it is. A start would be getting the car lifted in the air via its tires and checking for anything loose. MIght have to remove some panels to confirm hoses/lines normally hidden by the panels are exposed so you can check if any have any play/movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well found out that its the calipers on both sides have a wiggle to them, like the sound Im hearing, all bolts are tight but Im able to shake them around. Haven't decided to either buy new ones or see if I can find away possible to fix the movement.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Well found out that its the calipers on both sides have a wiggle to them, like the sound Im hearing, all bolts are tight but Im able to shake them around. Haven't decided to either buy new ones or see if I can find away possible to fix the movement.
Calipers are loose? In all disc brakes I have worked on the calipers are bolted to the caliper mount with very substantial bolts that get torqued down. Representative is the brake caliper bolts (12mm diameter 1.5mm thread pitch) of my Porsche 996 Turbo. These get torqued to 63 ft lbs. (These are also use once bolts. They are not "stretch" bolts but Porsche nonetheless calls for them to be replaced if removed. They are not to be reused.)

If the new calipers are thinner and the original bolts are used the bolts may be too long. It is possible then the caliper bolts bottomed out into the unthreaded portion of the hole. While the bolt feels tight as one tightens it is not clamping the caliper down with the proper amount of force. Or if the hole is a through hole it may not be threaded all the way. Automakers are notorious for making a fastener only as long as it needs to be to only tapping a hole as deep as it needs to be. This is a cost savings thing and while the cost saved is small over millions of vehicles it adds up.

If the new calipers are thicker and the factory bolts used there may not be enough thread engagement and the bolts may pull the threads slightly and thus loosen.
 

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Calipers are loose? In all disc brakes I have worked on the calipers are bolted to the caliper mount with very substantial bolts that get torqued down. Representative is the brake caliper bolts (12mm diameter 1.5mm thread pitch) of my Porsche 996 Turbo. These get torqued to 63 ft lbs. (These are also use once bolts. They are not "stretch" bolts but Porsche nonetheless calls for them to be replaced if removed. They are not to be reused.)

If the new calipers are thinner and the original bolts are used the bolts may be too long. It is possible then the caliper bolts bottomed out into the unthreaded portion of the hole. While the bolt feels tight as one tightens it is not clamping the caliper down with the proper amount of force. Or if the hole is a through hole it may not be threaded all the way. Automakers are notorious for making a fastener only as long as it needs to be to only tapping a hole as deep as it needs to be. This is a cost savings thing and while the cost saved is small over millions of vehicles it adds up.

If the new calipers are thicker and the factory bolts used there may not be enough thread engagement and the bolts may pull the threads slightly and thus loosen.
Just a FYI. Most single piston calipers are full floating (probably over 90% of the cars on the road?), many 4/6 piston are fixed, but some are floating as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Alright figured out the problem. It was the guide pins of the calipers, got some new ones and no more noise.
 
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