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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a set of poly bushings for the rear cradle a while back, and finally got up the courage to perform the swap today. Took half the day, but I finally got the first one out. I'd like to nominate it here for the most obliterated rear cradle bushing removal.

Please post pictures if you had to mangle your bushings to a similar extent to get them out!

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Yea. It is about 300 or more
But you can with a sawzall and cussing also


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Did you need a special tool to get them out? I'm considering swapping out mine for some poly bushings.
There is a tool, but its only usable if you plan to completely remove the rear cradle which involves removal of the brakes, catback, differential, and perhaps a few other odds and ends. I opted to use the approach where you just loosen the rear cradle, letting it sag about an inch to where you can cut the bushings out with a sawzall. This guy did a pretty comprehensive video that I used as a guide.

My best advice is getting the car off the ground as high as possible so you have enough room to manipulate the sawzall, and to buy several cutting ends in case you break one or two. I hope you can tell by my second bushing photo the extent to which you need to cut. You need two complete cuts and the bushing will fall out with a few knocks of the hammer. Anything less and you can hammer, chisel, compress, and/or heat all day and night and they will not budge!

Good luck!
 

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There is a tool, but its only usable if you plan to completely remove the rear cradle which involves removal of the brakes, catback, differential, and perhaps a few other odds and ends. I opted to use the approach where you just loosen the rear cradle, letting it sag about an inch to where you can cut the bushings out with a sawzall. This guy did a pretty comprehensive video that I used as a guide.

My best advice is getting the car off the ground as high as possible so you have enough room to manipulate the sawzall, and to buy several cutting ends in case you break one or two. I hope you can tell by my second bushing photo the extent to which you need to cut. You need two complete cuts and the bushing will fall out with a few knocks of the hammer. Anything less and you can hammer, chisel, compress, and/or heat all day and night and they will not budge!

Good luck!
That's great advice and a super helpful video! You said you took half a day? That's not too bad, honestly, unless you were referring to getting JUST one out....

I'm trying to decide just how much I'd like to replace on my T/A 392 to tighten up the handling. For now, I'm looking at Petty's Garage dual tube front strut tower brace, 4 point rear brace, and their bolt-in subframe connector. I like the idea of replacing rubber bushings for poly but it's hard to know where to start and stop. Let us know how it turns out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's great advice and a super helpful video! You said you took half a day? That's not too bad, honestly, unless you were referring to getting JUST one out....

I'm trying to decide just how much I'd like to replace on my T/A 392 to tighten up the handling. For now, I'm looking at Petty's Garage dual tube front strut tower brace, 4 point rear brace, and their bolt-in subframe connector. I like the idea of replacing rubber bushings for poly but it's hard to know where to start and stop. Let us know how it turns out!
My experience was very much like the guy in the video's, in that it took me FOREVER to get the first one out, but only about 5 minutes each on the subsequent ones once I knew how to make the cuts. I have attached a couple more photos of the best looking bushing to show you how the cuts need to be made. There is simply no point in hammering on the things if the cuts have not been completed, but they will almost fall out once the cuts are made, that is the trick.

I started on the drivers side, lifted the car, removed the tire, then I loosened the bolts securing the two bushings on that side of the car, enough to where I could lower the cradle on that side about an inch. I started with the rear bushing since its the more accessible one. I used a sawzall with a metal or multi-material cutting end with fine teeth for metal. If you poke your cutting end through the little slots in the bushing, you will feel it make contact with whatever's above it. If you take a close look at the photographs of the rear bushing in Attachments 1-3, you'll see how you just work your cutting end from that slot in one direction, through the metal in the bushing. You'll need to stop cutting when you're through the bushing so as to not cut into the cradle frame. That's the only really hard part is knowing when to stop cutting, but I hope the extra photos can give you some perspective on the geometry.

The front bushing is a little trickier because its a bit more confined. You'll need to remove some screws/pushpins on a small plastic panel that blocks your access, and you'll have the added challenge of maneuvering the sawzall cutting edge around this extra piece of metal shown in the last photograph, but if you make two cuts like the ones I've shown in Attachments 4-6, the front one pops right out as well.

And then, install the new bushings and repeat on the other side. The bushings are torqued to 133 ft lbs. One last tip, don't torque the bushing bolts with a 3/8" drive socket. I cracked both my standard depth and deep well 18 mm 3/8" drive sockets before I reached 133 ft lbs.
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I bought a set of poly bushings for the rear cradle a while back, and finally got up the courage to perform the swap today. Took half the day, but I finally got the first one out. I'd like to nominate it here for the most obliterated rear cradle bushing removal.
BTW, which bushings did you go with and how do you like them? I got a set of Pedders bushings for Christmas and am returning them due to gaps between the metal inserts and the bushing in 3 out of the 4 bushings. Not sure if it's a real issue or not but I'm not comfortable with the amount play in them in my hand and I can easily see between the two parts without squeezing. I'm leaning towards Whiteline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BTW, which bushings did you go with and how do you like them? I got a set of Pedders bushings for Christmas and am returning them due to gaps between the metal inserts and the bushing in 3 out of the 4 bushings. Not sure if it's a real issue or not but I'm not comfortable with the amount play in them in my hand and I can easily see between the two parts without squeezing. I'm leaning towards Whiteline.
I went with Whiteline W93343 rear cross member mount bushings, and have no complaints about the fit, right and tight. I can imagine how frustrating that would be to wait for them to arrive and they are no good. Good call on rejecting them if they have gaps though, that can't be good.
 
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