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Hi,

I've been having some overheating issues with the 2011 SRT 392 I just got (haven't even been able to drive it for 2 weeks after getting it :(), and after having the t-stat and coolant reservoir replaced and a full fluid flush, it is still getting up to about 230-240 after just 10-15 minutes of driving. It has been quite hot here in Colorado, around 85-95 and it was all in stop and go traffic. The guy at the repair shop said that even just sitting still and idling and revving it to about 3k RPM for a few minutes, it hit about 230.

He said he did some research and found that Challengers just run hot by nature. However, 230-240 seems way too hot to me to be considered normal. I mean that's like boiling point, and I don't think you want your coolant boiling right?

I've never owned a Challenger before this, so perhaps I just don't know all the info. Hoping you guys can give some insight on if that is in fact normal and safe, and if it's not, what else could possibly be wrong at this point.

Thanks!
 

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I have a 160 degree t'stat in my 426 stroker (6.4L based) and cruise around with coolant temps at 180 deg. no matter the ambient temps. Oil temp. stays around 185. I'm also in CO and would at least go to a 180 deg. t'stat. 160 deg. needs some laptop tweak time. Temps. can also go up a bit if you have the A/C on.
 

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2013 5.7 gets to 220-230 in AZ temps (110). That’s idle. Spirited driving it gets higher. That’s when it was stock at least.
Does seem odd that you achieve those temps so fast though. I would look at the thermostat for that. But beyond that, if it isn’t overheating (going past the center mark) I would say no issue.


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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Hi,

I've been having some overheating issues with the 2011 SRT 392 I just got (haven't even been able to drive it for 2 weeks after getting it :(), and after having the t-stat and coolant reservoir replaced and a full fluid flush, it is still getting up to about 230-240 after just 10-15 minutes of driving. It has been quite hot here in Colorado, around 85-95 and it was all in stop and go traffic. The guy at the repair shop said that even just sitting still and idling and revving it to about 3k RPM for a few minutes, it hit about 230.

He said he did some research and found that Challengers just run hot by nature. However, 230-240 seems way too hot to me to be considered normal. I mean that's like boiling point, and I don't think you want your coolant boiling right?

I've never owned a Challenger before this, so perhaps I just don't know all the info. Hoping you guys can give some insight on if that is in fact normal and safe, and if it's not, what else could possibly be wrong at this point.

Thanks!
Well, I don't know about the SRT 392 but my Hellcat was in 100F+ temperatures the other day and the coolant temperature never got over 205F. Granted I had the A/C on which means the radiator fanwas running constantly which helps keep the coolant from see sawing up and down.

I did some driving in traffic with no signs of wanting to overheat.

The boiling point of the coolant depends upon its pressure. Under pressure the coolant will boil at a higher temperature. It is critical the cooling system be pressure tight. Any release of pressure can have the very hot coolant flash to steam and it will do so at the worst possible locations, the very hottest locations. Steam bubbles can form which block coolant flow/contact with the hot spots and localized overheating can occur which can cause a head gasket to fail or a head to crack.

Are you sure the radiator fan (or fans) are running when the temperature gets high? I believe my Hellcat radiator fan comes on at around 216F but I have not bothered to confirm this.

With prior cars I went crazy data logging, monitoring all sorts of engine telemetry but with the Hellcat it is get in and go and gas it when the tank gets low. Oh, I do keep an eye on oil temperature and less often coolant temperature and even less often oil pressure and other things, courtesy of the Performance Pages application, but I don't obsess over the data.

Not saying you are. The behavior you report does read a bit troubling.

(Oh, and I have to admit I data log my Hellcat, coolant temperature included, and the times I have looked the data over I do not see the coolant going over 218F to 219F.)

What I would do with other cars is start out with the engine cold with the A/C off and drive the car around and observe coolant temperature. I used an OBD2 code reader/data logger to view coolant temperature via the OBD2 port in "real time".

I'd then bring the car into my drive and raise engine RPMs to over 1K and hold until I could hear/feel the radiator fans come on. I'd note the temperature, let RPMs drop to normal speed, and then watch as the temperature dropped and note the temperature at which I could hear the fans shut down.

While the fans were running I'd get out of the car and check that both fans were running and blowing the same amount of air and the air was about the same temperature to confirm both radiator fans and radiators were doing their share of the cooling work. A couple of times I found one radiator not running. But in this case the one working radiator fan was still able to keep the coolant temperature under control with no compromise with the A/C performance either.

You need to confirm the radiator fans come on and at what temperature and at idle that the coolant temperature drops and then at what temperature the fans shut off. To give you some idea with another car I did this and the fans came on at 212F and shut off at 205F. A few times in real hot weather -- 116F in one case (85F to 95F ain't nothing...) -- the temperature got up even higher and the fans switched to high speed operation at 216F. In this one particular case the coolant temperature didn't drop but ended up going to 226F. It stayed there at freeway speed or driving on a boulevard even at idle speed. But it never went higher either. At some point as I drove out of the AZ heat and into slightly cooler weather the coolant temperature fell and that was that.
 

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'16 SP with A8.

On a cruise today, it was 85°. 65 mph on hilly two laner, 199 coolant temp, 212 oil temp, and 55 oil psi.
 

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2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 6Speed
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Hi,

I've been having some overheating issues with the 2011 SRT 392 I just got (haven't even been able to drive it for 2 weeks after getting it :(), and after having the t-stat and coolant reservoir replaced and a full fluid flush, it is still getting up to about 230-240 after just 10-15 minutes of driving. It has been quite hot here in Colorado, around 85-95 and it was all in stop and go traffic. The guy at the repair shop said that even just sitting still and idling and revving it to about 3k RPM for a few minutes, it hit about 230.

He said he did some research and found that Challengers just run hot by nature. However, 230-240 seems way too hot to me to be considered normal. I mean that's like boiling point, and I don't think you want your coolant boiling right?

I've never owned a Challenger before this, so perhaps I just don't know all the info. Hoping you guys can give some insight on if that is in fact normal and safe, and if it's not, what else could possibly be wrong at this point.

Thanks!
Any update on the heating issue?
 
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