Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone attempted a retrofit of factory HID components into a 2015+ Challenger with factory halogens?

I am considering attempting this but wanted to see if anyone else has blazed this trail...
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I don’t think so but you can just easily buy the kit


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks but i’m trying to stay as close to factory correct as possible. Seems like there are many aftermarket kits available but they involve installation of aftermarket relay harness and non OEM components. Don’t know if it naive but just seems like retro of a factory system might be more reliable.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
Joined
·
17,086 Posts
1st off, just about anything can be done if you have the big equalizer...$$$. That said, it's not going to be a direct swap as your car is not set to have HIDs, so the headlights are not all that's needed, if it's possible to swap in other parts from a car that comes with HIDs. This is a 2014, but look what they had to go through


http://www.challengertalk.com/forums/f19/halogen-projector-hid-conversion-29267/

I think you can expect similar, and at that point you are not OEM. I agree an established, known reliable aftermarket system would likely be easier, and less costly. You may also look at a good LED system at that point. They will work in the halogen projector housings, and will save you a lot.

A Guy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Thanks but i’m trying to stay as close to factory correct as possible. Seems like there are many aftermarket kits available but they involve installation of aftermarket relay harness and non OEM components. Don’t know if it naive but just seems like retro of a factory system might be more reliable.


Like A Guy said, it’ll be a lot easier and cheaper just to go after market. Diode Dynamics is very good, reliable and not that expensive.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
1st off, just about anything can be done if you have the big equalizer...$$$. That said, it's not going to be a direct swap as your car is not set to have HIDs, so the headlights are not all that's needed, if it's possible to swap in other parts from a car that comes with HIDs. This is a 2014, but look what they had to go through

Retrofitting OEM type HID's into a Dodge Challenger. - YouTube

http://www.challengertalk.com/forums/f19/halogen-projector-hid-conversion-29267/

I think you can expect similar, and at that point you are not OEM. I agree an established, known reliable aftermarket system would likely be easier, and less costly. You may also look at a good LED system at that point. They will work in the halogen projector housings, and will save you a lot.

A Guy
Thanks A Guy,

I appreciate your input, for me it’s not totally about saving money. Mind you, I also don’t want to spend $2000 buying new OEM HID projector headlights nor do I want to buy some generic kit and hack up my existing headlight housing. Hence, my plan is I bought two used HID headlight housings from a salvage yard, all internal components are tested good but housings are toast. I’m going to mock up these housings then install relays and fuses in the forward power distribution/fuse box in the OEM locations, from there I will reroute the original low beam power source to be my HID relay energize source. This should permit a very similar to OEM install with minimal additional wiring. The only additional wiring should be the the low beam/HID signal wires to relays and the larger gauge HID power source wires from the relays to the headlights. If all this works I will then remove my Halogen projector housings and transplant the HID components into them. If successful, I will have an HID setup that is nearly OEM for not much more than an after market kit. And, if I can ever get a straight answer from the dealer on flashing the BCM with sales code for factory HIDs I would route the relay signal wire to the BCM and have a truly OEM HID system.
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Like A Guy said, it’ll be a lot easier and cheaper just to go after market. Diode Dynamics is very good, reliable and not that expensive.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Hello labarre06,

Thanks for your input, for me it’s not about keeping it cheap or easy, I also don’t want to spend a fortune. It’s more about the challenge of doing it at a reasonable cost while duplicating or closely mimicking an OEM install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Hello labarre06,



Thanks for your input, for me it’s not about keeping it cheap or easy, I also don’t want to spend a fortune. It’s more about the challenge of doing it at a reasonable cost while duplicating or closely mimicking an OEM install.


Same here, I understand. I hate cheap crappy stuff. It’s an easy install, the hardest thing you’ll have to do is probably drilling a hole into your dust cover which is not hard at all. Even so, the diode dynamics HIDs comes with a rubber seal that’ll seal that hole that’s drilled for the wires to come out to go into the ballast. If you do go that route, just make sure you get the anti-flicker module with it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Okay, I worked up a wiring diagram that combines the current Halogen system with the proposed new OEM style install of Factory HID system. It needs a little more research and some minor edits but it’s close.

Update: I did a little more research and revised my wiring diagram. The result is I should be able to do an install that will require the addition of one higher gauge wire run from the factory power distribution panel to each headlight to run the HID power supply.

So the plan is:

1. Mock up the donor (case damaged) salvaged factory HID headlamps.
2. Install two factory relays and associated jumpers and wiring in the forward power distribution panel (PDP).
3. Run 1.0mm (18ga = 1.02mm) wire to HID driver for each mock up headlamp positions 46B and 65B of PDP.
4. Route jumper between existing low beam halogen headlamps power to positions 46C and 65C to drive HID relays closed when headlights are selected on.

Assuming this works I will then determine how to best option to open my halogen headlight assemblies and transplant the OEM HID components into them. After that I will then route the new heavier gauge wire for the HID driver.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Okay, this is for all those desiring to convert their Halogen equipped Challengers with OEM HID system components. This project is probably best suited for a “nut” like me that just has to do it the hard way. But hey, nothing ventured nothing gained.



The plan started and a few folks suggested that I just buy a kit. I looked at some of the HID kits but my goal was an OEM style installation, I didn’t want to drill holes in dust caps and have non-OEM wiring and relays. The process of getting to an OEM style solution was as follows:

1. I tracked down a wiring diagram for the existing Halogen system as well as the OEM HID system. The OEM system, just like aftermarket kits uses, relays to power the Low Beam/HID circuit. The high beam circuit with the Halogens is made up in the bulb and the OEM bi-xenon (HID) system utilizes aperture motor to allow a wider aperture thus allowing more of the HID beam to be projected from the headlight. This is the main difference in an aftermarket kit will not have this aperture control, thus it won’t meet DOT requirements thus opening the driver to a citation from local law enforcement. In a true OEM HID system the power to energize the HID relays in the Challenger is supplied by the BCM just like the power for the low beam circuit of the Halogen system but these do not share the same outputs from the BCM. Instead of trying to find a dealer to activate the HID option I decided to do a little more research, interestingly enough, the power to energize the HID relays on the Dodge Charger are the same as the low beam Halogen driver also being supplied by the BCM. This considered, I decided I would power my HID relays just like the factory did on the Charger. With the plan complete it was time to move on to practice application...

2. Okay, so we are through the preliminary planning stage now its time to acquire components. Wanting to stay as close to factory as possible I acquired a forward fuse box and harness from a HID equipped Charger. I did this more as a test to see if it was possible to dismantle the fuse/distribution box to extract the wires, relays and fuses to transplant into my existing fuse box. Disengage a few plastic clips and the underside cap on the fuse box comes right off. I was able to extract the necessary wiring: left and right Fuse to Relay, left and right Relay to HID Headlamp, left and right Ground for relay coil and left and right power for relay coil from BCM. I considered routing the BCM to HID relay coil to BCM but as that will need to go through firewall I decided it would be much easier to route to existing Halogen Low Beam circuit at headlight as this accomplishes the same thing. If I were to do this mod again I would try to find the terminals to install directing into my fuse box instead of transplanting from a donor box unless a donor box could be found on the cheap…that being said my donor box and harness was $120, Mopar parts gets about $20 each for the two relays and then a couple bucks for fuses and if possible to track down the terminals I figure there may be about $50 to retrofit the existing fuse box for the next person. I don’t mind the extra $70 though, I’m told a good education is expensive, LOL!

3. Next, I purchased a left and right OEM Headlight assembly from a wrecked 2015 Challenger that was HID equipped. The housing were toast but the internal components were serviceable. Upon receiving the damaged HID assemblies I first tested them to ensure the lights worked as expected. Next, having these housing gave me the opportunity to play around with methods to open the housings. The first one, I used a heat gun which resulted in successfully removing the lens without damaging it (any further then already damaged) but I was less then pleased with the resultant deformation of the housing bucket due to the prying necessary…my second attempt to open the next headlight was much more successful…I placed it in the oven (wife wasn’t home for this), the oven was preheated to 250 degrees F. I left it in the oven for 15 minutes and while it still wasn’t easy to separate the lens from the bucket the whole process resulted in less damage/deformation of the bucket. I mocked up the HID headlight assemblies to the existing factory harness (existing low Halogen beam temporarily re-routed to energize HID relay coil). Tested the system, bingo, it checks out. Next, I routed wiring from the existing low beam Halogen circuit at the headlights to the forward fuse/junction box to energize the HID relays. I backed the sockets out for the existing low beam circuit connectors and soldered my BCM to HID relay wiring to the crimped section of the existing wiring socket then insulated the connection with heat shrink tubing. This wiring was then wrapped in harness tape along with the new, heavier gauge” low beam HID wiring. This new harness was co-located from the forward fuse/junction box to the right headlight then continues on in front of the radiator support on to the left headlight assembly. Where possible, the new harness was wrapped along with the existing headlight harness resulting in a nearly perfect factory appearance. The two HID headlamps set me back $300. Given a quality kit from a company like Diode Dynamics is about $180 I again don’t feel too bad especially considering I retain OEM components.

4. At this point, I decided since I had the headlights out of the car and dismantled this was the time to add some “Demon Eyes”. I initially went cheap and bought a set of single color 3W LEDs with a small inline driver and cutoff circuit. I liked cost of this solution ($25) but one of the drivers failed after I installed it in my mocked up HID projectors. Since it’s such a pain to get to these I thought better of my plan and decided to splurge for a RGB LED solution with a Bluetooth controller. More planning was necessary at this point...I decided to keep all components internal to the headlights with the left side being the master control. I mounted the Bluetooth controller behind the factory circuit board using the existing mounting points for the OEM headlight controller circuit board, it was necessary to replace the existing three factory screws with longer hardware and nylon spacers to allow for the factory connector on the circuit board. The left Demon Eyes was mounted to the projector with a small bracket that I fabricated from 2024 T3 0.032 Aluminum. The wiring for the Demon Eye was routed to its driver (mounted within the left headlight bucket using 3M high-strength two-face tape). The left Demon Eye driver’s main circuit was then connected to the Bluetooth controller. The Demon Eye driver’s cutoff circuit was routed to the HID 12VDC circuit to deactivate Demon Eye when HID is powered. The Bluetooth Controller 12VDC input was routed to the left sidemarker circuit (Daytime Driving Light Circuit). This provided a switched circuit internal to the headlight assembly. Although the internal mounting of the right Demon Eye mirrors the left it’s wiring required the fabrication of a 4-wire harness to patch the output of the Bluetooth Controller from the left headlight to the right headlight (enter my donor harness again) I removed four wires from the donor harness head light circuits and fabricated the new left to right Demon Eye harness. Because there were multiple empty slots in both factory headlight connectors I was able to transplant my 4-wire Demon Eye harness into these existing headlight connectors. The 4-wire harness was co-located with the right to left headlight harness for a near OEM appearance. I wanted to go with a Diode Dynamics product but that was 6 weeks plus waiting period as their product is “out of stock”. The components I used for this mod are; Morimoto RGB Prism LEDs and the Morimoto XBT Bluetooth Controller. The XBT Controller has an iPhone or Android App to control the color output of the LEDs resulting in the ability to apply any color to the projectors. I also liked the prism design of the LEDs as this focuses the light from the LED directly on the back of the projector.

5. Now the tough part, with the mocked up components tested and ready for transplant, I removed the front facia/bumper to gain access to remove the existing Halogen headlight assemblies. You might again ask why would you go through all this trouble? And I would reply because I like the challenge, no seriously, I want to ensure I have an OEM style system as well it doest hurt that my system will also be DOT compliant unlike “kits” or LED bulbs that use the Halogen projector.

6. At this point it was time to “open” the Halogen headlight assemblies. I used the oven method described early combined with a pair of trim removal pliers, worked like a charm with very little deformation of the headlight buckets. I removed the existing Halogen components, circuit boards and internal harness (the HID internal Harness has heavier gauge wiring). For those of you that want to install one of the many kits that are available, good news! The factory Halogen projectors are very similar to the OEM HID projectors. The Halogens projectors have a shutter just like the HID projector to widen the aperture allowing more like out when the high beams are selected on. I elected to change/transplant all internal electronic components as I was concerned if I left the existing components I would end up with some fault being read by the BCM. I closed the headlight assemblies using 3M urethane windshield adhesive…I cleaned all the old sealer from the lens and groove the the headlight bucket. I placed the 3M adhesive in the groove of the headlight bucket and pressed the lens into the sealant and clamped until cured. I reinstalled in reverse order and my car now has a OEM HID system installed with Bluetooth controlled Demon Eyes.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
Joined
·
17,086 Posts
Wow, you are like a mad scientist! Congratulations, well done :thumbsup:


A Guy
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top