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Discussion Starter #1
I've read through a few threads on the subject of oil but I'm just looking for some more opinions on two subjects: regular vs synthetic, and change intervals.

I have a 2010 R/T auto trans that still has the original oil in it. I believe the car was made last spring and it currently has approximately 2,500 miles. I haven't driven it in months and it will likely be several more months (judging by this year's shitty winter) before I drive it again. So by the time I pull it back out of the garage it will be a year old. Though the manual says (I think) 6,000 miles or 6 months, is it really necessary to change that far ahead of the mileage schedule if you're only past the time interval because the car has been in storage? If I do go ahead and change the oil there's a very good possibility that I'll put maybe 1,500-2,000 miles on it then store it for the winter and be right back in the same situation. Any input on this? I'm sure I'm not the only one in this situation.

Also, how much sense would it make to start using synthetic if the car will spend most of its time sitting and not being driven? As mentioned above, I'll put maybe 2,000 miles a year on it and I never race. I do use synthetic in my other car but it's my daily driver. As far as oil, do you guys recommend any particular brands? For synthetic and conventional.

Thanks for any opinions!!
 

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Well everyone has their own opinions on oils so I am sure you will get some later on today. But, If you have 2500 on it now and stored for the winter, I would get that stuff out of there. There is just enough acids and other contaminates in the oil right now and it is just sitting. I personally would just put in your favorite brand 5w/20 and filter and change to a Synthetic after you have about 6000 miles on it. The R/T does not come with synthetic so I would allow the rings to seat a little more.
 

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If you have the car stored in a non heated garage on a concrete floor it will sweat/corrode underneath, I put an old carpet on the floor under mine and it keeps it dry
 

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If you have the car stored in a non heated garage on a concrete floor it will sweat/corrode underneath, I put an old carpet on the floor under mine and it keeps it dry
Carpeting on the garage floor is definately a good idea. When I lived in the Chicago suburbs and had my classic muscle cars....I put carpeting down also. As far as the oil, If you make sure that you don't do any short trips and drive at least 15-20 miles....well you've heated the oil to normal temps and you should not have a problem with acid or contaminates. I'm like you and put low mileage on my Challengers....about 1500 miles a year on the R/T and SRT. If I did short trips on them...then I'd change at 6 months. I put at least 20 miles on them when I take them out and to me....it's a big waste of money and resources to change it too often. I change every year. BTW...I put Mobil1 synthetic in my R/T at 3,000. That was my second oil change for the R/T. The SRT comes with synthetic and I changed that out after one year and it had 1500 miles on it. I like synthetic oil but I do believe in not going more than a year between oil changes. My 2 cents.
 

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^^X2, one year or 3k miles, synthetic here at 500 miles RP. Mine told me at 2500 to change oil also so yours may soon as you get driving again, but wasn't a year old yet as it did bout month before it's born on date.
 

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As has been note, contaminates build up in oil when a car is just sitting due to condensation that forms inside the engine. This is manifested when the vehicle is started especially if the oil is not brought up to operating temps and run for few miles. Modern oils are formulated to handle this to a point, synthetics do better. However, as much effort that is taken when engines are built, new engines still have sand from the casting and metal particles from borings and initial start ups so changing factory fills ahead of standard change interval is a wise action.

I think the bottom line is this, off the shelf oils, even synthetic, are only approximately $4.00 to $7.00 a quart at Walmart – a little more at local auto parts stores. A good off the shelf filer is $6.00 or less with the super premium oil filters being $13.00 or less. Is it not good insurance and does it not make sense to spend relatively little to have a fresh fill and to change it at the most according to the manual?
 

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As has been note, contaminates build up in oil when a car is just sitting due to condensation that forms inside the engine. This is manifested when the vehicle is started especially if the oil is not brought up to operating temps and run for few miles. Modern oils are formulated to handle this to a point, synthetics do better. However, as much effort that is taken when engines are built, new engines still have sand from the casting and metal particles from borings and initial start ups so changing factory fills ahead of standard change interval is a wise action.

I think the bottom line is this, off the shelf oils, even synthetic, are only approximately $4.00 to $7.00 a quart at Walmart – a little more at local auto parts stores. A good off the shelf filer is $6.00 or less with the super premium oil filters being $13.00 or less. Is it not good insurance and does it not make sense to spend relatively little to have a fresh fill and to change it at the most according to the manual?
I agree to a point. I baby my car....and I reaslly do mean baby it. Bringing a car to operating temps and continuing to do so every time you drive it will keep the oil clean and lengthen it's life considerably. I am a firm believer in taking care of any car properly and I have been very anal with my cars at times. But, I also believe that changing synthetic oil at 2,000 miles and 6 months intervals is going overboard. To me...once a year if you only have 2,000 miles is more than sufficient.
 

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I agree to a point. I baby my car....and I reaslly do mean baby it. Bringing a car to operating temps and continuing to do so every time you drive it will keep the oil clean and lengthen it's life considerably. I am a firm believer in taking care of any car properly and I have been very anal with my cars at times. But, I also believe that changing synthetic oil at 2,000 miles and 6 months intervals is going overboard. To me...once a year if you only have 2,000 miles is more than sufficient.
I completely agree if using synthetic. However, based on post after post on this board by members who have said Chrysler have refused, or at least tried to refuse warranty work I would not give them a reason to not honor my warranty in the very unlikely event that I had an oil related failure (bearings, rings, cam, lifters, etc.).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the info!!

I've heard the factory filter is a ***** to get off. Any ideas on the best tool or technique to get it off? I'd rather change the oil myself as I don't really trust quickie oil change places and I'm sure the dealership would charge probably $100 for a synthetic oil change.

Thanks again
 

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Oil Change via the top of engine.

How is this for an oil change technique?: My buddy has a Mercedes Benz, and he bought this machine that sucks the oil up thru a hose you feed thru the oil port. He says this is the way Benz recommends it be done. They also position the oil filter in the engine bay, so you don't have to crawl underneath to change it.

Anyone ever change their oil using this kind of machine?
 

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