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Discussion Starter #1
Just got my (oops, OUR) 2010 FF last week, other than the 120 mile trip home, we have only put an additional 150 babied,low speed miles on it..rain is keeping us off the road for now....it was fun learning the MDS stuff and autostick shifting methods....but WHEN can I simply flat-foot it and see what it's got? Worse yet, the WIFE is chomping at the bit looking to do a few burnouts! We are both well beyond our teen-age years and don't expect to spend all of our time abusing a $30k car, but we would like to occasionally drive this car in the manner for which it was made. Any thoughts or regrets of mild-to-wild thrashing too early with this car?
 

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My thoughts, and there are going to be plenty of others, are to give it at least 500 easy miles first. At that point let her rip-within reason. I would limit my bursts to 3-5 seconds for another 500 miles and then progress from there. As I said, just my opinion. But at 1000 miles you should be able to do whatever you would like.
 

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They've already done a full dyno pull at the engine factory, the very first time it was fired up. What actual good does babying it do? Here's what car talk has to say:

Car Talk
 

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The engine is dyno'd but is it broke in, I doubt it. I have never seen an engine being broke in by a pull on a dyno, remember it is not even in the car yet. Yes, the tolerances on new engines do not require the same break in as 40 years ago, but what about the transmission and the rear end. Also, read your owners manual. I feel that Dodge knows their products better than most of us, so I would at least go by their recommendations. Also in the Car Talk article at one point it says do you want to take a chance or have a vehicle last.
 

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Well I started beating on my Mopar 10 about 100 miles after i got it. I took it to the track at 1000 miles. Since I got the R/T Classic I have been beating on it. It did have 500 miles on it when I got it though. My SRT8 Charger had 6000 miles on it when I got it and the rear tires were burned off of it. :) That SRT8 pulled more RWHP and RWTQ out of the hundreds of SRT8's that were on my tuners dyno. I say break it in how you will be driving it.
 

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They've already done a full dyno pull at the engine factory, the very first time it was fired up. What actual good does babying it do? Here's what car talk has to say:

Car Talk
The run on the rollers is to verify proper engine /driveline function (water temp, oil PSI, no MIL/sensor faults) (and a check for fluid leaks) to simulate 30 mph to 55 mph operation that lasts just a couple of minutes before the car is released from the plant.

Its not a break-in run, just a test to make sure the vehicle functions properly after the initial assembly. The engine is run a typical rpm for street driving, not a WOT or wound up to redline to test for peak power.
 

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The owner's manual states that you should vary your speeds/rpm during the first 500 miles with no wide open throttle. The issue is more with the breaking-in of the drivetrain than the engine.

Some owners, however, advocate to "drive it like you stole it" from day one. This is an individual decision. I decided to exercise caution. Better safe than sorry.
 

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The run on the rollers is to verify proper engine /driveline function (water temp, oil PSI, no MIL/sensor faults) (and a check for fluid leaks) to simulate 30 mph to 55 mph operation that lasts just a couple of minutes before the car is released from the plant.

Its not a break-in run, just a test to make sure the vehicle functions properly after the initial assembly. The engine is run a typical rpm for street driving, not a WOT or wound up to redline to test for peak power.
In the Nat. Geo. show amazing factories or whatever that featured the Challenger, they showed that at the Mexico engine plant every single engine gets a full dyno pull right off the line before being shipped off to Brampton. Sure looked like a full WOT pull to redline.
 

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In the Nat. Geo. show amazing factories or whatever that featured the Challenger, they showed that at the Mexico engine plant every single engine gets a full dyno pull right off the line before being shipped off to Brampton. Sure looked like a full WOT pull to redline.
I had seen the other documentary at the Brampton plant that had the inspection worker putting the car on the rollers and doing the test simulation - that's what I based my information on.

Like a previous post mentioned, there's also the driveline (tranny, rear diff) components that wear in as well.

Anyone's free to do what they want with their car - I follow the mfgr's written recommendations in the owner's manual...it has served me well for the new cars I've done break-in process for.
 

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id think if any problems are going to show up there going to show up now so i'd just enjoy it and drive it like you normally would. you have a full warranty right now. ive never had any issues with my cars but then again any new car i have bought i usually trade in when i hit the 50k mark +/-
 

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Let's be realistic here. It's your car. If you are comfortable pounding on it from first fire, great, it's your car. If you believe that a car should be warmed up a bit before throwing it in gear and driving down the road on a daily basis, I would guess a proper breakin would be in order.
My 11 has just over 500 miles on it now and I have run a couple of quick WOT hits from 20-70 mph but always rolled into it and never from a stop. I have even brought it over 110 mph but it was an easy roll on not a WOT runup. The break in should be varrying conditions, speed and rpms. Not babied, but not abused. If you want it to last that is how you break it in. However if you plan to drive it for three years and trade it in, then drive it how you like. Almost any car can handle abuse for three years.
 

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I pulled out of the dealership sideways with mine with 24 miles on it and have not let up since! Do what you think will make you comfortable.
 

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In the Nat. Geo. show amazing factories or whatever that featured the Challenger, they showed that at the Mexico engine plant every single engine gets a full dyno pull right off the line before being shipped off to Brampton. Sure looked like a full WOT pull to redline.
I saw the same documentary, but there's no way they run tests on EVERY engine, they'd need to be running at least a dozen engines at a time in order to test every engine that came off the line.
 

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Drive it like you stole it.
Hey, as long as you tell that to the guy who's going to buy it from you...I don't have a problem with that. But I will be the guy who walks away from that car. I got a funny feeling some people may change their tune when it comes time to sell it. The drivetrain needs breakin just like the engine, beat on it early, pay the price later. Not being the "60's" has nothing to do with anything. To the OP...follow the owner's manual, read it...live it...be it.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I did read the owners manual, and it says to kinda baby it the first 60 miles, then drive "moderately" with a few WOT short blasts up to 500 miles, then you are good to go.....Is it really all about ring seating or are they more concerned about rods coming out through the bottom? Another strange item that caught my attention, the car came off the transport trailer with 22 miles on it....dealer could not explain why....what's that all about? Most of the new Challengers I have seen had 2-3 miles on them. Were these FF's DRIVEN too the upfit center?
 

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Some of the vehicles, a random pick, are pulled off the line and driven on a test track for a short distance. I have heard 10-12 miles is the amount. Not sure why yours had 22miles. What would the ff's be upfit with? Are you sure that the dealer did not "test drive" the car, and did you see it come off the truck and check the mileage at that point or did the dealer call you and tell you that it was in? Pretty sure the dealer wanted to "check it out".
 

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The 500 mile breakin is more for the rear dif than the engine. As long as you are at operating temp pushing the new motor in short burst is actually better for it. It helps to seat the rings quicker verses causing excess wear on the cylinder walls due to keeping the rpms too low early in life.

I've been fortunate to have high dyno numbers & quick 1/4 mile times with my stock cars and I believe it's the way I break my cars in. Not babied but not beaten. I've taken many of my rides beyond 200k miles without failure.

Here's a bit from what I read reciently but I've put to practice for the last 35 years.

"Most people seem to operate on the philosophy that they can best get their money's worth from any mechanical device by treating it with great care. This is probably true, but in many cases it is necessary to interpret what great care really means. This is particularly applicable when considering the break-in of a modern, reciprocating engine.
For those who still think that running the engine hard during break-in falls into the category of cruel and unusual punishment, there is one more argument for using high power loading for short periods (to avoid excessive heat) during the break-in. The use of low power settings does not expand the piston rings enough, and a film of oil is left on the cylinder walls. The high temperatures in the combustion chamber will oxidize this oil film so that it creates glazing of the cylinder walls. When this happens, the ring break-in process stops, and excessive oil consumption frequently occurs. The bad news is that extensive glazing can only be corrected by removing the cylinders and rehoning the walls. This is expensive, and it is an expense that can be avoided by proper break in procedures.
We must achieve a happy medium where we are pushing on the ring hard enough to wear it in but not hard enough to generate enough heat to cause glazing. Once again, if glazing should occur, the only remedy is to remove the effected cylinder, re-hone it and replace the piston rings and start the whole process over again."
 
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