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Discussion Starter #1
I've read through some other threads of people having this issue, but can't seem to find a common denominator. It's at the dealership for the second time in two weeks and I'm already fed up with how they're handling it. I've read broken valve springs, bad map sensor, and bad PCV, but would really like to think a bone stock 2015 with 60k on the clock wouldn't have broken springs yet. Any input from someone else who has had the issue would be greatly appreciated.

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Misfire on #3 cylinder

I've read through some other threads of people having this issue, but can't seem to find a common denominator. It's at the dealership for the second time in two weeks and I'm already fed up with how they're handling it. I've read broken valve springs, bad map sensor, and bad PCV, but would really like to think a bone stock 2015 with 60k on the clock wouldn't have broken springs yet. Any input from someone else who has had the issue would be greatly appreciated.

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I've just had the same issue, and mine turned out to be camshaft damage on #3 cylinder. My guy is talking to the warranty people now to get me an Aftermarket Cam so it doesn't do it again; and of course it has to have new lifters, pushrods, timing gear set and whatever else comes with it. I'm calling High Horsepower on Monday to see what they recommend and hopefully get the stuff from them. Their great guys up there at that place and treat you right. I've called several times just to ask questions and pick at their brain and no matter who I've talked to there they've always have been sincere, respectful, and not in a hurry to get me off the phone. That's who I buy from and that's who I recommend. Can't go wrong with those guys.
Hope this helps ya out man. Let me know what you find out. Mine is a 2014 Challenger SRT/8 6 speed manual with 106,000 + miles on it. Hahahaha, what's not to love. I just bought it recently (Feb) and got the extended warranty on it. Had it a month and the rearend went out in it, so I got a new one and it only cost me a $100



Have a good one!

Les
 

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I've read through some other threads of people having this issue, but can't seem to find a common denominator. It's at the dealership for the second time in two weeks and I'm already fed up with how they're handling it. I've read broken valve springs, bad map sensor, and bad PCV, but would really like to think a bone stock 2015 with 60k on the clock wouldn't have broken springs yet. Any input from someone else who has had the issue would be greatly appreciated.

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Can only speculate. While a bad valve spring is not unheard of to have several cylinders manifest this is unheard of.


No real experience with an engine fitted with a MAP but with a MAF there have been a few instances of a bad MAF causing misfires and limited to one bank too. A bad MAP sensor that results in incorrect fueling of the engine is certainly a possibility.


An intake air leak is another possibility.


Something interfering with fuel flow or fuel pressure to a bank is another possibility.



A bad injector can cause multiple cylinders to misfire. One cylinder has a bad injector. It leaks. Or is partially blocked. The engine controller detects an overly rich (or lean) condition from a cylinder bank. The engine controller removes (or adds) fuel to all cylinders of that bank. The otherwise good cylinders get lean (or rich) and misfire.



Or an under performing cylinder upsets air flow through the intake. As a result other cylinders do not receive a full charge of air and this can result in diminished output from the adjacent cylinders. Diminished output is a form of "misfire" and one or more cylinders next to/near the bad cylinder then get caught up in the misfire nastiness.

Cam (lobe) damage. Generally this is confined to one lobe but it is possible that the damage can extend to other lobes/lifters and more than one cylinder is affected.


Rodent damage can also result in misfires. Wiring harnesses are a favorite target for gnawing. Never experienced rodent damage with any of my cars but I have come upon a number of cars that have. Often a CEL and misbehaving engine is the first sign of what further investigation confirms is rodent damage.
 

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A random misfire can be caused by any of the following:

Faulty coil pack
Faulty oxygen sensor(s)
Faulty fuel injector(s)
Burned exhaust valve
Faulty catalytic converter(s)
Stuck/blocked/leaking EGR valve/passages
Faulty camshaft position sensor Defective computer
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input guys. Shortly after I made this post I went ahead and bought new plugs, MAP sensor, and I cleaned the drop in filter (although it wasn't very dirty). The code has come back on one time and honestly all I've been able to chalk it up to is bad gas. We were getting 89 like the manual calls for, but I've told my wife to just go ahead and start getting 93 everywhere. I know there's absolutely no benefit, but obviously multiple places around us have bad gas. It makes sense too, when I tuned my personal vehicle I was constantly 20-30 hp less on 93 than all my friends who lived in other places in DFW. Hopefully her sticking to 93 solves it, it's definitely got our gas mileage back to normal. She went from hovering around 18-19 back to 22.5-24.

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Discussion Starter #6
Update:
I believe something may be wrong with the camshaft. Whenever the code comes on the car will not enable MDS. But all of the dealerships around me refuse to touch the car because they claim it's a "history code" and not active. Last time I checked any misfire code should be addressed whether it's active or not, but I guess a shade tree mechanic like myself can't possibly be as smart as a Dodge tech . I reached out to Dodge Cares a while back but never responded because I thought I had solved the problem. Guess I'll reach back out.

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Update:
I believe something may be wrong with the camshaft. Whenever the code comes on the car will not enable MDS. But all of the dealerships around me refuse to touch the car because they claim it's a "history code" and not active. Last time I checked any misfire code should be addressed whether it's active or not, but I guess a shade tree mechanic like myself can't possibly be as smart as a Dodge tech . I reached out to Dodge Cares a while back but never responded because I thought I had solved the problem. Guess I'll reach back out.

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Not sure what is meant by a "history code".


If the CEL is on there is one or more active error codes. In this case then the freeze frame data along with the error code that triggered the freeze frame data storage needs to be read. There can be other active codes but the freeze frame code is what initially triggered the CEL. However, all codes are worth writing down.



If the CEL is not on there are no actives codes, even though one or more error codes might be returned. These are "stale" codes.


Now even with the CEL dark there might be one or more pending codes. There might even be one or more permanent codes.



Pending codes are codes that the engine controller is in the process of attempting to confirm whether there is an error or not. A pending code may or may not turn into an active code. The controller may not have a long enough or proper drive cycle in order to make a decision. Errors involving the converters can take a while as if there is a problem with converter the factory can be obligated to replace a converter under federal emission warranty. So the process to change a pending code to an active code is often pretty involved.


Permanent codes are codes that can only be cleared by the engine controller after so many warm up cycles with the error condition not present.


It is not surprising that MDS would not be activated if misfires (or other errors) were present. MDS to work its best requires a healthy engine. With one or more active error codes (and maybe even pending or permanent codes) the engine may not be considered "healthy" and if MDS was activated it could be the suspect cylinders. This presents a safety risk if the engine in MDS mode is so sick that the engine fails to respond in the expected manner in an emergency situation.



If there are no active codes there's really not much that can be done. Permanent codes can't be dealt with unless the triggering error condition returns and the permanent code then becomes an active code. Likewise until or unless a pending code turns into an active code there's nothing to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I understand better now. I've got a close friend that builds engines for a living. If Dodge Cares can't help, and the dealer won't attempt to do anything I'll probably tear down the top end with my friend and see if we can't see anything from there.

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Which cylinders are registering misfire? And what engine are we dealing with here? Model year and how many miles?

As others have stated, there's 3 areas that ya wanna work when it comes to MF - Fuel...Ignition...Mechanical.

Of course we're all guessing without being able to see the car/swap parts etc, but if you let us know what cylinders are misfiring, and what (if any) previous or recent work has been done, we may be able to help narrow it down...also any recent changes in fuel?

Bottom line - any competent shop should be able to diagnose a constant/consistent MF problem pretty quickly and easily. Coil, plug, injector swaps, leakdown & compression if needed, usually reveals the overwhelming majority of causes of MF.
 
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