Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can someone tell me by looking at these pictures if my pads/discs are in good, decent/normal or bad condition after ~1 year and 3 months of daily driving? Also on the front side, there is a lip on the disc edges, probably 1-2 millimeters.. probably also on the rear but i didnt go in and feel it with my fingers yet. Is that also normal and when should i start to get concerned?


This is from the front wheel
999476



And this the rear.
999477


Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
2018 Scat Pack SHAKER in Plum Crazy
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
All I can say is they don't look "bad", how many miles? I am ready to start a "rotor fund" for my fronts.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,782 Posts
The best way is to measure (with micrometer) the thickness of the rotors - there's a minimum value usually stamped into the hub portion.

You have the 6 piston setup on yours - FYI the stock pads are very aggressive material (as you've already noticed all the dust) - there are other options for brake pads that will both reduce the dust and rotor wear.

the 6 piston OEM rotors are very pricey, BTW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,600 Posts
Do not know what the wear amount is for the Dodge brake rotors With another brand of car the wear amount was 2mm. Thus a "1mm" lip around the rotor was a good sign the rotors were getting to their replace by date.

'course, these cars also had a wear sensor in each pad. Invariably a pad wear sensor would make contact and the brake wear warning light on the dash would light up.

In the case of the front brakes the rotor may be worn some is worn some but by how much I can't say.

You need to know the rotor wear amount and then be sure you accurately measure the wear lip. You have to be careful. My Hellcat rotor lip looks "huge" but when I feel it it is not that much. The sloping tends to magnify the amount of lip just by looking. But a feel finds the lip not so bad.

From what I can see of the pads the pads appear to have plenty of pad material but again you have to be careful. Not all pads wear the same or evenly. Thus you need to be able to get the car in the air so you can get a view of the pads from all directions.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,782 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: MiHiHemi

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited by Moderator)
Hmm okay, the car has 9000 miles so far.
Do the 2019 challengers have this wear sensor for the rotors? and where can i find info on the minimum value for the rotor thickness? Do i need to take the wheels off to see this number?

Also yes, I've already ordered the OEM rotors/pads for the first change - will definitely look to purchase different ones as the OEM are hella expensive.

But okay, like in general, is it usual to change the rotors before you change the pads even once? I don't track it and don't drive it like a total maniac. I don't hammer on the brakes or do any kind of linelock/burnouts that would prematurely wear the components. The guys at the shop had this question mark expression like, "why the hell are you ordering rotors for a new car like yours?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
I did new rotor rings only and re-used the OE hats but I worked em hard on the road courses. Went with DBA rings on the front and installed them myself for a little over $800.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,782 Posts
the DBA 5000 series rotors are substantially less (you re-used the hat and mounting hardware) than the OEM rotors.

there's a number of aftermarket companies (Powerstop, Akebono, Hawk) that make pads which are less aggressive (lower rotor wear) than the OEM and also produce far less brake dust.

At 9K, you'll have a long way to go - I recall another member had 18 - 20k of use with the OEM and had noted some wear.

Depending on the user, habits and conditions rotor service life will vary. Someone using them really hard could potentially wear a set out 15 - 20K and more moderate might make it through a 2nd set of pads.

For the street - the 6 OEM piston pads are overkill, IMO in light of the wear and the cost of the OEM parts for the service life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
the DBA 5000 series rotors are substantially less (you re-used the hat and mounting hardware) than the OEM rotors.

there's a number of aftermarket companies (Powerstop, Akebono, Hawk) that make pads which are less aggressive (lower rotor wear) than the OEM and also produce far less brake dust.

At 9K, you'll have a long way to go - I recall another member had 18 - 20k of use with the OEM and had noted some wear.

Depending on the user, habits and conditions rotor service life will vary. Someone using them really hard could potentially wear a set out 15 - 20K and more moderate might make it through a 2nd set of pads.

For the street - the 6 OEM piston pads are overkill, IMO in light of the wear and the cost of the OEM parts for the service life.
Yes, will look into other options in the future. I was looking at those DBA rotors some time ago, wasnt exactly sure what i needed - im guessing THESE would be the rings i need for the front? - Also what was a bit off-putting was the warranty thing. Would having a shop change to this kind of setup void it? (im not very mechanically savvy). Is there adequate information on how much torque is needed to secure the hat on the rings etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,600 Posts
Hmm okay, the car has 9000 miles so far.
Do the 2019 challengers have this wear sensor for the rotors? and where can i find info on the minimum value for the rotor thickness? Do i need to take the wheels off to see this number?

Also yes, ive already ordered the OEM rotors/pads for the first change - will definitely look to purchase different ones as the OEM are hella expensive.

But okay, like in general, it usual to change the rotors before you change the pads even once? I dont track it and dont drive it like a total maniac, i dont hammer on the brakes or do any kind of linelock/burnouts that would prematurely wear the components.. The guys at the shop had this question mark expression like "why the hell are you ordering rotors for a new car like yours?"
Think you are a bit premature with the buying of new pads and rotors. My 2018 Hellcat has over 25K miles and so far has not needed pads and rotors. My car does not receive any track time and while I don't drive the car like a total maniac the brakes get used. The car is heavy and can build speed quickly and being an automatic with less slowing due to engine compression when I lift off the throttle the brakes have to provide more braking so the brakes get used.

In my limited experience rotors needing to be changed before pads is very rare. Barring some owner fitting super aggressive/abrasive pads which destroy the rotors or a defective rotor the rotors last as long as the pads.

Generally the pads wear out first. Then usually both pads and rotors are replaced.

Some owners will of course replace just the pads feeling that because the rotors are (probably) not worn out new pads is sufficient. The risk is the new pads wear the rotors down to below their minimum thickness and then while the pads look ok and the rotors "look" ok the rotors are under size.

With my high performance cars over the years when I have had to do a brake job when the brake pad wear warning light came on I replaced both pads and rotors and other brake hardware as the factory service/repair manual called for.

Also, consider a brake fluid flush/bleed every couple of years. This will go a long way to helping extend the life of other parts of the brake system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Think you are a bit premature with the buying of new pads and rotors. My 2018 Hellcat has over 25K miles and so far has not needed pads and rotors. My car does not receive any track time and while I don't drive the car like a total maniac the brakes get used. The car is heavy and can build speed quickly and being an automatic with less slowing due to engine compression when I lift off the throttle the brakes have to provide more braking so the brakes get used.

In my limited experience rotors needing to be changed before pads is very rare. Barring some owner fitting super aggressive/abrasive pads which destroy the rotors or a defective rotor the rotors last as long as the pads.

Generally the pads wear out first. Then usually both pads and rotors are replaced.

Some owners will of course replace just the pads feeling that because the rotors are (probably) not worn out new pads is sufficient. The risk is the new pads wear the rotors down to below their minimum thickness and then while the pads look ok and the rotors "look" ok the rotors are under size.

With my high performance cars over the years when I have had to do a brake job when the brake pad wear warning light came on I replaced both pads and rotors and other brake hardware as the factory service/repair manual called for.

Also, consider a brake fluid flush/bleed every couple of years. This will go a long way to helping extend the life of other parts of the brake system.
Solid info, yes maybe a bit premature, but id rather have it ready to go when needed, because like i said previously, i already placed the order (almost 4 months ago) and i still have no news when they will arrive. The shop last said that everything is clogged up in the USA where it comes from due to this COVID crap. No stock, production halted or shipping delay, no idea whats going on. So im not really expecting it to arrive until the end of the year haha!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,782 Posts
Yes, will look into other options in the future. I was looking at those DBA rotors some time ago, wasnt exactly sure what i needed - im guessing THESE would be the rings i need for the front? - Also what was a bit off-putting was the warranty thing. Would having a shop change to this kind of setup void it? (im not very mechanically savvy). Is there adequate information on how much torque is needed to secure the hat on the rings etc?
the brakes, clutch, and tires are wear items that unless there's an outright failure they are dealt with under a 12 mo / 12k warranty.

I'd have the brakes done by a shop (other than dealer) that works on higher end / performance cars. Dealerships usually will only install their parts from the manufacturer, not aftermarket.

If you have items on order and not received - I'd cancel and get the aftermarket stuff. You still have miles to go before anything wears so you're probably two years out before any pad replacements might be on the horizon.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top