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2015 RT 5.7 M6
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do you know how to get it working with an automatic?
I really should start paying attention to this thread, you really are putting in all the hours.
Tazer was easy to use, Alfa OBD, I'll probably turn my car into a paper weight.
Post up the log of your BCM using alfaOBD. I suspect the autos will also need the chassis type changed but I don't know if they are different than the manuals. Look at my first post in this thread, I give the changes I made to get it to work for my car.

Basically the key to get it working is turning on STP and drive modes (autos will also probably need trans mode set as well) but most importantly getting the correct chassis type. You then have to initialize the ABS module so it knows the configuration has changed. Best way to know what needs changing is if someone with an auto and STP can post their BCM and ABS logs for comparison like DionR did for me.

I seriously searched to see if anyone was able to get launch control to work on a non-STP equipped challenger/charger and I found nothing so I thought it was not possible. Even on the HP tuner site, folks were asking how to do it. It's so cool it worked with minimal changes to the BCM.
 

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Post up the log of your BCM using alfaOBD. I suspect the autos will also need the chassis type changed but I don't know if they are different than the manuals. Look at my first post in this thread, I give the changes I made to get it to work for my car.

Basically the key to get it working is turning on STP and drive modes (autos will also probably need trans mode set as well) but most importantly getting the correct chassis type. You then have to initialize the ABS module so it knows the configuration has changed. Best way to know what needs changing is if someone with an auto and STP can post their BCM and ABS logs for comparison like DionR did for me.

I seriously searched to see if anyone was able to get launch control to work on a non-STP equipped challenger/charger and I found nothing so I thought it was not possible. Even on the HP tuner site, folks were asking how to do it. It's so cool it worked with minimal changes to the BCM.
I wonder if all these mods can be written into a file and loaded into Alpha OBD and then loaded to a car, kind of like HP Tuners and Diablo do. You could easily become the "Hemifever" of BCM tuning.
 

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AlfaOBD seems pretty cool. I"m an "option" kind of guy and love messing with settings. However, how dangerous is this tool if you do something wrong? I'm assuming that you can really screw things up? Just be careful - would hate to see something 'brick' their BCM by playing with these settings!

I have a 2018, so I would have to buy a bypass to even mess with it. That may be a good thing for me. :)
 

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Not sure if the 2018s are supported. I think the biggest danger is not having your stock setting. My experience is if you change something and you get a bunch of warnings then changing it back fixes it. With the current software you can't make changes all at one an load it, you basically have to do it like Tazer...go through the configurations one by one.
 

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do you know how to get it working with an automatic?
I really should start paying attention to this thread, you really are putting in all the hours.
Tazer was easy to use, Alfa OBD, I'll probably turn my car into a paper weight.
I know it's not a direct comparison, but I am planning on grabbing a read from a 2015 SP A8 this weekend. I expect things will be different, but it might be that they have similarities, too.

It's a little disconcerting to have your dash light up like a christmas tree, but you could go through the same steps and see if it worked for an auto. If not, then we would know there is a difference and you can set it all back. My gut says there isn't or people like the ZAutomotive would have more inputs or something during mods using a Tazer.
 

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I have seen too many folks complain about the AES rattling or is too quiet and they want it 100% open all the time. For me no AES means one less thing to fail.
Make sense.

One of the things that is attractive to me is the dual nature of some of this stuff. Want a hard edged ride with a loud exhaust note and aggressive shifts? Set your engine, steering and trans (for an A8) to sport (or track) and have fun. Want to just cruise through the country side and enjoy the sunshine? Leave it all in comfort mode. Even better if you have the three mode suspension.

Note that I can neither afford a car with 3 mode suspension, nor afford to fix it if it goes bad. :cool:
 

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So what about the blind spot detectors? I work hard to check my blind spots, but would be nice to have the extra help.

Wonder if someone could add the mirrors and then turn it on in the BCM and have it work. I saw settings for it when I was scrolling through the list.

This is assuming the parking sensors are the same for the blind spot detectors.
 

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So what about the blind spot detectors? I work hard to check my blind spots, but would be nice to have the extra help.

Wonder if someone could add the mirrors and then turn it on in the BCM and have it work. I saw settings for it when I was scrolling through the list.

This is assuming the parking sensors are the same for the blind spot detectors.
You certainly can. If you compare my log with yours I think you will find the options you need to change. You could also add UGDO (universal garage door opener) which I had set on my but I did not see it on yours. This is where the build sheets come handy as well.
 

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I wondered what UGDO was. Something else I am wanting someday (after I finish my shop build).

It occurred to me just now that maybe if I enable it all, perhaps I would get the audio warning even if I didn't have the mirrors with the light. Hmm...

Or I might just get warning lights on my dash all the time because the mirror lights were missing.

Speaking of build sheets, I have both the equipment list off the internet and the one showing the codes. I could post those as well if they would be useful.
 

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I was thinking build sheets (window stickers) with logs would be the most benefitial for folks as it helps narrow down what setting go with what options.
 

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Looks like the BSD sensors are different than the park sensors. So those would have to be added, as well as changing out the wiring harness to the park sensors. No idea if the wiring for the BSD sensors is there after the plugs or not.

Darn.
 

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Description
BLIND SPOT MONITOR SYSTEM
The Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) system is an available factory-installed electronic driving aid. This system provides both blind spot and Rear Cross Path (RCP) monitoring features. While the vehicle is being driven, this system alerts the vehicle operator when it detects other highway licensable vehicles that enter the targeted blind spot and cross path alert zones. These zones lie immediately to the right and behind as well as immediately to the left and behind the vehicle. Due to the surrounding rear vehicle structure or other adjacent stationary obstacles outside of the vehicle, these zones might be more difficult for the vehicle operator to easily monitor.

When the BSM system detects another vehicle within one of the target zones, the system is capable of illuminating an amber triangle icon located in each outside rear view mirror glass, as well as reducing audio system volume and sounding chime tones through the audio system speakers to provide the vehicle operator with both visual and audible alerts. However, it should be noted that this BSM system is intended to supplement and not to replace safe vehicle operating habits, including proper adjustment and use of the standard equipment inside and outside rear view mirrors.

The BSM system includes the following major components, which are described in further detail elsewhere in this service information:

  • Blind Spot Displays - Vehicles equipped with the BSM system have an amber Light Emitting Diode (LED) unit mounted on the back of each outside rear view mirror glass case behind the translucent outline of a triangle in the mirror glass. The BSM system illuminates the appropriate triangle icon in amber each time a vehicle is detected in one of the blind spot or rear cross path alert zones.
  • Blind Spot Sensors - Vehicles equipped with the BSM system have both a Left Blind Spot Sensor (LBSS) and a Right Blind Spot Sensor (RBSS). The LBSS and the RBSS each include a RAdio Detection And Ranging (RADAR) sensor and an integral electronic control unit. Each of the two control units is independent, communicates on the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus with its respective Driver Door Module (DDM) or Passenger Door Module (PDM), which is hard wired to its respective right or left blind spot display. The LBSS and the RBSS are concealed behind their respective right or left outboard end of the rear bumper fascia, just behind each rear wheel opening.
  • Door Modules - An electronic Driver Door Module (DDM) and Passenger Door Module (PDM) receives electronic messages over the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus from its respective Left Blind Spot Sensor (LBSS) or Right Blind Spot Sensor (RBSS) to control a hard wired output to the BSM display in its respective outside rear view mirror. The door modules are concealed behind the door trim panels on each door inside panel.
  • Electronic Vehicle Information Center - In vehicles equipped with the optional BSM system, the Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) within the Instrument Cluster (IC) (also known as the Common Instrument Cluster/CIC) may display textual warnings and error messages related to the current operating status of the BSM system.
  • Radio Receiver Module - The virtual buttons in the touch screen of the optional premium Radio Receiver Module (RRM) (also known as the radio or the head unit) provide an interface that allows the vehicle operator to enable, disable and modify certain BSM system settings using the customer programmable features option.
Hard wired circuitry connects the BSM system components to each other through the electrical system of the vehicle. These hard wired circuits are integral to several wire harnesses, which are routed throughout the vehicle and retained by many different methods. These circuits may be connected to each other and to the vehicle electrical system through the use of a combination of soldered splices, splice block connectors and many different types of wire harness terminal connectors and insulators. Refer to the appropriate wiring information. The wiring information includes wiring diagrams, proper wire and connector repair procedures, further details on wire harness routing and retention, as well as pin out and location views for the various wire harness connectors, splices and grounds.

The BSM system components cannot be adjusted or repaired. If any of the BSM system components becomes damaged or ineffective, that component must be replaced.


Operation
BLIND SPOT MONITOR SYSTEM
The primary components of the Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) system are the microcontroller based Electronic Control Units (ECU) integral to each of the two RAdio Detection And Ranging (RADAR) sensors, one behind each outboard side of the rear bumper fascia. The two sensors are known as the Right Blind Spot Sensor (RBSS) and the Left Blind Spot Sensor (LBSS). Each ECU operates on battery current received from a fuse in the Power Distribution Center (PDC) whenever the status of the ignition switch is On. Each ECU has a path to ground at all times through a take out and eyelet terminal of the body wire harness that is secured to the body sheet metal. These ECU communicate with each other, with other electronic modules in the vehicle or with a diagnostic scan tool over the Controller Area Network (CAN) - Interior High Speed (IHS) data bus network.

Each BSM system ECU continually monitors its own BSM system circuits and components for readiness, and will store a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) for any fault that is detected. When a BSM system ECU stores a DTC, it sends an electronic request message to the Instrument Cluster (IC) (also known as the Common Instrument Cluster/CIC). The IC will then display a SERVICE BLIND SPOT SYSTEM or BLIND SPOT SYSTEM TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE textual message in the Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) to alert the vehicle operator.

The Powernet network architecture used in this vehicle includes the Body Control Module (BCM) (also known as the Common Body Controller), which is also a CAN bus gateway and will relay messages received on the CAN-IHS data bus to the IC over the CAN-C data bus. The BSM system ECU sends request messages via the CAN-IHS bus to the BCM. Each BSM system ECU also monitors electronic messages received over the CAN-IHS data bus from the Radio Receiver Module (RRM) (also known as the radio or the head unit) through the CAN-C bus via the BCM gateway indicating the customer programmable features settings for the BSM system.

Each BSM system ECU receives and analyzes data inputs directly from its own radar sensor, calculates and provides the proper electronic messages over the CAN-IHS bus to the BCM as well as to the Driver Door Module (DDM) or Passenger Door Module (PDM). The DDM and PDM use hard wired outputs to illuminate the visual alert displays in their respective right or left outside rear view mirrors, as well as calculates and communicates the proper audible alert output requests to the RRM over the CAN bus network.

The BSM radar sensors allow the BSM system ECU to locate and identify nearby objects of interest meeting the criteria established by algorithms within the system software. The BSM displays provide the vehicle operator with a visual alert indicating that an object of interest has been detected within one of the vehicle detection zones. The BSM audible alerts are then issued by the RRM through the appropriate audio system speakers based upon electronic audible alert request messages received from the BSM system ECU. Each BSM system ECU also sends electronic radio mute request messages over the CAN data bus to the RRM whenever an audible alert is requested. This message activates the radio mute function while the audible alert is being sounded, then resumes normal radio function when the alert is completed.

The hard wired circuits between components related to the BSM system may be diagnosed using conventional diagnostic tools and procedures. Refer to the appropriate wiring information. The wiring information includes wiring diagrams, proper wire and connector repair procedures, details of wire harness routing and retention, connector pin out information and location views for the various wire harness connectors, splices and grounds.

However, conventional diagnostic methods will not prove conclusive in the diagnosis of the BSM system or the electronic controls and communication between ECU and other devices that provide some features of this system. The most reliable, efficient and accurate means to diagnose the BSM system or the ECU and communication related to BSM system operation requires the use of a diagnostic scan tool. Refer to the appropriate diagnostic information.

BLIND SPOT MONITOR MODE

Unless disabled in the customer programmable features settings received through the Radio Receiver Module (RRM) (also known as the radio or the head unit), the Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) mode is active only when the transmission gear selector is in a position other than Reverse (R) or Park (P). The BSM mode is intended to provide a visual alert to the driver when a target vehicle (object of interest) is located in the lane adjacent to and just behind either outside rear view mirror (the detection zone), in the blind spot area where vision of target vehicles may be inhibited by the rear structure of the host vehicle. If a turn signal is activated in the host vehicle in the same direction as that in which the target vehicle is located, a single audible alert tone will also be generated. The audible alerts of the BSM mode are not active unless the turn signal is activated.

The width of the BSM mode detection zone covers one traffic lane over on each side of the host vehicle, approximately 4.0 meters (13 feet). The length of the BSM mode detection zone starts at the outside rear view mirror and extends approximately 4.5 meters (15 feet) rearward from the rear edge of the rear fascia. The BSM mode visual alerts are activated immediately if an object of interest is within the detection zone and meets the warning criteria. However, the BSM system will not activate these alerts if:

  • The object of interest (target vehicle) comes from the rear of the detection zone and passes the host vehicle at a speed greater that 50 kilometers-per-hour (31 miles-per-hour).
  • The object of interest (target vehicle) enters the detection zone from the front and remains in the zone for less than 1.5 seconds.
  • The object of interest (target vehicle) passes through the detection zone with a relative speed greater than 20 kilometers-per-hour (12 miles-per-hour).
  • The object of interest (target vehicle) passes the host vehicle from the opposite direction.
The BSM mode audible alert may be deactivated if the operator prefers using the customer programmable features settings within the RRM. The BSM mode can be configured for visual and audible alerts, visual alerts only or for the entire BSM system (including Rear Cross Path/RCP mode) to be turned Off.

REAR CROSS PATH MODE

Unless disabled in the customer programmable features settings received through the Radio Receiver Module (RRM) (also known as the radio or the head unit), the Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) system provides a feature called Rear Cross Path (RCP) mode. The RCP mode is active only when the transmission gear selector is in the Reverse (R) position. The RCP mode is intended to aid the driver when backing out of parking spaces where vision of vehicles crossing laterally through the rear path of the host vehicle may be blocked. The host vehicle must proceed slowly and cautiously out of the parking space until the rear end of the vehicle is exposed. The BSM radar sensors will then have a clear view of the crossing traffic and, if an oncoming vehicle (object of interest) is detected, will generate visual and audible alerts to the operator of the host vehicle.

The BSM system monitors the rear detection zones on both sides of the vehicle for objects that are moving toward the side of the vehicle with speeds of from 1 to 3 kilometers-per-hour (1 to 2 miles-per-hour) up to 35 kilometers-per-hour (22 miles-per-hour), such as typically encountered in parking lot situations. In vehicles equipped with the BSM option, the RCP mode is enabled from the factory as a default. The RCP mode can be manually disabled and enabled by the vehicle operator using the customer programmable features option of the RRM.

The RCP mode normally uses the same BSM system customer programmable features settings. However, the RCP mode will always include the audible alert feature, even if it was disabled for the BSM mode using the RRM customer programmable features settings. The audible alert can not be deactivated for the RCP mode. The RCP mode visual alert is illuminated only in the display located on the same side of the vehicle where the object of interest is detected. Likewise, the RCP mode repeating short audible alert is issued only through the audio system speakers located on the same side of the vehicle where the object of interest is detected.

STANDBY MODE

The Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) system remains in standby mode as long as the automatic transmission gear selector is in the Park (P) position. In the standby mode the system receives vehicle information, responds to changes in customer programmable features settings received through the Radio Receiver Module (RRM) (also known as the radio or the head unit) and can perform limited self-diagnostics indicating hard system fault conditions.

Operation

The Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) RAdio Detection And Ranging (RADAR) smart sensors (also known as the Left Blind Spot Sensor/LBSS and Right Blind Spot Sensor/RBSS) are each controlled by their on-board microcontroller and control circuitry. When the microcontroller recognizes that the appropriate conditions exist, it will energize the sensor to generate 25 Gigahertz radar pulses through the blind spot zone on that side of the vehicle. The sensor receives and filters the radar signals being returned from any objects detected within the zone, then transmits the appropriate data identifying the position and speed of identified objects to the microcontroller.

The microcontroller analyzes the sensor data to determine whether any detected objects should be reported. When it is determined that an object should be reported, the microcontroller sends electronic request messages over the Controller Area Network (CAN) - Interior High Speed (IHS) data bus to its respective Driver Door Module (DDM) or Passenger Door Module (PDM). The DDM or PDM then controls its respective left or right BSM display directly through a hard wired output. The microcontroller of the LBSS or RBSS also sends electronic messages to the Radio Receiver Module (RRM) (also known as the radio or head unit) to mute any current output through the sound system speakers and to generate chime tones as an audible alert.

Each of the two BSM smart sensors is independent and communicates on the CAN data bus. The sensor performs a bulb test by requesting illumination of the triangle icon in its respective right or left blind spot display for a few seconds each time the status of the ignition switch transitions to On. Each sensor microcontroller also continually monitors the BSM system and the sensor circuits and will store a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) for any fault that is detected.

The hard wired circuits between of the smart sensors may be diagnosed using conventional diagnostic tools and procedures. Refer to the appropriate wiring information. However, conventional diagnostic methods will not prove conclusive in the diagnosis of the smart sensors or the electronic controls and communication between other modules and devices that provide some features of the BSM system. The most reliable, efficient and accurate means to diagnose the smart sensors or the electronic controls and communication related to LBSS or RBSS operation requires the use of a diagnostic scan tool.

Sounds easy :)

A Guy
 

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...

Sounds easy :)

A Guy
I still think it is possible, but sounds like a couple grand in parts plus a hole lot of work.

Unfortunately, this boy is too poor to make a go of it right now.
 

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FYI - looks like alfaOBD has more options but is clunker to use compared to diagFCA.
 

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Now that launch control is working I am back on my quest to get performance pages. I know, it's insanity but still not warm enough to install the rear reflector LEDs.

While surfing the web found this company which looks like they make a lockpick kind of device for the newer radios. Installed something like this in my 2013 grand cherokee but the interface to the iphone has been obsolete almost as soon as I installed it.

 
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