Dodge Challenger Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
Would anyone happen to have the Petty Garage sub frame connector instructions in PDF or word format. I bought my set used and I was doing a little test fitting today, and it seems that I might have to drill some holes, and needless to say, I don't mind drilling holes, but I don't want to do it unnecessarily. Thanks for you time
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,805 Posts
There's a set of U Tube videos by Luke from Steve White motors where he installs sub-frame connectors. Following those should be good enough. Or, you can just ask Petty's garage for them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
Petty's Garage told me that bolt in subs do nothing. They welded mine in and my car feels rock solid!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,135 Posts
Petty may send you over their's too. Worth asking about.

They didn't tell me that the bolt on versions "do nothing", but they did state that the welded in version is preferred.

I've held off only because I didn't want to drill holes through "treated" metal, and break the corrosion protection. More potential for future rust spots IMO.

At some point I would like to go with Petty welding some in. They do great work, and from pics that I've seen around the web, the prep the area, weld the bracing in, prep/primer/paint the are to match the car.

If I lived close to them, this would have already been done.

Best of luck to you, and the bolted in versions have to be better than no bracing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RoostKing

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Its hard to believe that a company would design and sell a product……..then tell the customers who are in the market for it, that it does nothing for their car. I am not saying it didn't happen, its just difficult to believe.


Petty's Garage told me that bolt in subs do nothing. They welded mine in and my car feels rock solid!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
Its hard to believe that a company would design and sell a product……..then tell the customers who are in the market for it, that it does nothing for their car. I am not saying it didn't happen, its just difficult to believe.
If you are bolting them in, it really doesn't do a whole lot unless you make sure you are retightening them all the time. Believe it or not some companies (Petty included) make parts just because everyone else makes one. I talked to an engineer with Chrysler and they told me a strut tower brace is another item that does little to help. He told me if it were welded in then it would make a real difference. IMO if you are going to drill a hole you might as well weld them in. Call the guys at Petty and ask them about welding them in and they will tell you it works a lot better. They can also give your welder advise on how the car should be supported when he does the job. I just feel if you are drilling a hole then you are already breaking the corrosion barrier so why not get it done right the first time. So many people cut corners and never see the real advantage of what a part was intended for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,135 Posts
With all do respect, I can tell a substantial difference in handling with just the bolted in Mopar front brace, and bolted in Petty rear braces.

Yes, generally weldments are better, but I think that the engineers that you talked to have a weld mindset, and dismiss bolting.

Yes, checking any type of bolt is good over time, but saying that "no difference" will be achieved with a bolted in item is a bias opinion, that results show is not the case.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PSM450

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
Do it right the first time. Go ahead and weld them in. After you get them welded in get some POR-15 and call it a day. Just my 2 cents worth.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
479 Posts
I talked to an engineer with Chrysler and they told me a strut tower brace is another item that does little to help...They can also give your welder advise on how the car should be supported when here does the job.
Chrysler engineers also told Mr. Norm that a big block wouldn't fit in a '68 Dart. Mr. Norm went to his garage and told one of his mechanics to swap a 383 into a Dart from the car lot. He then drove it to Detroit and showed it to Dodge executives who in turn asked the engineers why they said it couldn't be done. Chrysler engineers also designed the wimpy cowl brace that most strut bars attach to. The SpeedLogix brace completely replaces the OEM one. I'm not saying Chrysler engineers are incompetent. On the contrary. I love their products. However, everything they say is not always the gospel truth. I always recommend any strut brace as the very first mod. It makes a huge difference. And, anything you do to stiffen the car will help but yes, of course, welding in sub frames will be much sturdier than bolting on. The weight of the car should be on the wheels as if it was sitting on the ground when welding them in. Otherwise, you're going to tweak the car's geometry. You may even have trouble opening and shutting your doors.

IMO, the small amount of metal that will be exposed when cutting holes is inconsequential. Cut your holes, throw on a little Rusetolium and your good for many, many years unless you drive in the dead of winter in North Dakota.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
Its hard to believe that a company would design and sell a product……..then tell the customers who are in the market for it, that it does nothing for their car. I am not saying it didn't happen, its just difficult to believe.
Covers most of the CAI's/Catbacks on the market doesn't it? Many aftermarket performance products are snake oil, the vendors juts don't say so.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
12,920 Posts
there is a significant gain to be add with the strut braces and connectors, will it eliminate all the body roll, flex or twist, no!!!!
however i drive mine very agressivelly on mountain roads, there is definitelly a noticeable difference between with and without
Luke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
You are comparing apples to oranges here. even though CAI's and cutback will not net you 15-20 horsepower, they will get you some. In addition, most people do exhaust more for the sound than anything else. I don't think man people do Sub frame connectors for just looks. I agree that many aftermarket parts are snake oil but most get identified fairly quick as track times don't lie.


Covers most of the CAI's/Catbacks on the market doesn't it? Many aftermarket performance products are snake oil, the vendors juts don't say so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
What Luke said! When you get over 600 hp front and rear strut braces and frame connectors make a significant difference. My frame connectors are bolted and if I knew someone around where I live that could weld them in properly I would do that too but they work well for now.:guiness:

there is a significant gain to be add with the strut braces and connectors, will it eliminate all the body roll, flex or twist, no!!!!
however i drive mine very agressivelly on mountain roads, there is definitelly a noticeable difference between with and without
Luke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
Chrysler engineers also told Mr. Norm that a big block wouldn't fit in a '68 Dart. Mr. Norm went to his garage and told one of his mechanics to swap a 383 into a Dart from the car lot. He then drove it to Detroit and showed it to Dodge executives who in turn asked the engineers why they said it couldn't be done. Chrysler engineers also designed the wimpy cowl brace that most strut bars attach to. The SpeedLogix brace completely replaces the OEM one. I'm not saying Chrysler engineers are incompetent. On the contrary. I love their products. However, everything they say is not always the gospel truth. I always recommend any strut brace as the very first mod. It makes a huge difference. And, anything you do to stiffen the car will help but yes, of course, welding in sub frames will be much sturdier than bolting on. The weight of the car should be on the wheels as if it was sitting on the ground when welding them in. Otherwise, you're going to tweak the car's geometry. You may even have trouble opening and shutting your doors.

IMO, the small amount of metal that will be exposed when cutting holes is inconsequential. Cut your holes, throw on a little Rusetolium and your good for many, many years unless you drive in the dead of winter in North Dakota.

True story. Engineers love to hear themselves talk. They also love the power of their position and the words they speak. My father worked for ARCO/Lyondell for nearly 40 years, he ran that plant. Engineers always talked down to him and he would in turn prove what they had said was a lie. He wrote the manual (literally) on his plant and they still insisted that they knew more. They did not. Engineers don't know everything.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top