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So I'm thinking of using some plastic polish and a small buffing pad on my DA to restore my plastic trim. Its been 2 years and it's already looking dull. I figure polishing it will remove some of the outer layer oxidation and then follow it up with some mother's plastic restorer. Any thoughts?
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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So I'm thinking of using some plastic polish and a small buffing pad on my DA to restore my plastic trim. Its been 2 years and it's already looking dull. I figure polishing it will remove some of the outer layer oxidation and then follow it up with some mother's plastic restorer. Any thoughts?
Well, that's an intriguing approach, and I'd much rather let you try it first and report back with the results.
:wink3:

But I'm wondering if the lackluster appearance you believe needs some polishing is really just the normal non-new look this plastic gets after a while. In other words, i would be afraid I was trying to solve a problem that wasn't actually that much of a problem, if it were me about to hit my trim with some abrasives on a polisher.

My honest to goodness advice in this situation would be to try a less invasive method of bringing back some shine and see if you can live with the results from that (assuming ongoing future care of course). I really think you'll have some luck with that once you find the right product(s) and detailing process which can consistently give you a warm feeling when showing the car to others.

And then, if you ultimately cannot get a look you desire but believe is hiding in there somewhere, then get after it with some polish and the DA.

That's how I'd do it, but I'm not right in the head to begin with, so take any suggestions with a slice of lime.
:grin2:
 

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I am not sure polishing with a DA is a good idea. The trim is textured, and you don't want to polish a shine into it. It really shouldn't be necessary as a good hand application of a plastic restorer will do a great job. Product longevity varies by products. The first 3 items on this list are all highly regarded. They actually restore, but don't dye. If you want to change the trim to black, a dye product will work. The 3rd product is more expensive, but is a nano coating that can last 2 years

https://procarreviews.com/best-plastic-restorer/

A Guy
 

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So I'm thinking of using some plastic polish and a small buffing pad on my DA to restore my plastic trim. Its been 2 years and it's already looking dull. I figure polishing it will remove some of the outer layer oxidation and then follow it up with some mother's plastic restorer. Any thoughts?
I would NOT recommend polishing hard plastic trim. Especially with a DA polisher, that combination could QUICKLY cause a lot of damage to the trim or hard plastic.

This is because the tool is aggressive and is in no means intended for plastic trim, which is traditionally much softer than clear coat. Also, Automotive Correction Liquids are formulated to work with clear coat (paint). As a general rule in auto detailing we generally always avoid contact of a compound or polish with trim and most things non painted. Regularly in detailing it is common for us to actually take off the trim in order to avoid any possible contact with plastic trim. This is done to avoid possible staining from the solvents contained within the correction liquid.


My advice for restoration and LONG TERM protection would be to thoroughly clean the plastic with Nextzett - Plastic Deep Cleaner (this company was formerly called Einszett). This is the best all around deep cleaning plastic cleaner i've ever used.

After a thorough cleaning I have found that Feynlab Plastic is the best trim restorer and protector out there. It was formulated specifically for the restoration and preservation of automotive vehicle plastic trim.

Plastic will restore the trim to the original state - a deep tone with the original sheen (not tire dressing shiny) Additionally, Feynlab Plastic will keep hard plastic trim looking in top over time with greatly increased UV ray protection.

Application is straightforward as long as you follow directions well :grin2: and the results are amazing!

 

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I've always used "303" from the start, and all the trim stays looking good!
 
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