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So this weekend I finally got my plugs changed. At 40k they still looked pretty good, but was a nice wake up for spring when I took her out for a spin afterwards. Need to do some logging now with the tuner before track time gets here.

No big headaches really, the fuse box and the rear passenger side are the biggest challenges. Fitting a torque wrench in there on the passenger side took some swearing and cursing, and I highly recommend a long extension and a swivel.

Went with stock copper plugs. As mentioned in some previous posts the factory plugs seemed WAY over torqued... Watch out for your knuckles breaking some of them loose. Overall a breeze compared to changing out the plugs on my Hemi Durango...

Thought I would share for those on the fence about doing this themselves. Its pretty straight forward.

JestersHK
 
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So this weekend I finally got my plugs changed. At 40k they still looked pretty good, but was a nice wake up for spring when I took her out for a spin afterwards. Need to do some logging now with the tuner before track time gets here.

No big headaches really, the fuse box and the rear passenger side are the biggest challenges. Fitting a torque wrench in there on the passenger side took some swearing and cursing, and I highly recommend a long extension and a swivel.

Went with stock copper plugs. As mentioned in some previous posts the factory plugs seemed WAY over torqued... Watch out for your knuckles breaking some of them loose. Overall a breeze compared to changing out the plugs on my Hemi Durango...

Thought I would share for those on the fence about doing this themselves. Its pretty straight forward.

JestersHK
Did you notice any power restoration with the new plug? Im guessing not since you said the old plugs still looked pretty good.

I just hit 26k miles, once I hit 30 or 31k I am going to get them changed, and I know they won't look good the way I drive my car. :armed:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They definitely had some discoloration... Gap was ok on most. Wish I would of snapped a pic of them as I know a few guys who can tell alot by looking at old plugs.

As for power restoration there was a bit, but no huge gains or anything. I drive the piss out of my car as well and was pretty happy with how they looked being 10k overdue.

I skipped a plug changed on our Durango once and went a full 70k on a set a few years ago... Talk about power gains!!! and trashed plugs LOL.
 

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They definitely had some discoloration... Gap was ok on most. Wish I would of snapped a pic of them as I know a few guys who can tell alot by looking at old plugs.

As for power restoration there was a bit, but no huge gains or anything. I drive the piss out of my car as well and was pretty happy with how they looked being 10k overdue.

I skipped a plug changed on our Durango once and went a full 70k on a set a few years ago... Talk about power gains!!! and trashed plugs LOL.
Good stuff! Thing for the info man. Once I get my plugs out here on my next oil change I'll have to take some pics and see how they turned out. I'm excited to get new plugs in my car if that gives me more response! :eek:rangehat:
 

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Did you notice any power restoration with the new plug? Im guessing not since you said the old plugs still looked pretty good.

I just hit 26k miles, once I hit 30 or 31k I am going to get them changed, and I know they won't look good the way I drive my car. :armed:
When my TC failed I got new plugs by default with the new heads. I had 42k on them (had just found out they were due at 30k). No difference in power or gas mileage that I could tell. While looking over my disassembled engine I did notice that the plugs still looked pretty good. I'm not gonna sweat right at 30k with these, but know that I know, I will do them no later than 40k.
 

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Had my stock plugs changed at 30k with another set of stock plugs.

Engine response just felt a little "crisper" than it did before the change. Nothing huge, but felt like new again.

Old plugs looked good, but I'll keep getting them changed every 30k..................don't want any of them to freeze up in the AL heads. Don't need that headache and cost.
 
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Speaking of freezing up, a little anti seize goes a long way and should be applied to the new plug threads. Just be careful not to get any on the inner electrode.
 
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Speaking of freezing up, a little anti seize goes a long way and should be applied to the new plug threads. Just be careful not to get any on the inner electrode.
Double check what the instructions on the plug "box" says. I believe that the factory plugs state "NOT" to use this.

Double check.
 

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Yes, that's true and is because of the antiseize allowing for the potential to over torque the plugs.

I still use anti seize and haven't had any problems. I'm just careful not to over torque.
 
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I changed my plugs at 30,000 miles and didn't notice any difference. The old plugs looked good.
 

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plug type

i thought dodge uses mopar plugs which are equivalent to champion. I will be purchasing new plugs soon so are NGK plugs the same ones the dealer uses?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Factory plugs in my 09 were NGK. I always use a torque wrench on the plugs to avoid stripping them out. As I stated above the factory plugs were WAY over torqued...

Roadrunner, Other than the passenger side area by the fuse box I was able to get a torque wrench on the extension fairly easily and it was a pretty straightforward plug change.

Finally had a chance to open her up and let her eat this weekend and 19JohnEd53's description of "crisper" regarding throttle response is spot on.
 

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Don't know if this is where I should post this, but got a question. 2009 Rt......warning light came on. Had shop put it on computer. They diagnosed that cylinder 6 was mis-firing. Would new plugs fix this.
 

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I would rather fight with the headers on my 69 440 six pack than change the spark plugs on my 10 R/T. It cannot be fun.
Then you must be running a mini-starter.... calling BS if you still have the factory starter. :huh:
I left my 69 sit in the drive for 3 months after I replaced the starter & the new one failed 2 weeks later.
Didn't feel like fighting that battle again.. :cursin: lol

As to the plugs in aluminum heads... use anti seize, just be careful not to use too much.
 

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I would rather fight with the headers on my 69 440 six pack than change the spark plugs on my 10 R/T. It cannot be fun.
It's not a bad job. Unscrew the 16 bolts holding on the eight coil packs, and then remove the 16 plugs. It took me about an hour. That included carefully gapping each new plug, applying a little anti-seize, and properly torquing each new plug and coil pack bolt.

And yes, the original plugs seemed really tight.
 
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