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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The following break-in procedure is for anyone running a PWR built engine.

If the wrong type of oil is used initially, or the break-in is too easy, rings and cylinders will glaze and never seal properly. A fresh cylinder wall needs some medium to high engine loading to get the piston rings to seat properly for good compression but make sure you don't lug or overheat the engine. Use high quality, low viscosity oil (Conventional 10w30), no synthetics, too slippery. If synthetics are used during initial break in the rings are sure to glaze over.

An engine's initial run should be used to bring oil and coolant (air, oil, and/or water) up to operating temperature only, with little or no load, then shut down and allowed to cool to ambient temperature. This is important. After each run the engine needs to completely cool down to ambient temperature. After a cool down period, start it up again and take the vehicle for a spin.

This time give the engine light loads at relatively low rpm and stay out of top gear. Lugging the engine, i.e., low RPM with a lot of throttle (manifold pressure), is more detrimental than high rpm. Another key is too constantly vary engine load during the entire break-in period. A constant load is not ideal for breaking in bearing tolerances. This second run should last only 10-15 minutes before another complete cool down.

The third run should see slightly higher rpm with light to medium power loading using short bursts of acceleration to help seat the rings. Again 10-15 minutes of running should do it and again avoid top gear. A fourth run should consist of light to medium engine loads with a few more bursts of medium-high rpm, and lasting just 10-15 minutes varying the engine load and again avoiding top gear. Next while the engine is still warm drain the oil and change the filter. This gets out the new metal particles that are being worn away. Most of the metal particles will break away within the first 50 -75 miles. To ensure the rings seat well, use the same high quality oil and don't be shy about short duration high rpm blasts through the lower gears after the oil has been changed.

A few more 15-20 minute sessions should be used to work up to the engine's redline gradually increasing the engine loads. After 500 miles re-torqueing the head is not a bad idea. Switch to synthetic oil but not before 500-1500 miles. Most of the engine experts warned of the danger of breaking in the engine too easily and ending up with an engine that will always run slow whether it is from tight tolerances, inadequate ring seal or carbon buildup. Basically, be sure not to get it too hot but be sure to seat the rings properly.
 

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Great infromation. I noted they don't recommend this oil for cars running cats due to the high zinc and phosphoros content. I would however like to use this oil for the break in. What procedure do you suggest for break in if there is no dyno available?

I think they say it's okay to run their partial synthetic with cats.
 

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Good Info but why break in a engine on a Chassis Dyno?
 

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it takes for ever to slow down on the dnyo with no break LOL, gonna be a long day
 

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Where else would you break it in?


I have never seen a new engine break in on the chassis dyno? Is that common practice as of lately?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hmmm, a question answered with another question...... Lets try it again. Where else would you break in a high-performance aftermarket engine?
 

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PWR I have had many engines and I used 3 different ways. On a 50K outlaw engine its backside it first hit down the track throwing some extra fuel at it along the way down. On others I did a flywheel dyno for about 10 hits then drop it in the car. On the 426 in the Challenger I drove it for 200 miles under low boost with a safe tune up then changed the oil and loaded it up on the drums and let it rip.
 

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Great infromation. I noted they don't recommend this oil for cars running cats due to the high zinc and phosphoros content. I would however like to use this oil for the break in. What procedure do you suggest for break in if there is no dyno available?
Your gonna be SOL!:bigthumb:
 

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Seriously!? Well I guess all the street break in I do is no good anymore.

That is the best way for a street-strip engine!!
 

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That is the best way for a street-strip engine!!
yeah well.....apparently thats not what Andy wants. So maybe in the interests in everyones warranties since I have no dyno available to me I will have to tell them all to find another shop.
 

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Erik, with the way you've been polishing aluminum I'll be sure to come to you!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Didn't realize I had stated that this was an absolute requirement. I also never said it was required for our warranty either.

You guys are crazy if you think I am going to recommend on a public forum to go speeding down public roads above the speed limit. This thread is a recomendation and nothing more. Chrysler also recomends a specific oil for their engines and I would be willing to bet that you guys don't follow that either. My point being that there are numerous ways to skin a cat and this is our recomendation.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Also, brad penn has an oil for cars with cats but again this is just a recomendation. Calm down everyone.

BW,
I would also be fine with breaking it in at the drag strip. The idea is to avoid light driving till the rings have had a chance to seat. Decelerating presents allot of vacuum to aid in this process. An engine dyno would also be nice but is rarely available to the average customer.
 

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Andy rings take a while to settle sometimes. The old tymers say start the engine and hold it above 2500 rpms never just let it idle. I prefer the old fashion way cruise around some first before putting the hammer down. So say run the crap out of it from jump and if it holds up all is good!
 

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The following break-in procedure is for anyone running a PWR built engine.

Perform installation and fill with Brad Penn break-in oil with a new filter.

On a Dyno:
Warm the engine up completely. (180*-205*)

Do Three 1/2 Throttle dyno runs from 2600rpm to 4000rpm.
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes

Do Three 3/4 Throttle dyno runs from 2600rpm to 5200rpm.
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes

Do Three Full Throttle dyno runs from 2600rpm to 6500rpm or till it shifts.
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes

If you use a dyno with a brake, it's critical during break - in that you allow the engine to decelerate fully on it's own. (Don't use the dyno brake.) The engine vacuum created during closed throttle deceleration sucks the excess oil and metal off the cylinder walls.

The point of this is to remove the very small (micro) particles of ring and cylinder material which are part of the normal wear during this process. During deceleration, the particles suspended in the oil blow out the exhaust, rather than accumulating in the ring grooves between the piston and rings. This keeps the rings from wearing too much.

You'll notice that at first the engine "smokes" on decel, this is normal, as the rings haven't sealed yet. When you're doing it right, you'll notice that the smoke goes away after about 7-8 runs.

Once complete, drain the oil and replace the filter. Refill using BRAD PENN Partial Synthetic SAE 10W-30 Racing Oil.



Break-In Oil: SAE 30 mono-grade oil formulated specifically to meet the critical lubrication needs of new engines during break-in while allowing proper seating of rings and component ‘run-in’. Enhanced levels of “zinc” (zinc dialkyldithiophosphate a.k.a. ZDDP) and superior oil film strength from Penn Grade™ base oils offer complete anti-wear, anti-scuffing protection for even the most demanding of applications.

Regular Use Oil: The Brad Penn® Penn Grade 1® Racing Oils contain the higher level of anti-wear (ZDDP - zinc dialkyldithiophosphate) and enhanced film strength so critical to proper high performance engine protection. The Penn-Grade 1® oils "typical" 1,500 ppm Zinc (Zn) and 1340-1400 ppm Phosphorus (P) content provide the needed anti-wear protection to critical engine parts, such as piston/cylinder walls, camshafts under heavy valve spring pressure and especially those that employ a solid "flat tappet" type system. As important as the chemistry is to the Penn-Grade 1® oils, it is by no means the whole story. The unique base oil cut used to refine the Penn-Grade 1® Racing Oils maintain a tremendous affinity to metal surfaces. This naturally occurring "metal wetting" characteristic enables the oil to stay put on your highly stressed engines and makes the Penn-Grade 1® Racing Oil resist slinging for an extended period of time. Also, rest assured in knowing that the Penn-Grade 1® Racing Oils are 100% Made in the USA.
Didn't realize I had stated that this was an absolute requirement. I also never said it was required for our warranty either.

You guys are crazy if you think I am going to recommend on a public forum to go speeding down public roads above the speed limit. This thread is a recomendation and nothing more. Chrysler also recomends a specific oil for their engines and I would be willing to bet that you guys don't follow that either. My point being that there are numerous ways to skin a cat and this is our recomendation.
Considering you did not use the word "recommend" in the initial post and did use the term "Proper Break in Procedure for Anyone running a PWR Motor".......it didn't read like a recommendation. It also read like this was going to be used as a standard.

As far as speeding down the road goes.....you don't have to break the speed limit to properly seat rings. You also don't need specialty oil to seat rings. A good conventional oil with a few oil changes in the first 1000 miles is all that is needed.....Especially if you are using Moly Rings......they can take forever to seat. Just some aggressive on and off throttle and lots of autostick will usually seat the rings in a short amount of time.
 

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Great info. Is there a way to know when the rings have seated?
 
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