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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I have the opportunity to buy a 6,4L SRT year 07/2016 and hope you can recommend it to me.
Are there any known problems with the year of construction and what do I have to pay attention to when buying?

Thanks
uzwuz
 

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Nothing to worry about the car itself, but just like any used car it comes with a history that you need to figure out. I've got the same car and there have been no issues with it. See if you can get a dealer to print out the service history on it. Powertrain warranty should still be in effect unless it has been voided by modifications or lack of maintenance. It's a used car so all precautions as with any used car apply.




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Hi guys,

I have the opportunity to buy a 6,4L SRT year 07/2016 and hope you can recommend it to me.
Are there any known problems with the year of construction and what do I have to pay attention to when buying?

Thanks
uzwuz
Nothing specific to look for but the SRT is just a used car so a thorough used car check out is required to ensure the car is probably worth buying.

Here's a paste of something you might find of value:

My general advice is to visit the used car cold, open the hood and check the oil level, leaving the hood open. Give the other vital fluid levels a visual check at least to ensure none are low. If vital fluids are low this could be a warning flag the car wasn't properly serviced/taken care and there could be a problem. (That the car is being offered by a dealer these levels should be ok, but check everything.)

In the car start the engine. Be sure all warning lights come on and then go off once the engine has started. Pay particular attention to the CEL. Be sure the A/C is off. You test the A/C later.

Let the engine idle from cold. You want to listen for any signs of ticking/noises or any other signs the engine may not be healthy. A rough idle, backfires, spitting back, anything out of the ordinary.

If you can view coolant and oil temperature and pressure and battery voltage. You want these displayed as you get first a test ride then have a test drive.

Get out of the car and walk around the car checking body panel finish, alignment, and gaps. Note the condition of the wheels, looking for any curb rash. Check the tires. Ideally they should be factory sanctioned tires and in good condition. Check the brakes, look at the rotors for signs of damage/excessive wear -- a lip around the rotor outer diameter is a good sign the rotors are nearing the end of their life.

Check the hood and trunk hinges for any signs the fasteners have had wrenches on them. Check for signs of wrenching on the bolts that hold the fenders to the car and at the strut fasteners. At the front carefully check the radiator fasteners for any signs of wrenching.

I'd add with an SRT check the engine bolts//hardware for any signs of wrenching. Ideally you'd want to see none you'd want to the see the bolts as they were when the engine left the factory.

After some few minutes of the engine idling -- the longer the better -- and with the engine still running ok and sounding ok have the seller take you on a test ride. The route should be around 15 miles long and chosen to give the driver a chance to demo the car as you intend to use it. What is wanted is a mix of city driving with stop and go, steady moderate speed cruising on like a boulevard, and some highway/freeway driving. Ideally there should be some opportunities -- once the engine is up to temperature -- for some rather hard acceleration with the driver starting out from a standstill or a slow roll and accelerating hard up through at least a couple of gears. No need to smoke the tires or try to duplicate the factory's 0 to 60mph time but you want to experience the engine under hard acceleration to verify it pulls good, runs right, and afterwards shows no ill effects from the hard acceleration.

While a passenger of course pay attention to how the transmission shifts, how the car rides, feels. The car should not want to pull to one side or the other and the hard acceleration should give the driver a chance to perform a hard braking. No tire lock up but you want to verify the brakes have plenty of bite and the car tracks straight under hard braking.

With an automatic I recommend having the driver do a k-turn with the engine/transmission cold to see how the transmission reacts to repeated/rapid changes in direction.

After the 15 mile test ride then back at the starting point -- leaving the engine running -- get behind the wheel and drive the car over the same 15 mile test route and drive it pretty much the same way although since the car is unknown to you you can dial back on the hard acceleration test. You don't want to let the car get away from you and wrap it around a telephone pole.

And with the engine/transmission now up to temperature you do the k-turn to once again see how the transmission reacts to repeated/rapid changes in direction.

The engine idle time, 15 mile test ride and 15 mile test drive should have the engine running nearly an hour. This is on purpose to 1) Get the engine and drive train up to full operating temperature because it is in this state leaks are more active; and 2) Give the engine controller time to run through its readiness monitor tests and set all these to complete or if a problem found turn on the CEL.

After your 15 mile test drive then at the starting point if you still like the car confirm all systems work. From the head lights to the tail lights. From the horn to the back up camera (if fitted). The A/C. Check all the controls. The wipers. Everything.

At this point if you still like the car and believe you can buy it for a good price -- based on your market research -- it is good idea to arrange to have the car given a pre-purchase inspection (PPI) by a tech who is qualified to evaluate the car. A Dodge dealer tech can be used. These guys evaluate trade ins all the time.

This gets the car in the air so a check can be made for any leak sign. At the same time a check can be made for any signs of damage or damage repair.

You want to really experience the car in its natural state: engine running and on the road. All cars generally look good on the lot. But it is how they look and run and feel and sound and smell on the road, or after being on the road, that really matters.

Be aware and adjust your price accordingly that the car probably needs some attention. Unless the seller can supply paper work the services are current or you can run the VIN through a Dodge dealer and get a list of services budget for various services that are due.

The car could be due -- although this might not be called for in the factory service schedule -- a brake fluid flush/bleed; new engine air filter and cabin air filter.

I'd budget to treat the cooling system to a drain and refill with fresh coolant. This every 4 years or so helps extend the life of the water pump and hoses.

Tires should be in good condition but if not if the tires are worn unevenly budget for new tires and an alignment assuming wear is not severe enough to suspect the car's bent. In this case you don't want new tires and an alignment you want to walk away from the car.

Remember these things: Price is not fact only an opinion. And there is always another car. If you find something negative about this car don't feel you have to buy it. There is another car out there you'll like just as much if not more than this one and it won't have any negatives.
 

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Wow @Rockster this is a fantastic advice on buying a used car! Saving it for myself...

I would add two very minor points for OP. Check that tires are the same brand in front and back. This is the kind of car where you'll likely be replacing rear tires more often than front, so if the previous owner didn't maintain the car well, cheap rear tires could be an indicator of that. This isn't a categorical rule though.

Additionally, when you pop the hood of the car, take a picture of it and post it on this forum somewhere. People here will quickly tell you what (if any) mods have been done to the engine. Most common ones are probably CAI and an oil catch can. Those aren't anything to be afraid of, but if I saw something like an aftermarket supercharger, I probably wouldn't buy the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi, guys,

First sorry for my english but a translator helps me a little :)
Wow thank you so much for the perfect manual because I can't do anything wrong anymore :)

The VIN has already been checked and everything is ok with it.
All maintenance was carried out by specialist workshops (invoices available).

many thanks
I'll keep you informed as soon as I inspect the car.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hell, Jea, I did it.

on Friday I have my new baby.
someone can tell me how the driving modes differ, what exactly is the difference between Trak, Sport etc.?

Thanks
 

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Hell, Jea, I did it.

on Friday I have my new baby.
someone can tell me how the driving modes differ, what exactly is the difference between Trak, Sport etc.?

Thanks
Think you can go to:

www.mopar.com

and with your car's VIN sign up and then gain access to digital copies of the manuals that should have come with the car. Among these is the drive supplement manual which covers the various drive modes. Not sure to what depth though.
 

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