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Discussion Starter #1
Went to the dealer the other day to inquire about changing the brake pads. They said if I do the pads I have to change the rotors too. Of course I gave them the "yea, ok" look but is there any truth to this? Thanks
 

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i only change the rotors when they are below the limit to turn them. if they arent grooved too bad, i just change the pads
 

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ONLY if the rotors are damaged AND are beyond repair...

Brake pad replacement does NOT automatically = rotor replacement. Replace rotors if they are damaged AND can't be ground back into speck.

Also, check online for other brake pad options. Brembo name brand ones aren't cheap. There are other alternatives that are just as good (or VERY close). There are brake pads that create less dust but may fade during spirited driving.

There's one brand, can't think of it, that doesn't noticeably fade, and also creates little dust. Ask around here for options and research. Also, you can check other dodge sites if no one here has an answer.

*If you're like me, and aren't mechanically gifted, take your car to an independent shop for an opinion on the rotors.
** I'm all thumbs with mechanics, but I changed my own brake pads on my SRT8... actually pretty simple. I took me awhile (probably 5x's longer than most) but I did it... and I'm the guy who has only changed his own oil ONCE. Brake pads, at least on the SRT, are that straightforward of a job!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the information. Just as I thought, they were just trying to push something I didn't need. I was looking at the Hawks pads but I read they don't stop as well as the original ones. I'll do another search and see what I can find.

Thanks again :thumbsup:
 

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Actually I have changed out my original Brembo pads for Hawk HPS pads.
It was very easy to do.
Just 2 pins to pop out then remove a small bracket (it just pops off after the pins are out) and the pads just slide out like toast from a toaster---REALLY---

As for the HPS pads, I love them. VERY little dust and no squeeking at low speed braking (like the Brembo's) and 95% same braking performance as the Brembo's.

Best investment I ever made for my car (after the skip shift eliminator).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So you would say they perform just about the same as the Brembos with the stopping power? And how much do they cost?

I read somewhere that with the Hawks you're giving up stopping power. Thanks again for the info.
 

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So you would say they perform just about the same as the Brembos with the stopping power? And how much do they cost?

I read somewhere that with the Hawks you're giving up stopping power. Thanks again for the info.
Well I got mine from here: Zeckhausen Racing
I hope I'm not breaking any forum rules here by posting this link....

As for the stopping power, I did look into this in depth and found the the ceramic pads produce the least dust but compared to the original Brembo's they will give up some bite. I paid for performance brakes and was not going to settle for less that what I had with the Brembo's.

The HPS (high performance street pads) are VERY close in stopping performance as the Brembo's, and the dust is almost gone.
They (the HPS pads) dont squeek either under light braking like the Brembo's-A bonus I suppose.

Either way I love them and I can say that with 8500 miles on the car I see very little wear on them...But I dont race the car.

Hope this helps...:bigthumb:
 

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Went to the dealer the other day to inquire about changing the brake pads. They said if I do the pads I have to change the rotors too. Of course I gave them the "yea, ok" look but is there any truth to this? Thanks
:notallthere:

Aren't you glad you didn't go in there and inquire about an Oil change!
 

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this might sound real girl but how many kms do you have on the current brakes? i only drive in summer and just got new tires but never thought to check the brakes.....

i'm currently around 34,000kms (just rolled over)......

i should really bone up more on my car facts lol
 

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I went with EBC Red stuff pads and EBC Sport rotors (drilled/slotted). I got them from AutoAnything with a 16% discount on top of their 40% discount and free shipping.
 

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Ok, - I finally took the plunge and put the Hawk HPS's on that MoparRick's talked me into what, a year or two ago ?

Removing the brake pads is stupid easy! Geeze, - I was SO impressed with this caliper design, but even more so with the design of the pin, - specifically the retaining mechanism that keeps the pin in. The head of the pin (which comes in from the back side) has a small, loose-fitting steel ferrule sleeve on the head that gets compressed into the fitted pin bore on the back of the caliper. Most impressive all the way around. You get the feeling that you are working on something precision like a part on the Space shuttle or something.

Basically, you get a pin punch and punch in these pins :



At first, you think that you bottom out the pin punch before driving out the pin all the way out. But not true. It's the spring-steel clip that keeps if from falling out on it's own. You simply push down on the spring, and pin can be pulled out from the back with your pinky.

On the fronts, you have to lightly pry between the rotor hub and the front edge of the brake pad (closest to the rotor hub) with a screw driver. There is a slotted area in the caliper towards the rotor hub to gain access.

Alternately, you can use a small philips screw driver to pry up (and out) on the holes on the outer edges of the pad (holes where the pins go thru) against the outside of the caliper (keeping careful not to chip the nice red paint).

With a bigger screw driver, you'll need to carefully wedge between the rotor and each piston to drive it back in some to make more clearance for the new, more thinker pad. When you press on in, the pressure pushes the adjacent piston out. I found that I could simply hold the one piston in with my finger(s) while gently wedging a big screw driver between the piston and the rotor. This wasn't a problem, or a challenge in the least bit.

I did clean and wipe down the pins, and even smeared a thin coat of Anti-seize on the pin, specifically the steel ferule on the head (since I saw a bit of rust on it).

Shimmy the new pads in, put one side of the clip in place, and push the pin in from the back side while aligning the pads so that the holes in the pad line up and allows the pin to come thru. When you go to tap the pin in from the back side, you'll probably need the same pin punch. I used a little tack hammer. It's a slight challenge to keep the pin punch on the head of the pin as you are driving it in from the back side, but it's not bad. I handed up using the side of the tack hammer while concentrating on keeping the pin punch on the head of the pin.

As you are tapping in the pin, you'll know when it's home as the pitch of the tink-tink-tinking sound will change drastically, and you'll know you got it all the way in (and see it protruding thru the front of the caliper.

You'll ultimately chip a bit of the nice thick red paint off of the caliper, mainly on the back side where the head of the pin goes flush with the caliper in the back side. Hopefully it doesn't start to rust.

Back brakes: more of the same, except that the pads are smaller, as are the pins. As such, you'll need a smaller pin-punch. The left rear is a little tight behind the caliper as far as getting enough swing with the side of the tack hammer and the smaller pin punch, but stick with it, and keep tinking away until the note of the tinking sound changes.

Persistence pays off here. Even if you think you're not getting enough energy tinking on the pin punch while driving the pin in from the back side on this left rear caliper, stick with it, and concentrate on keeping the pin punch centered on the head of the pin, - the note will change, and you will know when you get it homed.

Performance: well, I would'nt say that they are 95% of the original Brembo pads, but to be fair, all I did was a few trips around the neighborhood, and one trip on the freeway and off the next exit, turned around and went home with a few hard stops along the way.

So I'm not sure they are broke in yet, and fully bedded. I'd say more like 75% of the originals, maybe a little less. Also, for some reason, the new front Hawk HPS's have quite a bit of material missing due to the chamfering on both sides of the lining, so there's less contact area. So as the pads wear, more and more of the chamfering will wear out, and there will be more pad to rotor contact area, and hopefully the bite will increase and resemble more of the factory original.

Speaking of factories, with all of the dusting that we all have been plagued with, I was surprised with how much meat was left on the pads. Here are my original OEM Brembo pads after 20,476 miles standing up against the box from the new Hawk HPS's :




I'll do a follow-up post to this thread in a few weeks to report back on both, the dusting, as well as performance perception.
 

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Don't forget to bed the brakes..
 

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You probably wouldnt need rotors.

The hardest thing about changing pads on these cars is jacking the damn things up! What a pain in the ass!
 

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I wouldn't think that you need to bleed your brakes just by changing the brake pads, - I certainly didn't do that.

But I did take the car to work today which is a pretty brutal 66-mile round trip commute to say the least, - 50/50 highway (with hard FAST mid-freeway slowdowns), and 2-lane road with slowdowns/stoppages that catch you off guard in a heartbeat.

The new Hawk HPS brake pads are noticeably different than the OEM Brembo's. Not sure I like them yet, but I'll give them some more time to break in. They don't seem to come on as hard and fast, and don't seem to have that initial bite that the Brembo's have when you first tap the brakes. Not sure I like that yet, but like I said, I give em some more time. The upshot is, as easy as they are to change, if I hand up not liking the Hawk HPS's, I can always put the original Brembo's on and just live with the dust.
 

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Did you bed them..?
 

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Did you bed them..?
Yes. Maybe I can do it a second time.

But one of my concerns is, and as I mentioned earlier, because of the way that the new pads are so aggressively chamfered on both edges of the lining on each pad, there is a lot less contact area than the OEM Brembo pads, - more than a 5% reduction in contact area from what I can visually guestimate. That level of reduction in contact surface area doesn't seem right.

Only the OEM Brembo rear pads have a chamfer, and it's only on one edge (and none on the front as you can see from my photo's above). And the factory OEM Brembo pads have a directional "arrow" on the back indicating which direction the rotor should rotate for each pad. Since the front pads are all interchangeable, looks like they decided to grind chamfers on both edges so that you don't have to worry about matching pads for direction.

Either event, the factory fronts don't appear to have ever had any chamfer ground in them, (or at least any that remained after 20K miles).

Like I said, I'll give them a few more weeks, mainly to access the brake dust reduction aspects of the new Hawk HPS's, and if I still don't like the performance after that, I'll take them off, and offer them up for sale to the forum members.
 

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Well, I do believe you'll get some degree of lesser performance on the new pads but there's always a tradeoff when dealing with stuff like this. I took my Brembo pads off within the first few months of having the car. I'm OK with how they stop now, but then again I don't race the car. Well, not at the track anyway. I just got used to the stopping performance of the replacements and I moved on. I'm sure like you said, I'm losing about 5 to 10% of stopping power with mine.

BTW, I don't think bedding them a second time will help. Unless you didn't complete the cycle the first time.
 

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Well, I do believe you'll get some degree of lesser performance on the new pads but there's always a tradeoff when dealing with stuff like this.
Possibly, but it feels like a lot more than 10% loss of performance. If they did it right, there shouldn't be any loss in performance. Significantly reducing contact area (with the crazy/aggressive chamfer cuts in the lining) isn't the way to do it. If anything, they could have increased contact area by making the lining footprint bigger (there's room on the metal carrier plate for that).

I took my Brembo pads off within the first few months of having the car.
And put on what ?

I just got used to the stopping performance of the replacements and I moved on.
And its possible that I too can get used to it too, but the brakes are one of the best assets of the SRT, and adds so much to the driving experience, seems a bit foolish (now) to dip into that (asset) to mitigate a dusting problem.

When you're in the inside of the car (taking part in the driving experience), you don't see the brake dust, and hardly thinking about it. I'm thinking that just ordering one of those self-shrinking garden hoses that I've been seeing on the TV might have been the better approach to the brake dusting issue.

I'm sure like you said, I'm losing about 5 to 10% of stopping power with mine.
Depending on how you actually measure that, I'm sure it's a lot more than that, - at least with the Hawk HPS's w/ 100 miles on them. The effect on the total package driving experience could be affected more than the actual percentage of braking performance loss.

BTW, I don't think bedding them a second time will help. Unless you didn't complete the cycle the first time.
The bedding process didn't do squat. Besides, I never "bedded" the factory OEM Brembo pads, nor do I believe that they did that at the factory.
 

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Keep in mind that you are trying to seat a new pad on worn roter face, this will take longer than if the roters han been resurfaced. Imo brake roters should allways be machined or replaced when changing pads for the best performance. Good luck!
 
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